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General anesthesia Risks - Tests and Procedures - Mayo Clinic

General anesthesia Risks - Tests and Procedures - Mayo Clinic | Aspect 2 | Scoop.it
General anesthesia — Overview covers risks, results of this procedure to put you to sleep.
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There are may factors that may increase your risk of complications during surgery.  Some include smoking, obstructive sleep apnea, obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, heart, lungs or kidney conditions.  Also certain medications that cause excessive bleeding, heavy alcohol use, drug allergies, and or history of adverse reactions to anesthesia.

 

There are few factors that can cause patients to wake up during surgery.  Those include emergency surgery, cesarean surgery, depression, certain medications, heart or lung problems, daily alcohol use, lower anesthesia doses, and or errors by the anesthesiologist.  Errors by the anesthesiologist can occur when he or she is not watching the patients or measuring the amount of anesthesia the patients are given

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Concerns about anesthesia's impact on the brain

Concerns about anesthesia's impact on the brain | Aspect 2 | Scoop.it
As pediatric specialists become increasingly aware that surgical anesthesia may have lasting effects on the developing brains of young children, new research suggests the threat may also apply to adult brains. Researchers report that testing in laboratory mice shows anesthesia's neurotoxic effects depend on the age of brain neurons -- not the age of the animal undergoing anesthesia, as once thought.
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Researchers found that anesthetic drugs can cause neurons to degenerate. The newer the neuron is the more likely it is to degenerate which is why children are more commonly found with problems after anesthesia.  They concluded that the more anesthesia is used in a person's life the more brain cell death is common (when testing on animals) which leads to them questioning the same for human beings.  Although all taken in is true sometimes surgery is needed to save lives and sometimes those surgeries can not be done without anesthetics being used.

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Epidural anaesthesia: 8 things you need to know before opting for it - India.Com Health

Epidural anaesthesia: 8 things you need to know before opting for it - India.Com Health | Aspect 2 | Scoop.it
India.Com Health
Epidural anaesthesia: 8 things you need to know before opting for it
India.Com Health
Many women think that if the pain during labour becomes unbearable opting for an epidural anaesthesia can provide with much needed respite.
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An epidural, used during child labour, is used to manage labour pain.  The drug is injected into the cavity of the spinal cord called the dura. The nerves that signal to pain to the brain are blocked. They block pain but the ability to move is still intact so the baby can be delivered.

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Common Surgery Complications: Pain, Infection, Blood Clots, and More

Common Surgery Complications: Pain, Infection, Blood Clots, and More | Aspect 2 | Scoop.it
WebMD talks to experts about common surgery complications, including pain, infection, anesthesia effects, blood clots, and more.
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Common complications can range according to the surgery and the patient.  Pain, for example, is the least complicated.  The degree of pain depends on the surgical procedure performed.  Most patients who go through surgery will endure some type of pain.

 

A common complication is a partially collapsed lung also known as atelectasis.  When this complication occurs the patient is unable to fill their lungs with air and is unable to breathe.  This can cause the patient to have a build up of mucus that can cause pneumonia in some patients.  Signs of atelectasis can include shortness of breath and faster heart beats.

 

A common after surgery complication is blood clots.  Cots are most common after orthopedic operations.  People who smoke, morbidly obese, and immobile patients are the most at risk after surgical procedures.  Clots can move to your lungs where it can cause the patient to stop breathing after showing signs of swelling in the leg, calf pain, shortness of breath, and chest pain.

 

A common but very understated complication is fatigue and lack of energy.  General anesthesia can cause it for a long period of time and take awhile for a patient to return back to a normal energy level.  This is why some patients are advised not to return to work or physical activity.

 

A common surgical complication can be muscle atrophy.  This means that patients have had too much time in bed and not enough time using their muscles to regain full muscle capability.  This is sometimes why certain patients need physical therapy after they get a certain type of surgery done.

 

Anesthesia has its own side effect.  Some people may wake up feeling confused, nausea, sore throat, and or sleepiness.  Anesthesia stays in your system for 24 hours.  Doctors say that waking up in the middle of an operation is rare and doesn't usually happen.  Anesthesia is done so that patients have no memory of the operation.

 

Confusion is another common side effect.  This is what normally happens when a patient first wakes up and is sort of unclear about what is going on.  Some patients may experience delirium as well.  Delirium is more common within older patients for about a week but can continue for even a month.

 

Infection is another common complication.  Usually most infections are small around a site of the incision.  Some infections, although, can result in the death of the patient.  Some infections are hard to treat because they are antibiotic resistant which is what may cause the death.

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» Brain Effects of General Anesthesia - Psych Central

» Brain Effects of General Anesthesia - Psych Central | Aspect 2 | Scoop.it
New research is shedding light on the effects of general anesthesia on the brain and the body. In the United States, nearly 60,000 patients receive general
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When one is asleep their brain experiences normal cycles that are predictable while anesthesia involves the patient being forced to sleep and maintaing that sleep for an allotted area or time. Because of this general anesthesia is most commonly linked to being in a coma.  Knowing brain patterns and cycles during sleep and under anesthesia can help further knowledge about anesthetic drugs and their effects.

 

 

Some drugs that may be administered can lower brain activity which is why some patients can have hallucinations at low doses.  Doctors also found that the more activity the brain has the more unconscious one can get because of the brain patters and blocking signals.  Some of the symptoms and patterns that can occur can be almost seizure-like.

 

 

 

Some medications distributed can have more serious side effects.  These include breathing troubles, un normal blood-pressure, uneasy feelings, and vomiting (both are most common). These medications are very powerful and have a very small "safe spot" and can cause horrible events as a result.

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Understanding the anesthetized brain - MIT News Office

Understanding the anesthetized brain - MIT News Office | Aspect 2 | Scoop.it
Neuroscientist Emery Brown hopes to shed light on a longstanding medical mystery: how general anesthesia works.
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General anesthesia is similar to going to sleep or being in a coma. General anesthesia is defined as a "drug-induced" condition. Taking anesthetics you can experience unconsciousness, amnesia, pain numbing, and inability to move in parts or in whole. Anesthetic drugs can not interrupt common body functions such as respiration, circulation, and temperature regulation.

 

 

When going under anesthesia it is like falling  asleep but it has differences. When sleeping your brain goes through three stages all with a distinctive pattern. None of these patterns have been portrayed when your brain is under general anesthesia. General anesthesia is more like and reversible coma.

 

 

Problems can occur when regular breathing comes back, you can move parts that are supposed to be blocked, and cognition. It takes longer to come back after a coma then anesthesia. Most have a loss of consciousness when under anesthetics.

 

 

 

Authors have written about "paradoxical excitation". This phenomenon is what some believe as when anesthetics increase brain activity. This is also why some people can experience hallucinations under certain drugs such as ketamine.

 

 

 

A professor concluded that such anesthetics are potent.  They can cause respiratory depression (stopping of breathing), loss of protective airway reflexes, blood pressure instability, and nausea and vomiting. Doctors and researchers are still trying to find better ways to understand general anesthetics.

 

 

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