Aspect 2 How Physical Therapy evolved (effects different generations)
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Above and Beyond on ADVANCE for Physical Therapy & Rehab Medicine

Above and Beyond on ADVANCE for Physical Therapy & Rehab Medicine | Aspect 2 How Physical Therapy evolved (effects different generations) | Scoop.it
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Matthew Loughner's comment, March 13, 2013 7:13 PM
Robotic Technology's Role: New movements to neurorehabilitation are being developed through the action of research. These new movements involve intense repetition and skill acquisition. These new therapies are very lengthy in time and are not commonly used for short term treatments and are limited to clinic visits. "Robotic therapy devices can provide consistent, repetitive therapy protocols, engage the patient through skill acquisition games, quantitatively measure performance, record progress and provide feedback for therapists." These new techniques preformed by robotic operations drops the price of dosage because these new techniques allows there to be automated or self-pacing therapy deliver.
Matthew Loughner's comment, March 13, 2013 7:20 PM
Robotic Technology's Role: There happen to be two types of these robotic therapy. One type consists of large, complex devices used for clinical research while the other involves simpler devices that are easy to use in clinics. The simpler devices allow the therapists and patients to communicate and interact when the patient is at their home. This is called telehab. Due to the new developments in technology, new physical therapy techniques occurred and allowed patients to enjoy therapy more and enables clinicians to focus on therapy planning instead of administrative tasks. Robotic therapy could lead to further development of future neuroscience research.
Matthew Loughner's comment, March 13, 2013 7:27 PM
This source is credible because it has an author that is a physical therapist and the article is part of a news magazine
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40691_ch01_final.pdf

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Matthew Loughner's comment, March 13, 2013 10:27 AM
Page 4: Throughout the years physical Therapy continued to develop. This was mainly due to the soldiers who endured injuries in the war and that were kept alive due to the advances in medicine. Being that these medicine kept more soldiers with injuries alive, there was greater need for physical therapist to help heal these injuries. This evolution caused trained physical therapist to develop educational and training programs that would lead physical therapy into becoming a profession. In 1967, the Social Security Act allowed there to be outpatient physical therapy services. This allowed physical therapy to expand treatment areas and to become more specialized in specific areas.
Matthew Loughner's comment, March 13, 2013 10:35 AM
Page 5: Physical Therapy has evolved to treat a vast variety of injuries and to prevent dehabilitation of with a large number of diseases. Physical Therapy is now world wide and can be found almost everywhere. In foreign countries physical therapy is called physiotherapy. Physical therapists first started out as technicians or extenders of prescribed health care back in the day are now highly trained doctors.
Matthew Loughner's comment, March 13, 2013 7:31 PM
This source is credible because it is for a non profit with education purpose and is from Jones and Bartlett Publishers, Journal, and PDF
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Teacher's Comments

Senior Research Project

 

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Tami Yaklich's comment, March 22, 2013 12:00 AM
Great job paraphrasing
Tami Yaklich's comment, March 22, 2013 12:00 AM
30/30
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History of Physical Therapy

History of Physical Therapy | Aspect 2 How Physical Therapy evolved (effects different generations) | Scoop.it
The techniques of physical therapy have changed tremendously in the last few decades. Read on to know about history of physical therapy.
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Matthew Loughner's comment, March 12, 2013 11:42 PM
Paragraph 5,6: In 1921 Mary McMillian who was the first physical therapy aide established the American Women's Physical Therapeutic Association. This Association was soon known as the American Physical Therapy Association. Mary McMillian continued to contribute to the reconstruction aide services, and this work earned her the nick name of The Mother of Physical Therapy. 1921 was the year that the field of Physical Therapy and physiotherapy was nationally accredited and introduced to the public. Soon after in 1924 "the Georgia Warm Springs Foundation was established to fight the polio epidemic." Until 1940s, the well known practices of physiotherapy were massage,exercise, and traction.
Matthew Loughner's comment, March 13, 2013 10:12 AM
Paragraph 6,7,8: In the early 1950s the introduction of manipulative therapy for spine and joint pain took place in the British Commonwealth countries. At this time the techniques and actions of physiotherapy was only performed in hospitals. Then in 1956, a various number of people who have some sort of background dealing with physical therapy joined together to work on the Salk Vaccine trials. These trials soon lead to the vaccine for polio. During this time physiotherapy was readily available to the public and became a common health care profession. In 1980 with development of computers more advancement took place in physical therapy such as the introduction of electrical stimulators and iontophoresis.
Matthew Loughner's comment, March 13, 2013 7:25 PM
This source is credible because it has an author and is peer reviewed
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Interview

