Assessment Strategies
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10 Assessments You Can Perform In 90 Seconds

10 Assessments You Can Perform In 90 Seconds | Assessment Strategies | Scoop.it
10 Assessments You Can Perform In 90 Seconds
Johnny Indlecoffer's insight:

Big Picture

In this assessment strategy, you diagram the content–where does it fit in and how does it function in its natural “bigger picture.” This is effective because Instead of just finding the answers and then being "done," students can dig deeper and find the bigger meaning. This is especially good for abstract or right-brain thinkers. A good example of this strategy is in civics: it is impossible to understand the rules we live by and how they’re formed without understanding the 3 branches of government.  By looking at this example we see how for many parts of learning students learn terms without seeing the application or bigger picture which helps for true understanding.

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12 Strategies For Critical Assessment

12 Strategies For Critical Assessment | Assessment Strategies | Scoop.it
12 Strategies For Critical Assessment
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Student-Generated Test Questions: 

This title is pretty self explanatory about using student generated test questions to help create ultimately the unit test.  How it works is we assign groups, each addressing a topic in an upcoming test, and have students generate potential test questions. We then choose the best questions from each group, so that every student will feel familiar with at least a part of the test for which they are preparing.  This is so successful because knowing what students know and what questions they want to ask helps test students on what they truly know instead of just memorizing content which often is a big problem.  This just happens to be very interactive where students work in groups to generate the best questions on what they know.  What I especially like about this strategy is that it gives students confidence knowing that they have a say in what they are tested on.  Students won't be able to memorize all the content but instead learn it and be able to Ace the test(s).

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Intel Education Assessing Projects: Demonstrating Understanding

Intel Education Assessing Projects: Demonstrating Understanding | Assessment Strategies | Scoop.it
Use these strategies to assess student understanding and skill at the end of the project.
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5 Assessment Strategies Every Teacher Should Know

5 Assessment Strategies Every Teacher Should Know | Assessment Strategies | Scoop.it
5 Assessment Strategies Every Teacher Should Know
Johnny Indlecoffer's insight:

 Student-Made Tests:

These are assessments that the students prepare and create. The teacher can alter them and proofread so the answers are not just memorized. I could see myself using this in the classroom based on the appeal it may have for students and give them a chance to create questions on areas that interest them most.  I also think it is a form of assessment that could work for every unit and reduce stress for students when it comes to the idea of taking tests.  One example, for history could be that after studying the different agricultural products in the northern and southern colonies, the self-test questions a student writes might be: What were the crops from the colonies in the north and from the south? How are the climates, land and water supply different in one northern city and one southern city? When the teacher rewrites the question it could prompt more analysis and executive function connections if it is rephrased: “Give an example of how the climate, water supply, and soil influenced the agricultural products in one northern and one southern city during the Colonial Era.” In this example the teacher knows that the student has reviewed the facts necessary to make the higher-level connection and analysis and therefore has the tools for successful higher-level thinking. 

 

The Complexity & Diversity Of Project-Based Learning:

These are projects that are pre approved by me (teacher) that demonstrate comprehension of the material covered in the unit. These projects are great because they can connect the newly learned patterns of knowledge to related, previously stored knowledge.  These projects can include skits, posters, oral presentations, debates, papers, or demonstrations that assess understanding apart from basic knowledge. These projects are great because they can be done in pairs or groups, as well as individual projects.  A project example for a unit of study of modern Europe would have students select a country and simulate travel to that country including finding out how to get passports and visas, what clothing to bring, what hotels are near the important historic or cultural places they plan to visit, the money exchange rate, a budget, location of cities to visit along their travel route through their country, useful phrases to know in that language, cultural behaviors appropriate to that country, items they might expect to find on menus and etc.  By using this assessment in class I truly believe the possibilities are endless as to what the students may create and bring to class.

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40 Alternative Assessments for Learning

With this creative list of 40 alternative assessments ideas, your students can prove their knowledge and skills in a way that makes learning fun and engaging.
Johnny Indlecoffer's insight:

Time Line:

This strategy asks students to create a class timeline as they study different eras.  Each student works on a particular few events within a small time allowing for students to dig deeper on certain events.  What I like about this is that when the chapter or unit is done, we put the master time line up in the classroom and continue to add as new eras are learned.  Personally when a teacher would post our work up around the classroom I would be motivated and happy due to this positive encouragement.  This strategy puts this idea on a big scale and I personally have an idea of by the end of the year having a timeline fill the room. (wrap around each wall)  This strategy will help students have a better concept of important events as well as following instructions and stay within their years and digging deeper to find what exactly happened.

