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IRE (Irreversible Electroporation)

IRE (Irreversible Electroporation) | Aspect 2 and 3 | Scoop.it
IRE, or irreversible electroporation, is a new minimally invasive surgical technique that selectively kills tumor cells by using electrical fields to make holes in cell membranes. Our utilization of the newly developed IRE technology to treat patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer constitutes the first use of IRE tumor ablation to treat the typically fast-growing and fatal cancer that occurs in the pancreas.
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(Aspect 3) Since IRE is minimally invasive from a surgical standpoint, the recovery to be extremely quick.  The damage on tissues is reduced by a large amount with this surgery as well.  This procedure always at least will improve the patients life in the short run.

 

(Aspect 3)  NanoKnife is the high tech system that is approved by the FDA is what creates IRE to allow this surgery.  This is being used in tumors contained within the lung, kidney, liver, and prostate.  The precision of this system allows for high efficient work.  It also allows for other normal cells in the area to remain unharmed.

 

(Aspect 3)  The human anatomy allows for organs to get rid of the dead cells and be replaced with new healthy cells.  Also since NanoKnife does not heat up or become extremely cold, tissues cannot be damaged by temperatures during the procedure.  The value of this system in medicine increases dramatically because of these features.

 

(Aspect 3)  NanoKnife is actually not a knife at all.  It is nanotechnology at its finest work.  It deals with things all the way down to an atomic level.  This includes particles and dimensions which allows it to be so accurate and precise.

 

(Aspect 3)  Steel needle like probes is connected to a generator that creates electrical impulses.  These impulses can be controlled by a foot pedal.  The probes themselves must be disposable for health reasons.  With these impulses the cell can die in normal fashion and be disposed of the body the natural way.

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Biomedical Engineers Use Electric Pulses To Destroy Cancer Cells

Biomedical Engineers Use Electric Pulses To Destroy Cancer Cells | Aspect 2 and 3 | Scoop.it
Biomedical engineers have developed a new minimally invasive method of treating cancer, and they anticipate clinical trials on individuals with prostate cancer will begin soon.
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(Aspect 3) Irreversible electroporation (IRE),  is a process invented by two engineers named Rafael V. Davalos and Boris Rubinsky.  Both are apart of faculty in Bioengineering or Biomedical engineering. Davalos is involved in Wake Forest University School of Biomedical Engineering and Science (SBES). Rubinsky is a professor in bioengineering at University of California, Berkeley.

 

(Aspect 3) Electroporation increases permeability of a cell. It changes overall from no permeability to reversible opening and finally to irreversible opening. In irreversible opening the cell eventually dies.  These two engineers installed the concept of irreversible openings to cancer cells.

 

(Aspect 3) "IRE removes tumors by irreversibly opening tumor cells through a series of short intense electric pulses from small electrodes placed in or around the body," (Davalos). "This application creates permanent openings in the pores in the cells of the undesirable tissue.(Davalos).  The openings eventually lead to the death of the cells without the use of potentially harmful chemotherapeutic drugs."(Davalos).

 

(Aspect 3) Other methods have already been established like using heat or freezing.  The drawback with these methods is that they can cause harm  to healthy tissues that exist or leave malignant cells.  "We did not use any drugs, the cells were destroyed, and the vessel architecture was preserved," Davalos said.


(Aspect 3) IRE is cheap compared to other surgical techniques of today.  Another advantage is that is very minimally invasive to the patient and local blood flow does not change its outcome. IRE is looking more and more towards advancing in the future.

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Khalifa University a site for biomedical innovation - The National

Khalifa University a site for biomedical innovation - The National | Aspect 2 and 3 | Scoop.it
Khalifa University a site for biomedical innovation The National Biomedical engineering is still an emerging field and Prof Laursen said there was still work to be done to educate future students as to its value in medical device development and...
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Professor Laursen has claimed  that biomedical engineering continues to be an upcoming and innovative field to go into.  Upcoming students need to learn the value of such an emerging field (The National).

 

With a newer career field comes misunderstanding of that field.  Dr Kinda Khalaf, who is the head of the biomedical engineering department at Khalifa University, has said “People still don’t know enough about it and the majority of hospitals still think our graduates are going to be technicians, but that’s not what it is. We do everything from genetics to robotics and are very multidisciplinary – sitting between engineering, medicine and science.”(The National).

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Biomedical Engineers : Occupational Outlook Handbook : U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Biomedical Engineers : Occupational Outlook Handbook : U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics | Aspect 2 and 3 | Scoop.it
Biomedical engineers analyze and design solutions to problems in biology and medicine, with the goal of improving the quality and effectiveness of patient care.
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Meet a Biomedical Engineer: LifeWorks

Find out how a biomedical engineer applies his love of physics and engineering to study the movement of patients with cerebral palsy. Discover how he uses in...
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If you find interest in the career of biomedical engineering some subjects to begin with are higher level math, physics, and anatomy in high school and then more advanced as you move further into college.

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Research project aimed at improving cancer treatment - Medical Xpress

Research project aimed at improving cancer treatment - Medical Xpress | Aspect 2 and 3 | Scoop.it
Medical Xpress Research project aimed at improving cancer treatment Medical Xpress Under the supervision of renowned biomedical engineer Robert Burrell, Matthew Nickel is working on a new device that could give surgeons important information about...
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Biomedical engineering’s 'sweet spot' | UNSW Newsroom

Biomedical engineering’s 'sweet spot' | UNSW Newsroom | Aspect 2 and 3 | Scoop.it
Strong role models key to record number of young women studying biomedical engineering @UNSW #IWD2014 @DailyLifeAu
http://t.co/qImTR0qrEg
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At UNSW this upcoming year, a jaw dropping number came across the desk of the Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering.  First preference biomedical engineering students had increased by almost 40% compared to the year prior (unsw.edu).

 

 

Not only did it increase overall but more women applied for it as well.  It actually increased by 30% for women alone in one year (unsw.edu).

 

One of the roles of Professor Knothe Tate is to build a connection between the career opportunity and the school itself. This will create a  very strong job placement for the school in this field.  Knothe says this because he believes "The field of biomedical engineering is in a real sweet spot right now."  

 

 

 

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Biomedical Engineers Job Description - YouTube

Biomedical Engineers Job Description
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Doctors can see into a patients organs with new imaging systems, create organs and limbs that are artificial, also surgical tools such as lasers for surgeries are all innovations and creations of biomedical engineers.

 

For areas of work you can be sure to be in research laboratories run by hospitals, universities, or the government.  You may spend extremely extended amounts of time on single projects that could last years.

 

Some necessities for the job are patience and determination to make the lives of patients better.  Others include problem solving skills and ability to handle very intricate math. 

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Biomedical Engineers

Biomedical Engineers | Aspect 2 and 3 | Scoop.it
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Apply concepts of biology, engineering, and biomechanical to further develop and evaluate systems of the body.  This includes care deliver systems, health management, medical systems, and artificial limbs or organs. (Bureau of Labor Statistics)

 

 

 

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