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ShiteShirts: The Most Outrageous Shirts in the World

ShiteShirts: The Most Outrageous Shirts in the World | Assembly Blueprint | Scoop.it

We have discovered Shite Wear... sounds weird? It is!

 

What are ShiteShirts

 

A ShiteShirt is a quality casual dress shirt made with numerous outrageously weird and wonderful designs. ShiteShirts are born for the lottery-loving idiot in you. The wonder of Anti-Fashion, the marvel of Anti-Bespoke, your Shiteshirt will be completely random. There is no way to control the make-up, design, or fabric of your shirt. It might be slightly crazy. It may be disgusting. It will be Shite! It will change your life.

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AssemblyStudios's comment, August 31, 2012 12:12 PM
Ross has promised to come to work with one of these ;-)
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Kevin Griffin — Film

Kevin Griffin — Film | Assembly Blueprint | Scoop.it

Lovely short film - http://www.kevingriffinphoto.com/film.html


Via Ross Cunningham
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2012 Yeosu EXPO HYUNDAI MOTOR GROUP - Hyper-Matrix

Hyper-Matrix created by media artist group : J o n p a s a n g...
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iTypewriter: Yes, It’s An iPad Typewriter

iTypewriter: Yes, It’s An iPad Typewriter | Assembly Blueprint | Scoop.it

... Austin Yang designed the iTypewriter--a real, functioning typewriter that strikes its hammers right against the iPad’s Gorilla Glass keyboard instead of paper.

It’s all part of Yang’s obsession with “renovating” vintage equipment for modern day use. (His other uncompleted projects include a turntable and telephone.) But this isn’t a flea market hack; Yang designed the iTypewriter as a 3-D model, then passed it along to a Taiwanese prototyping factory to produce. The assembly itself took a month of tweaks--and that’s just on the working model you see here, which is actually Yang’s fourth attempt to build a working iPad typewriter.

He admits that the iTypewriter doesn’t solve any particular design problem (though, in a sense, it does solve the iPad’s horrific typing woes, if in a bulky, backwards manner). But that probably won’t stop it from being a massive success when it reaches Kickstarter in the coming days or weeks.

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Authentic Jobs charity: water Campaign 2011

Authentic Jobs charity: water Campaign 2011 | Assembly Blueprint | Scoop.it

The birr (Amharic ብር) is the unit of currency in Ethiopia. With a local partner, charity: water plans to serve 100% of Tigray (Northern Ethiopia) with access to clean water if they reach this year's goal.

 

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AssemblyStudios's comment, August 31, 2012 12:11 PM
... a very good website and an interesting project!
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Citymapper London

Citymapper London | Assembly Blueprint | Scoop.it

London transport made simple....Check out this app!


About Citymapper

We're building the ultimate urban transport app. Our goal is to completely reinvent the transport app and change how people move around cities.We believe in building useful and innovative products that fundamentally improve the quality of our lives.So far we've built Busmapper (iPhone App of the Week) and Citymapper (Apple Editor's Choice). Thousands of Londoners use our apps every day.We're a small dedicated team that's only getting started, located off Old Street Roundabout, in the heart of the London startup scene.

 

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AssemblyStudios's comment, August 31, 2012 12:12 PM
Look what Matt discovered!
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TED Blog | 5 rules for productive conflict

TED Blog | 5 rules for productive conflict | Assembly Blueprint | Scoop.it
Rob Manning did everything in his power to screw up the Curiosity rover’s landing on Mars last night. Manning not only cut radio signals to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s control room, but also simulated a hole being poked in the rover’s fuel system and solar flares flying toward the spacecraft.

Why would he do this?

Because he is the chief engineer for the rover mission, and wanted his team to be able to handle any worst-case scenario.

“Being a gremlin allows me to soul-search and look at all the things that I missed,” Manning told the Chicago Tribune in the days before last night’s landing.

Manning’s mischief would certainly get a thumbs up from management expert Margaret Heffernan. In a thought-provoking talk given at TEDGlobal 2012, Heffernan shared a counterintuitive lesson learned in her years running businesses and organizations — that conflict and opposition are essential for good thinking.

