Aspect 2 Character Modeling & Aspect 3 Motion Programming
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Motion - Game Programming

Motion - Game Programming | Aspect 2 Character Modeling & Aspect 3 Motion Programming | Scoop.it
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Brandon Thoma's comment, March 25, 2014 12:21 PM
Motion programing is the most complicating out of the three aspects highlighted. This deals with a ton of computer talk so you can communicate the input of what the player wants done to what the output of what the game actually does. This is the one that takes a good amount of time and schooling to actually fully do.
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Motion Capture Ready to Bring Next-Gen Avatars to Gaming, Movies, Medicine, the Military and More (With Video!)

Motion Capture Ready to Bring Next-Gen Avatars to Gaming, Movies, Medicine, the Military and More (With Video!) | Aspect 2 Character Modeling & Aspect 3 Motion Programming | Scoop.it
For his biweekly "Buzzword" column, PM’s senior tech editor subjects himself to a new version of the F/X rig you’ve seen before.
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Brandon Thoma's comment, March 6, 2014 12:26 PM
Mo-cap has one flaw in its workings and that would be correctly mapping the normal flow the face goes through while talking and expressing emotions. The actor would have to stand in front of the specialized cameras with capture dots painted all over his face so the computer can map out his face when he's going through the script of the game and then it will be later mapped onto the skin of the character in the game so in the end the character will have natural flows in the face.
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Making Of The Last Of Us - Motion Capture - Bill Scene - Side by Side Comparison - YouTube

I love these little making of clips.
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Brandon Thoma's comment, March 6, 2014 12:18 PM
note they are acting everything out and also the dialog
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5 Plot Devices That Make Good Video Games Suck

5 Plot Devices That Make Good Video Games Suck | Aspect 2 Character Modeling & Aspect 3 Motion Programming | Scoop.it
Video game makers are working hard to achieve their dream of a playable movie, or at least a game that looks like a movie in a two-minute trailer. And it works, until you hit the start button.
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Brandon Thoma's comment, March 4, 2014 12:34 PM
Games with unwanted and unneeded 'busy work' for friends really makes the game drag and feel like a grind. "You do favors for friends in real life because we enjoy their company." In games a lot of times the friend missions are just not needed and add nothing to the story, you really want to have the friends and family interaction to reveal more of either your plot and the bigger story or help to add depth to the main character.
Brandon Thoma's comment, March 4, 2014 12:37 PM
Some more fillers in games are the little objectives that are randomly thrown into your way to just delay your progression to the main story and is just simply an annoying inconvenience, most offer no help to the story or plot or character and are just simply to make the game longer. Lots of gamers do not want those.
Brandon Thoma's comment, March 4, 2014 12:40 PM
Gamers judge their games, somewhat, by how long the game is. That is an extremely hard task in the game world to create a long game and have the plot and story not feel like it is thrown in there for nothing, a lot of planning and structure is put behind these stories to make if feel like its movie quality but yet again will need "side quests" thrown in as there own little stories inside the larger one to help the game seem longer.
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How to Design and Vector a Set of Character Poses for a Video Game - Tuts+ Design & Illustration Tutorial

How to Design and Vector a Set of Character Poses for a Video Game - Tuts+ Design & Illustration Tutorial | Aspect 2 Character Modeling & Aspect 3 Motion Programming | Scoop.it
In this tutorial we will look at how to design a character for a video game, in this case a "beat 'em up". We will work from the very first sketch to the final artwork. I will share my process and workflow for drawing vector characters with lots of tips, tricks and shortcuts to use in your everyday vector workflow.
Lets get started! | Difficulty: Advanced; Length: Long; Tags: Character Design, Vector, Illustrator
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Brandon Thoma's comment, March 3, 2014 12:32 PM
You could and or would create a sketch inside the design software on your computer and create the full sketch of the character in that and then later go back in and officially draw him and color him and give it personality.
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How to create character models for games: 18 top tips | 3D modelling | Creative Bloq

How to create character models for games: 18 top tips | 3D modelling | Creative Bloq | Aspect 2 Character Modeling & Aspect 3 Motion Programming | Scoop.it

