Building Brand Identity & Equity
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9 inspiring ads that broke down stereotypes (single page view) - iMediaConnection.com

9 inspiring ads that broke down stereotypes (single page view) - iMediaConnection.com | Building Brand Identity & Equity | Scoop.it

Brand messaging has long permeated our culture. In the 1960s, American girls grew up believing that "blondes have more fun" and if you "give her a Hoover, you give her the best."

 

Mad Men-era ads promoting lotions and dishwashing liquids extolled the terror of turning 30. Ladies, your hands and face will dry up like a crustacean if you do not moisturize constantly. In the words of an old lotion ad, "Would you want to hold hands with a lobster?"

 

While a lot of progress has been made in the last 50 years, sexism and ageism obviously haven't disappeared from advertising. A woman, regardless of color, is often portrayed in limited capacities. She's young mommy calmly strapping her kid into a minivan or she's the mom with a Mona Lisa smile pulling out a fried, frozen chicken dish proud of her cleverness at meal problem-solving. Invariably, this includes a Martha Stewart look that has sustained for 25 years: blue work shirts and khakis. 
 
If a woman is over 30, she is plopped on a couch chatting about her intestinal bacteria with Jamie Lee Curtis or doling out sage cleaning tips. If she's under 30, she's the large breasted, slim-hipped "up for anything" sexpot who paaarrrties with a cold round of brew. This is the same woman who, upon turning 45, becomes the patient, yet loving "up for anything" spouse of her tired, irritable, cannot get anything up, 50-plus partner of erectile dysfunction prescription drug ads. And all of these white gals do yoga!


Via Russ Merz, Ph.D.
Sophie Bloomfield's insight:

These brands have made a bold move by confronting stereotypes. Not only do I applaud them from an ethical viewpoint, but it's also interesting to see that these risky ads have sparked a lot of social conversation about their brands; both good and bad. Is any attention good attention?

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Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s curator insight, August 11, 2014 12:49 PM

This article reviews some of the progress made by some brands to remove the use of sex and age based stereotypes in advertising. It contains some very good examples.

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Social marketing: show the world what your brand’s values are

Social marketing: show the world what your brand’s values are | Building Brand Identity & Equity | Scoop.it
McDonald’s is offering burgers for cans, while some US residents can score free Ben & Jerry’s ice-cream for trading in violent video games
Sophie Bloomfield's insight:

A brand is much more than a product and a logo. A successful brand evokes an idea in the consumer's head about 'who' the brand is: their values, their vibe, even events the brands can be linked to all add to brand equity. This article discusses one contributing element to brand personality, 'social marketing'.

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Capiche | Mt. Ashland Creates Its Brand from the Inside Out

Capiche | Mt. Ashland Creates Its Brand from the Inside Out | Building Brand Identity & Equity | Scoop.it
Mt. Ashland Creates Its Brand from the Inside Out, a post from Capiche's Chris Cook, a leadership coach focused on happiness, culture and living your brand.
Sophie Bloomfield's insight:

Chris Cook really understands the key to creating a valuable brand - it is having a meaningful brand identity, which shines through every aspect of the business. "Your culture is your brand; your brand is your culture." Culture is a big way you can really differentiate a brand.

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Apple Is More Like a Band than a Company

Apple Is More Like a Band than a Company | Building Brand Identity & Equity | Scoop.it
It makes stuff it loves – and doesn't care what you think.
Sophie Bloomfield's insight:

I love this blog, it really breaks down Apple's secret to success. Rather than focussing on having the latest and greatest techy-tech gadgets; Apple keep it simple. They know, that the product itself, is really the thing consumers pay the least attention to. And like a band, they instead maintain a fascinating brand personality and integrity, which is ultimately why we all keep going back for more.

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Rescooped by Sophie Bloomfield from Integrated Brand Communications
Scoop.it!

9 inspiring ads that broke down stereotypes (single page view) - iMediaConnection.com

9 inspiring ads that broke down stereotypes (single page view) - iMediaConnection.com | Building Brand Identity & Equity | Scoop.it

Brand messaging has long permeated our culture. In the 1960s, American girls grew up believing that "blondes have more fun" and if you "give her a Hoover, you give her the best."

 

Mad Men-era ads promoting lotions and dishwashing liquids extolled the terror of turning 30. Ladies, your hands and face will dry up like a crustacean if you do not moisturize constantly. In the words of an old lotion ad, "Would you want to hold hands with a lobster?"

 

While a lot of progress has been made in the last 50 years, sexism and ageism obviously haven't disappeared from advertising. A woman, regardless of color, is often portrayed in limited capacities. She's young mommy calmly strapping her kid into a minivan or she's the mom with a Mona Lisa smile pulling out a fried, frozen chicken dish proud of her cleverness at meal problem-solving. Invariably, this includes a Martha Stewart look that has sustained for 25 years: blue work shirts and khakis. 
 
If a woman is over 30, she is plopped on a couch chatting about her intestinal bacteria with Jamie Lee Curtis or doling out sage cleaning tips. If she's under 30, she's the large breasted, slim-hipped "up for anything" sexpot who paaarrrties with a cold round of brew. This is the same woman who, upon turning 45, becomes the patient, yet loving "up for anything" spouse of her tired, irritable, cannot get anything up, 50-plus partner of erectile dysfunction prescription drug ads. And all of these white gals do yoga!


Via Russ Merz, Ph.D.
Sophie Bloomfield's insight:

These brands have made a bold move by confronting stereotypes. Not only do I applaud them from an ethical viewpoint, but it's also interesting to see that these risky ads have sparked a lot of social conversation about their brands; both good and bad. Is any attention good attention?

more...
Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s curator insight, August 11, 2014 12:49 PM

This article reviews some of the progress made by some brands to remove the use of sex and age based stereotypes in advertising. It contains some very good examples.