Interview

Matthew Loughner's insight:

 Dear Dr. Rabs,
>
> Its Matthew Loughner and I have the questions for the interview for my senior research paper.  I have ten questions and I ll send five at a time.  I really appreciate you taking the time to be interviewed.  
>
> 1.  How has the technology of Physical Therapy evolve over the years? Probably the biggest change in technology over the years has been in how we seek information and record data .

When I first got into the field books were the means by which we obtained information. Now new information can be sought by powerful search engines on an almost continual basis. We now also do much of our documentation via a software program whereas initially documentation was done primarily on paper. Information gathering and according have definitely changed drastically in my career thus far.
>
> 2.  How are you introduced to new techniques of Physical Therapy when they are newly discovered?

New concepts in Physical therapy are most readily disseminated via literature reviews which can be done manually on a regular basis or set up to give you automatic feeds. Manual techniques are still best learned by onsite education provided by a skilled practioner
>
> 3.  How do you determine what exercises a patients does depending on his/her injury?

Understanding of both normal and abnormal anatomy, kinesiology, biomechanics and physiology is a good starting point. As above for many conditions different techniques have been investigated and evidence guides your practice. Last but not least the patients input and therapist past experience also serve as treatment guides.
>
> 4.  What are potential risks of Physical Therapy? 

PT is typically considered conservative care. So while the risks are those that might be commonly associated with exercise( sprain, strain, aggravating inflammation or other conditions of the body systems involved in movement - cardiovascular, pulmonary,musculoskeletal) - these risks are still often mild when compared vs other forms of care ie medicine or surgery
>
> 5.  Is manual adjustment more helpful than independent exercises?  Why? Neither. The literature has consistently shown that these 2 features in combination - manual treatment and exercise- offer the best results. 
>

6. What are some reasons why Physical Therapy is better than surgery?The best reason is that surgery is associated with risks such as infection or medical complications. Therapy also makes the patient a more active participant in their own care. that being said PT is insufficient in managing some conditions and surgery is the best option.
7. How does ice and stimulus help the muscles recover? In short they both help to modulate pain and minimize inflammation
8.How do you know to either use heat or ice on an injury?  Is one method better than the other?Both can be used for pain modulation. Ice is used most often in the 1st 48 hours after injury or after activity because it is superior to heat in controlling inflammation. 
9.What is the average amount of time that it takes for a minor injury to heal with Physical Therapy?  For example, what are some of the injuries and how long do they take to heal? It depends on the involved tissue and the degree of injury. 1st degree sprains/ strains are smaller and thus require less time 2-4 weeks; 2nd degree injuries may require an additional 2-4 weeks and 3rd degree sprains strains may take months or even require surgery depending on their location. Fracture may take 4-8 weeks to heal generally speaking
10.What are some examples of how Physical Therapy affects different generations?  For example, how does the exercises and injury differ from a young person compared to an older person? People may receive PT across the life span. We have pediatric clinicians who may see an infant shortly after birth for PT related to a congenital problem or birth related trauma. We also see folks in the last stages of their life to enable transfers and ambulation when getting up or walking have become a challenge. In between we see a variety of conditions in all different age groups with their rehab goals varying accordingly. For some folks it may be being able to climb a ladder at work, while for others a goal may be combing their hair or reaching in a cabinet. While for others it might be participating in a sport (such as swimming ) without limitations from pain. The key is identifying their impairments and how these are causing this patient to have activity restrictions and attacking it from all angles in order to allow the individual to participate in activities which are meaningful to them.


>
> Sincerely,
> Matthew Loughner  
>
> ________________________________
> From: "rabsshaw" <rabsshaw@gmail.com>
> To: mlswimmer7@comcast.net
> Sent: Monday, February 18, 2013 5:52:31 PM
> Subject: PT

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Matthew Loughner's comment, March 13, 2013 7:22 PM
His real name is Robert Shaw, his nickname is Rabs. That is what everyone calls him.
Tami Yaklich's comment, March 22, 2013 12:00 AM
Credentials? Contact info?