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Rescooped by Rose Collins from Autism News
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Podcast: Jean Nicol: Autism eating solutions with The Eating Game

Podcast: Jean Nicol: Autism eating solutions with The Eating Game | Aspergers | Scoop.it
“ Jean Nicol, Nova Scotia - Jean is a retired Special Education Teacher, living in Nova Scotia, who loves spending her time being an advocate for those with autism.”
Via Autism Daily Newscast
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Rescooped by Rose Collins from Amazing Science
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Nobel Prize 2014 in Chemistry given for circumventing a basic law of physics, pushing the limits of microscopes

Nobel Prize 2014 in Chemistry given for circumventing a basic law of physics, pushing the limits of microscopes | Aspergers | Scoop.it
Three scientists, two American and one German, received this year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry for circumventing a basic law of physics and enabling microscopes to peer at the tiniest structures within living cells.The 2014 laureates, announced Wednesday by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, are Eric Betzig, 54, of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in Virginia; Stefan W. Hell, 51, of the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Germany; and William E. Moerner, 61, of Stanford University in California.For centuries, optical microscopes — those that magnify ordinary visible light — have allowed biologists to study organisms too small to be seen with the naked eye. But a fundamental law of optics known as the diffraction limit, first described in 1873, states that the resolution can never be better than half the wavelength of light being looked at.For visible light, that limit is about 0.2 millionths of a meter, or one-127,000th of an inch. A human hair is 500 times as wide. But a bacterium is not much larger than the size of the diffraction limit, and there was little hope of seeing details within the cell like the interaction of individual proteins. Other technology like the electron microscope, which generates images from beams of electrons instead of particles of light, achieves higher resolution, but it has other limitations, like requiring the sample to be sliced thin and placed in a vacuum. For biological research, that generally meant the subject of study had to be dead.At first glance, circumventing the diffraction limit would seem a foolish pursuit, like trying to invent a perpetual motion machine or faster-than-light travel — doomed by fundamental limits on how the universe works. Nonetheless, Dr. Hell, who was born in Romania, started working on the problem after finishing his doctorate at the University of Heidelberg in 1990. After failing to find financing in Germany to pursue his ideas, he obtained a research position at the University of Turku in Finland in 1993. A year later, he published his theoretical proposal for achieving sharper microscopic pictures.Dr. Hell’s insight was that by using lasers, he could restrict the glow to a very small section. That way, for structures smaller than the diffraction limit, “You can tell them apart just by making sure that one of them is off when the other is on,” he said in an interview.Other scientists could have just taken his proposal and made it work in the laboratory long before he did, he said, adding: “I was a sort of nobody in those days. I didn’t even have a lab, really. People could have taken it as a recipe, could have done it. But they didn’t do it. Why didn’t they do it? Because they thought it wouldn’t work that way.”
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by Rose Collins from Amazing Science
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Inside an animals mind: Crow Solves A Complicated 8 Step Puzzle

This Is Really Amazing: Dr. Alex Taylor has set up an 8-step puzzle to try and confuse one of the smartest crows he’s been studying in captivity. This bird solved the complex puzzle pretty quickly, even though he never saw the objects arranged together before. Watch the amazing experiment in this clip from the BBC’s ‘Inside the Animal Mind’.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Eli Levine's curator insight, April 24, 2014 8:02 PM

So YOU think you're the only one who's got "it".

 

Forget sentient life on other planets, we have plenty of it here.

 

And we're killing it off, for the sake of pieces of cloth rag that aren't essential to our survival and well being.

 

Who's the dummy now?

 

Think about it.

Rescooped by Rose Collins from Autism News
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UK eleven year old Aspergers boy competes for Christmas number one

UK eleven year old Aspergers boy competes for Christmas number one | Aspergers | Scoop.it
“ London, UK – A schoolboy with Aspergers who’s mother hadn’t heard him sing until last year is vying for the UK chart’s top spot with a song he composed himself.”
Via Autism Daily Newscast
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Rescooped by Rose Collins from Benedict Cumberbatch News
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Benedict Cumberbatch talks to James Rhodes about piano music - video

Benedict Cumberbatch talks to James Rhodes about piano music - video | Aspergers | Scoop.it
In this clip from More4's Piano Night , which will be broadcast on Saturday 3 August, James Rhodes plays piano and talks to actor Benedict Cumberbatch about his passion for classical music. Rhodes plays an extract from a favourite piece by Chopin and describes his piano as: 'Eighty-eight keys – and within that, an entire universe.' Click the title to jump to the site and see the clip.
Via Tee Poulson
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conchs82's comment, August 2, 2013 10:36 AM
Can't wait to see it. Have my VPN at the ready!
conchs82's comment, August 2, 2013 10:37 AM
I went to James Rhodes' show in SOHO last week. So cool!
Rescooped by Rose Collins from Personalize Learning (#plearnchat)
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Why Personalize Learning NOW

Why Personalize Learning NOW | Aspergers | Scoop.it
“ We asked teachers and those that know why personalize learning now. Connected Educators Month webinar with some transformational leaders.”
Via Kathleen McClaskey
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