To make her point, Heffernan shared the story of Alice Stewart, an epidemiologist in England in the 1950s, who studied a steep uptick in the incidence of childhood cancer. Stewart made a startling discovery in her research — that children developing the disease were overwhelmingly born to mothers who had prenatal x-rays. Still, even with her research widely circulated, it still took more than 25 years for the medical establishment to listen to Stewart and abandon the practice of giving x-rays to pregnant women. Most people would have started to question their work. But Stewart stayed confident because she had a collaborator, statistician George Kneale, who actively tried to disprove her in any way he could — with zero success.

While our cultural zeitgeist tends to think of the ideal partners as two people thinking together — and doling out high fives at regular intervals — Heffernan says of Stewart and Kneale, “It’s a fantastic model of collaboration — thinking partners who aren’t echo chambers. I wonder how many of us dare to have such partners.”

In her talk, Heffernan shared a stunning statistic — that 85% of executives had concerns with their company that they were afraid to raise, out of fear of the conflict that would ensue. Heffernan warns that this not only means that businesses aren’t getting the best work out of their employees, but that issues which could be nipped in the bud internally perpetuate themselves.

So how do you foster conflict in businesses and science labs that leads to nimbler thinking rather than, say, a lot of yelling and hurt egos? After the jump, Heffernan shares her guidelines for productive disagreement.

 

1. Appoint a devil’s advocate. Someone whose excellence is demonstrated by the quality of questions they ask. Great questions include: “What are the best reasons not to do this?” “What don’t we know that, if we did know, would change our decision?” “If we had more money or time, what would we do?” “If this were a documentary, what would be the narrative arc?” It’s important that different people play the role of devil’s advocate: if it is always the same person, they’ll get tuned out — and burned out.

 

2. Find allies. If you have concerns, try asking others privately, “Are you okay with this? Does anything about this bother you? Is there another way to frame this question?” Having allies allows you to work together to be creative and solve the problem.

3. Listen for what is NOT being said. If the conversation is being framed about money, consider what is not being talked about. If everyone’s talking technology, what have they left out of their equation? Sometimes it’s helpful to bring in an outsider to help with this. They should do nothing but listen. Then, ask for their impressions — not recommendations. They may notice trends that people embroiled in the conversation simply can’t.

4. Imagine you cannot do what you all want to do. In other words, think about what you would do if you could fire someone, if you could change the timetable, or if you were allowed to cancel the deal. If you could do any of those things — would you still proceed with your plan? What are the hidden orthodoxies nobody is challenging?

 

5. After a decision is made, declare a cooling off period. Ask everyone to go home and think about the decision on their own as well as discuss it with their family. Come back after a prescribed amount of time and ask the group: does the decision still look great? Explains Heffernan, “All of these guidelines are neutral and designed to aid exploration rather than judgment. There’s never any reason not to try these — who doesn’t want to make better decisions?”

 

 

TED is a small nonprofit devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading -- through TED.com, our annual conferences, the annual TED Prize and local TEDx events.

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“Hinode” by Tetsuka Niiyama

“Hinode” by Tetsuka Niiyama | Assembly Blueprint | Scoop.it

Interesting animation - manages to be organic but abstract at the same time...

 


Via Ross Cunningham
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Living Furniture

Living Furniture | Assembly Blueprint | Scoop.it

Furniture comes to life in this exhibition at London College of Communication


Via Ross Cunningham
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Boundary Restaurant, Rooms and Rooftop

Boundary Restaurant, Rooms and Rooftop | Assembly Blueprint | Scoop.it
Boundary, a new project in Shoreditch, East London. Located in a converted Victorian warehouse, Boundary will offer 3 restaurants and bars, 17 guest bedrooms, a bakery and a food store.
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Supercut of One-Point Perspective Shots from Stanley Kubrick Films

Supercut of One-Point Perspective Shots from Stanley Kubrick Films | Assembly Blueprint | Scoop.it

A one-point perspective photograph is one in which there exists only a single vanishing point. Parallel lines in the scene all converge on that single point, leading away from the viewer. It can be used for interesting compositions, especially if that vanishing point is placed at the intersection points of the rule of thirds.

Filmmaker Stanley Kubrick has a habit of using one-point perspective for dramatic effect, often with the vanishing point in the dead center of the frame, disorienting the viewer and creating tension for his scenes. Film enthusiast kogonada recently took a bunch of Kubrick films, collected the shots showing this technique, and created the interesting supercut seen above.