 

Museum Exhibit:

This is awesome!!!! What happens is, students each create a museum “artifact” and set them up in the classroom as a museum, where they will stand next to their artifact to explain and answer questions from visitors.  Not only does this assessment allow students to be active and move around, but also students are assessed on so many different skills that will be used without students knowing so.  For example having students speak out about their artifacts help them overcome nervousness with speaking in front of others by doing it on a smaller few person scale.  This also is rather fun and exciting which will motivate students to spend the extra time so that they create and know about different artifacts.  An interesting idea that I saw from this assessment is being able to invite other classes or parents to come do a walkthrough of your museum which promotes interaction with other classes and students parents.  I plan on using this due to how awesome it is and I hope the students will enjoy it as much as I see the success of this working.

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10 Formative Asssessment Strategies for Flipped Environments - Flip It Consulting

10 Formative Asssessment Strategies for Flipped Environments - Flip It Consulting | Assessment Strategies | Scoop.it
Dr. Barbi Honeycutt facilitates professional development workshops focused on college teaching to enhance teaching and learning. Flip It Consulting focuses on creating resources to support active learning in the flipped classroom.
Johnny Indlecoffer's insight:

One Sentence Summary:
This is an easy assessment to use in class where we ask students to write a one sentence summary in their own words. This is an easy assessment but can tell us a lot about our students comprehension of material.  Some examples include: (1) Summarize a theory; (2) Interpret the first four lines of a famous speech; (3) Explain the final answer to a problem; (4) Explain the main point of the video; (5) Justify a decision based on the findings presented in an article.

As these examples show, they are mainly simple questions but the answers from them show an understanding or failure of understanding for what students should have gained from content.  I really want to implement this assessment due to the fact that its simple to use and create but can have a big affect on assessing students learning

 

Ticket Out the Door
Ticket out the door is very self explanatory and commonly used in schools.  Basically, we plan 2-3 minutes at the end of our class for students to write, solve, fill in the blank, etc. After they fill in their response on a sheet of paper or index card, they turn them in before being allowed to leave class that day.  This strategy works wonders and is commonly used due to its success and simplicity.  What I like about this assessment is that it is easy to construct and can be created day of if we are wondering how our students are feeling on our unit.  Also this assessment is open for many creative ideas that can work for almost any subject or unit and can be done daily.  One video I found the teacher used this strategy daily with his students and noticed a big impact on its success.

 

Three Things I Learned
This assessment is very simple and asks what did students learn today.  Why this assessment works is focused on seeing through the discussion, reading, as well as learning what do students retain /remember regarding todays content.  How this works is you ask students to write three things they learned in class. This strategy is interesting because it will allow you to see what types of activities and topics that create the most interest. Do students only remember what was covered during the first few minutes of class? Do they mainly remember the activity or demonstration you used? Did they get the main point of the lecture?  These questions demonstrate how we are able to find out where our students stand with knowledge after class.  Personally I think students will enjoy this assessment because they can write about whatever they want and explain how/what they learned which should be easy as long as they were involved with class and content.


Clearest Point, Muddiest Point
Here’s a popular classroom assessment technique that asks the students what they know and don't know after a day of teaching. At any point during class, most likely at the end, ask students to write one concept they clearly understand or remember from today’s class (clearest point). Then, ask students to write one concept that is still confusing or something they are uncertain about (muddiest point). When you review their responses, you will most likely see themes emerge in terms of what “sticks” and what doesn’t when it comes to the types of teaching and learning strategies you have used in class. This strategy also boosts students’ confidence because they can explain what they know while also allowing them the opportunity to ask for additional clarification about something that is still causing confusion.  I plan on using this in class because I think it is a real approach to find out what students know and don't know and hopefully from your findings you will be able to spend more time on the confusing areas.

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Intel Education Assessing Projects: Monitoring Progress

Intel Education Assessing Projects: Monitoring Progress | Assessment Strategies | Scoop.it
Use these strategies to help students stay on-track, design appropriate instruction, and document growth.
Johnny Indlecoffer's insight:

Learning Logs!

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Intel Education Assessing Projects: Gauging Student Needs

Intel Education Assessing Projects: Gauging Student Needs | Assessment Strategies | Scoop.it
Use these strategies prior to instruction to help determine a student’s background experiences, skills, attitudes, and misconceptions.
Johnny Indlecoffer's insight:

Graphic organizers are a good assessment to use in class. They provide a visual representation of student’s current conceptual understanding as well as their thinking processes and aim to  illuminate preconceptions.  At the beginning of a project elicit information from students by creating a graphic organizer on a chart to get an accurate idea of students’ prior knowledge. Provide organizers for individual student use throughout the project. This is best effective at the beginning of a unit to have students create a graphic organizer on a chart to get an accurate idea of students’ prior knowledge.   To see the progress we must provide organizers for individual students use throughout the entire unit.  I think this is a plausible, visual, way to track students knowledge as they learn during a unit.  I plan on implementing this for my students early on to track their progress.

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