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By Antony Ward

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Brandon Thoma's comment, March 3, 2014 12:49 PM
When designing your characters you got to keep in mind all the restrictions you would have enforced on you, as an example would be the restriction of the environment of the game and scale of the worlds it will be in, you don't want an ant sized character inside a game meant for a giant. So your measurement needs to stay constant as well.
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How developers are trying to solve motion sickness in video games

How developers are trying to solve motion sickness in video games | Aspect 2 Character Modeling & Aspect 3 Motion Programming | Scoop.it
In an industry banking on the draw of realistic visuals and dizzingly-paced action sequences, motion sickness is not uncommon. How serious of an issue it is varies from game to game and player to...
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Brandon Thoma's comment, March 25, 2014 12:15 PM
Dying Light, a new game coming onto the now current generation consoles, is a zombie killing free world game with parkour aspects, which suddenly makes the game have more violent motion movements, causing it to be horrible on our senses. A second addition onto that this first-person game allows you to see your full body as in arms, body, and legs further more throwing off our visual senses with how our mind will react to the screen moving.
Brandon Thoma's comment, March 25, 2014 12:17 PM
A perfect quote from the site is,"YOUR BRAIN FEELS UNCOMFORTABLE WHEN YOU SEE CERTAIN MOVEMENTS ON CAMERA, BUT YOUR INNER EAR DOESN'T GET THE SIGNAL." Perfectly explains how our brain negatively reacts.
Brandon Thoma's comment, March 25, 2014 12:18 PM
This is a problem every motion programer will face when creating games and it could really break the game if not fixed or addressed in the creation stage.
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Realism and Motion Capture in Video Games

Realism and Motion Capture in Video Games | Aspect 2 Character Modeling & Aspect 3 Motion Programming | Scoop.it
Technology keeps updating and innovating in the realm of video games. It’s become an expectation for graphics to improve, but do better graphics mean more realism? Since the transition to more powe...
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Brandon Thoma's comment, March 5, 2014 12:46 PM
Mo-cap is really just actors getting scanned so the game can have the most truthful actions that mirror their actions so the motions in game looks realistic.
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Writing for the Gaming Industry

Writing for the Gaming Industry | Aspect 2 Character Modeling & Aspect 3 Motion Programming | Scoop.it
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Brandon Thoma's comment, March 4, 2014 12:44 PM
A writer in a video game really sets the sketch for the entire game itself, from the story all the way to the levels and characters. The writer has to go fully in depth with everything and have an extreme amount of details to make sure the graphic designers have enough to go off of to create the virtual world the writer was hoping to get.
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Character Development for Video Games

'Character Development for Video Games' NASSCOM Game Developers Conference 2012 Talk by Kshiraj Telang
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Brandon Thoma's comment, March 3, 2014 12:37 PM
In a game actually designing is only one step in modeling a character inside a virtual world.
Brandon Thoma's comment, March 3, 2014 12:40 PM
You have to understand what the character is going to be and how it is going to act inside your game. Will he/she/it be an avatar that has no story (COD avatar)? One that has a large backstory (Uncharted)? Or will it be completely up to the player (Sims)?
Brandon Thoma's comment, March 3, 2014 12:42 PM
Then you got to figure out how this character will be portrayed artistically, will it be realistic? Semi-realistic? Or completely cartoonish? Then will it be cute, tough, goofy, etc?
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Motion capture: Moving with the times

Motion capture: Moving with the times | Aspect 2 Character Modeling & Aspect 3 Motion Programming | Scoop.it
Guides to game development tools and technology
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Brandon Thoma's comment, March 5, 2014 12:28 PM
Motion capture is a huge and very in depth way of making a video game. Large rooms or even warehouses are outfitted with the highly advanced cameras to capture the motion the actors or even stuntmen are doing in the warehouse.
Brandon Thoma's comment, March 5, 2014 12:29 PM
The Xbox's Kinect can now bring that tech into our own houses.
Brandon Thoma's comment, March 5, 2014 12:31 PM
This tech can be used to capture the largest of movements to the smallest movements, like how the human face moves to certain words or faces, this tech can track that from various lengths away and its starting to become more advanced that they can start using lesser cameras.