You can find other example photos using one-point perspective over on Flickr. Here’s an example found on Wikipedia showing both techniques being used:

There’s also a really interesting discussion on the types of perspective. Did you know that there’s such thing as “zero point perspective”? It’s simply a photo that doesn’t contain any vanishing points. For example, some landscape photos of mountain ranges are considered to be zero point perspective.

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Conquer Big Creative Projects Using Past, Present, and Future Focus

Conquer Big Creative Projects Using Past, Present, and Future Focus | Assembly Blueprint | Scoop.it
In the past 25 days, I have written five chapters for my first book, which currently stands at 35,554 words of text. This writing has happened around also taking three out-of-town trips, working with clients, writing my newsletter, completing guest posts, giving virtual training courses, keeping in touch with family and friends, and still sleeping an average of 6.5 hours a night (the amount I need to be at my prime).At first, I feared that I might lose my typically peaceful approach to work because of the enormity of the project and the tight publisher's deadline. But by using the techniques described below, I've found it possible to manage a huge increase in my workload without becoming frantic.

Here are my secrets to using past, present, and future focus to tackle a large creative project with a fixed deadline:

 

Past Focus: When to Look Back

 

Big Picture: Looking backward plays a critical role in making your overall project plan. Before you begin, take some time to review any similar creative work. For example, if you were an illustrator taking on a new commission to illustrate a brochure, you might think back to a previous project in which you had to generate a similar volume of work. Then, based on the hard numbers from this past experience, you can estimate about how long you think it will take you to complete your current project and block out the time accordingly.

 

Day-to-Day: Once you have your overall plan in place, assess your actual versus estimated progress on a daily or weekly basis and adjust the plan accordingly. For instance, you could make a goal of finishing 1 of 10 illustrations this week and set aside 8 hours to do so based on your previous experience. If you get to the end of the week and haven't gotten the work done even though you put in 8 hours, you can decide how to allocate your hours the following week to finish the first drawing and keep on schedule for the other 9.

 

Present Focus: When to Get Lost in the Work

 

Big Picture: If you need to fit a huge project into a short timeframe, you can't just manage your time efficiently, you have to choose to invest it in your current top priorities. That usually means saying, "No," to anything other than must-do activities. I know this can be challenging so I'm using myself as an example to show it is possible: Although I have kept on top of all the essential items to keep my business running, I said, "No," to an offer of a monthly retainer to write for someone else's newsletter and, "No," to putting on a time management training that fell too close to my book deadline. My present focus helped me to avoid taking on anything that would divert my energy from what's truly most important now.

 

Day-to-Day: While it's important to discipline yourself to set boundaries around outside distractions, you must also ensure that your focus doesn't stray from your present work by self-generated ideas. If you're a graphic designer with a client website to finish, you'll need to choose not to make that optional update to your personal web portfolio right now, instead putting a reminder in your calendar to do it after your current deadline. Or maybe you're a musician on deadline to lay down album tracks, but you keep daydreaming about your release party. Try starting a document where you capture your ideas for the party but don't actually execute on the details until you have the music done.

 

Future Focus: When to Build a Bridge

 

Big Picture: Having a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow plays an absolutely essential role in keeping you motivated when you're having a really tough day, For me, one future-focus energy giver involves remembering my higher goal for the book, which is to empower more people to take back control of how they invest their time. Also, I've planned a REAL vacation, i.e. not working AT ALL, for the week after I turn in my manuscript. This highly satisfying and rejuvenating payoff immediately following my deadline provides an extra boost and gives me the psychological freedom to honestly tell my brain that there is a clear end in sight.

 

Day-to-Day: On a micro-level, you can use future focus when you notice that you're hesitating to wrap up and move on to the next portion of your work. If finishing seems like closing off options, you want to start to build the bridge before you've arrived at the precipice. Let's say you've just finished producing a conference, but there are a lot of loose ends to tie up. On a practical level, "building a bridge" might mean giving yourself permission to start to brainstorm potential speakers for the next conference before you've wrapped up all of the mundane details for this year's event. After doing this simple exercise, you usually have a greater capability to circle back and finish up your present work and flow effortlessly onto the next step.

 

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