Assessment Strategies Collection
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Laundry Day

Laundry Day is a strategy in the formative assessment process mentioned by Cassandra Erkens in her article entitled "Scenarios on the Use of Formative Classroom Assessment" (2007).  This is a strategy where students evaluate their own learning in preparation for a chapter or unit test.  They group themselves in the classroom around four different kinds of laundry detergent: Tide, Gain, Bold and Cheer.  In their chosen corner they will work on activities to enrich or improve their understanding of the required content.  The teacher can readily assess the students' level of understanding of the basic concepts covered in the unit or chapter.  The teacher provides support as needed, as well as help being provided by students who are sure they have mastered the content.  None of the work generated during this time counts as a grade, but students are scaffolded to increase their chances of success on the upcoming test.

Dan Schmidt's insight:

Of all the types of formative assessment this one may be the most time consuming to prepare. However, this would be incredibly helpful in preparing for a large test. This might be effective tool to set up a few days before an exam and give the class the day/period to prepare for an exam. It would also give me an educator an opportunity to to see where students mights struggle before an exam, giving the educator time to address any content that needs to be covered again. 

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Graphic Organizers - Padlet

Graphic Organizers - Padlet | Assessment Strategies Collection | Scoop.it

Create a digital cork board or non digital cork board. Not all students express themselves the same way, especially when it comes to what they have learned. Websites like pad let allow students to create and share ideas in a much more visual way. In using this students can organize photos, text, and ideas in a graphical and visual style. this can be useful for organizing timelines, creating historical family tress, and connecting photos with people and concepts. 

Dan Schmidt's insight:

I would love to try using this in my classroom provided my students had access to the internet. This would be excellent strategy in giving formative assessment to my students on what they have learned on topics we have covered. I defiantly have them use this in connecting ideas to people, or connecting photos to events, or even building timelines. 

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Different Types of Exams - Humanities

Different Types of Exams - Humanities | Assessment Strategies Collection | Scoop.it

'Summative' assessments are set to enable tutors to evaluate, and assign a mark to their students' learning at a particular point in time. The mark assigned contributes to the final outcome of the students' final grade.

The most important thing when completing any form of assessment or examination is to establish what the goalposts are, by looking at:

the exact details of the assignment, including instructions about format, presentation and structurethe marking criteria for the assessmentthe "intended learning outcomes" for the course, i.e. what the tutor has stated that s/he expects you to be able to demonstrate in order to pass the course

(University of Manchester)

Dan Schmidt's insight:

While these exams are not my favorite form of assessment they are important. Exams such as Oral reports, multiple choices questions and short answer questions are important for teachers and students as they measure what a student is learning in a diagnostic sense. Interpretation of the data collected from summative assessments, such as these, are helpful in guiding future lessons and instruction for the students. They also provide progress reports to a parent or school district. 

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Exit Slips or Minute Papers - Technology Coach

The student is directed to write one or two important concepts from the day’s lesson. They are generally completed within the last few minutes of class or at the end of a lesson and handed to the teacher on the way out the door.

Dan Schmidt's insight:

I like this strategy because it gives students a few moments at the end of the lesson to reflect on what they have learned and on questions they may have. I also like this strategy as a teacher because I can then take these exit slips home and evaluate what I may need to go over again. This way the student feels heard at the end of each day as well as the teacher is receiving meaningful feedback. 

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Think-Pair-Share

The activity involves three basic steps.  During the "think" stage, the teacher tells students to ponder a question or problem.  This allows for wait time and helps students control the urge to impulsively shout out the first answer that comes to mind.  Next, individuals are paired up and discuss their answer or solution to the problem.  During this steps students may wish to revise or alter their original ideas.  Finally, students are called upon to share with the rest of the class.

Dan Schmidt's insight:

I really like this formative assessment strategy because it involves critical thinking skills, collaboration, and community development. The act of pausing to thing gives the student a chance to collect their thoughts on a particular subject. The pairing up allows for a collaboration of ideas and perspectives as well as a self check on information gained. The sharing aspect of the assessment encourages community participation in sharing thoughts, concepts, and perspectives. 

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Discussion

The teacher can initiate the discussion by presenting students with an open-ended question.  The goal is to build knowledge and develop critical and creative thinking skills.  Discussions allow students to increase the breadth and depth of their understanding while discarding erroneous information and expanding and explicating background knowledge (Black and Wiliam 1998; Doherty 2003).   By activating students as learning resources for one another there is the possibility of some of the largest gains seen in any educational intervention (Slavin, Hurley and Chamberlain 2003).  The teacher can assess student understanding by listening to the student responses and by taking anecdotal notes.

Dan Schmidt's insight:

I really like this formative assessment approach because not only does it encourage students to interact with each other, but it also activates students' critical thinking process. This also opens up students to different ways of thinking, perspectives, and opinions. As a teacher this would give me onsite into the process in which my students are processing and interpreting what they are learning. 

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Constructive Quizzes

Constructive quizzes will not only furnish teachers with feedback on their students, but they serve to help students evaluate their own learning.  The process is outlined in the document below.  By using quizzes to furnish students with immediate feedback, the teacher can quickly determine the status of each student in relation to the learning targets, and students can learn more during the discussions that immediately follow the quizzes, instead of having to wait until the next day to see the results of the assessment in the form of a meaningless grade on the top of a paper.

Dan Schmidt's insight:

I enjoy this formative method of assessment because it allows me s a teacher to have instant feedback on whether students are have grasped content already covered. It also allows the students to have feedback on what they have learned. I would use this the day a reading assignment was due or the day after we discussed something in class then instantly look over the answers and discuss any that appear to be incorrect. 

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Social Studies - Rubrics

In building a rubric it is important to remember to divide the project along lines that are congruent with the standards you are trying to teach. It is also critical that you, as an educator, are using language that is clear, age appropriate, and specific.  This website provides excellent examples of rubrics for geography, civics, economics, history, and interpersonal perspectives for mid-level students. 

Dan Schmidt's insight:

I really like this form of summative assessment, because it gives students a detailed assessment of what they are excelling at as well as areas that require improvement. This also gives teachers specific and detailed feedback on what his/her students are struggling with in their learning, as well as any areas that the educator may need to address and reteach to his/her students. 

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Classroom Response Systems (“Clickers”)

A classroom response system (sometimes called a personal response system, student response system, or audience response system) is a set of hardware and software that facilitates teaching activities.

Dan Schmidt's insight:

I really like the idea of having this in that it gives the person clicking anonymity unlike the signals strategy. I would enjoy using this strategy in teaching government and civics where students can vote on certain bills and social topics before discussing them and then after. That way we can analyze and discuss changes in opinion. Like the signals approach I would like to use CRS to help quickly gauge what students are learning, however unlike the signals approach this approach avoids the added peer pressure. 

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Signals

Signals can be used by students to indicate their understanding of the concept presented in a lesson.  The teacher can quickly scan the classroom and assess who understands the concept, who may need more help, and who does not have the idea at all.

Dan Schmidt's insight:

I like the idea of signals for lessons that cover large concepts and new terms. This is an easy and quick formative assessment to see if the class is understanding a concept or term. A simple thumbs up or thumbs down is sufficient, however there are many different ways of gaining this assessment, such as using multi colored cups. 

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