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Aftermath of the Rana Plaza Tragedy: Social and Health Issues Emerge Amid Struggle for Workers’ Rights

Aftermath of the Rana Plaza Tragedy: Social and Health Issues Emerge Amid Struggle for Workers’ Rights | Asian Labour Update | Scoop.it

In the coming months, it is extremely critical to continue to struggle for workers’ rights, both at the national and international levels, including encouraging the formation of robust and independent trade unions.  It is also critical to provide comprehensive services and long-term care for workers unable to financially support themselves or their families.  Fundraising efforts need to focus on building the capacity of organizations to be able to provide long-term care for workers.  Symbolic as it may seem, there must be a place where workers can collectively mourn and heal from the trauma of this senseless tragedy in the form of a memorial.

As one sign reads at the site, the workers who died here are “shaheed” or their lives bear witness to this tragedy.  Let us, too, not forget them.

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A new Shenzhen? Poor Pakistan fishing town's horror at Chinese plans

A new Shenzhen? Poor Pakistan fishing town's horror at Chinese plans | Asian Labour Update | Scoop.it

Mega-port will bring five-star hotels and Chinese access to Arabian Sea, as residents in conflict-torn province contend with lack of water and food

Gwadar is poor. When a house was recently burgled in the fishing settlement on Pakistan’s desert coast, the only items stolen were cans of fresh water – a staple that has soared in value since reservoirs dried up. It lies in Balochistan, a province in the grip of a long-running separatist insurgency and Pakistan’s most neglected.

Yet local officials dream of a future where Gwadar becomes a second Shenzhen, the Chinese trade hub bordering Hong Kong. Visitors are told that with Chinese investment the small settlement will become a major node of world commerce boasting car factories, Pakistan’s biggest airport and a string of five-star resort hotels along Gwadar’s sparkling seafront.

But residents are aghast, and not just because the fishing community, long settled on the neck of the peninsula, will be moved to new harbours up to 40km away.

“This is all being done for China, not the people,” said Elahi Bakhsh, a fisherman bewildered by the plans to turn Gwadar into China’s deepwater access point to the Arabian Sea.

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Awami Workers Party condemns murder of PIA workers in Karachi, Pakistan

Press Release:

Awami Workers Party Pakistan condemns murder of PIA workers in Karachi


The Awami Workers Party strongly condemns state violence against workers of the Pakistan International Airlines on Tuesday in which at least two workers in Karachi were killed and scores were tear-gassed, beaten up and injured. The AWP also condemns the imposition of the barbaric Essential Services Maintenance Act to stamp out the workers’ right to protest for their rights. The party has called for a protest in solidarity with PIA workers at Charing Cross at 3pm on February 3.


It is necessary to point out that all regimes have attempted to privatise PIA and exploit it for their own political and economic interests.The reasons given to us for the privatisation of the national carrier - incompetence, wasteful expenditure, declining service standards, gross mismanagement - are a result of usurious myopic policies of successive regimes.


Yet, all research into the privatization of public assets since the 90s demonstrates how the process has been marred by corruption, cronyism, asset-stripping, as well as aggravating social problems such as unemployment. In bizarre irony, the political elite of the country, which has used public institutions for financial gains and petty electoral considerations, have been handed over the responsibility of overseeing the “transparent handing over” of Pakistan’s national assets. Without an accountability process of the highly dubious previous privatization projects, once again, it is the ordinary workers and ordinary citizens who will face the brunt of the elite’s economic mismanagement.


More importantly, if crucial policy decisions affecting millions of citizens are not presented in front of the public for a thorough debate,and instead are decided by technocrats from the IMF, it will raise serious questions on the efficacy of a parliament allegedly representing the “will of the people”.


The government’s attempts to bundle-off and privatise segments of the Water and Power Development Authority have only served to highlight the failure of a neoliberal capitalist system.


The argument that privatisation will make ‘lumbering’ state-owned enterprises more efficient has fallen on its own merit with the case of power supply companies. Yet the Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz government is going ahead with an aggressive gamble in privatising the PIA.


The brunt of this failed experiment being repeated over and over again falls on the workers. Now with the right to strike and protest taken away, the space to even demonstrate dissent against these myopic policies is being stamped out.


The AWP demands that the government revoke the draconian Essential Services Maintenance Act and holds the government and rangers accountable for the usage of force against the workers.

The AWP demands an immediate end to failed austerity and privatisation policies and expresses complete solidarity with the striking workers who are demanding nothing but a life of dignity.


Awami Workers Party

Ph: 0300 8433173

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A model for dynamic collective bargaining provisions for women workers

A model for dynamic collective bargaining provisions for women workers | Asian Labour Update | Scoop.it

The problems faced by women workers in the Philippines vary across sectors. Sexual harassment is more pronounced in the broadcast and hospital and healthcare than in other industries. In the garments manufacturing industries, women workers complain about poor ventilation. On the other hand, in hotels and restaurants, women’s issues are centred on the unjust treatment of women who have just gone through pregnancy. They are usually forced to go back to work even if the maternity leave is not fully utilised yet. Women workers in the metal working industry raise OSH and job security issues like poor ventilation, personal protective equipment, exposure to chemicals, limited mobility, heavy physical work, and short-term contract arrangements.


Although some unions are able to secure the rights of women workers, there is still much to be done. For instance, unions try to fight for the inclusion in collective bargaining agreements of women workers’ rights that are not legally mandatory such as menstrual leaves, lactation spaces, safe working environment, and day care for the children of workers. Meanwhile, unions are also expected to be able to negotiate for better terms of maternity leaves and benefits, work hours and compensation, and health and gynaecological services. Mere knowledge of the laws for women does not guarantee union representatives the ability to effectively articulate the interest of women workers; union members and leaders should be educated constantly to increase awareness on women’s issues and rights and enhance gender sensitivity.

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On the Corporate Capture of Sharing

Disruption as a result of new technology is not novel, even in a capitalist economy, like the steam engine and the spinning jenny in the olden times, or the more recent development of robotics in the 1970’s or computers in the 1980’s. All the new technologies disrupted the existing processes and the early adaptors benefitted from the technological advantage over the competition. In short, they make a lot of money by being hipsters. Just check how big AirBnB is now compared to traditional hotel chains and one can see how this sharing economy is making a lot of profit for a few people, while those who provide the service remains part of the precariat. So what happened to the whole idea of sharing? Disrupted.

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Workers’ Struggle amid Capital Mobility (A Short Training Module for Workers)

Workers’ Struggle amid Capital Mobility (A Short Training Module for Workers) | Asian Labour Update | Scoop.it

This education module on capital mobility explains the capitalist crisis, and assesses the impact of capital mobility on workers and trade unions. The module also provides stories of workers in the global supply chains and their struggles.

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Indonesia's Oldest EPZ disrupted by General Strike

Indonesia's Oldest EPZ disrupted by General Strike | Asian Labour Update | Scoop.it

On 24 and 25 Nov 2015, workers assembled during General Strike at Nusantara Bonded Zone, in Cakung, East Jakarta, Indonesia. The strike has disrupted the operation of the zone, known as one of the workplaces that are most exploitative with slave-like working condition. 


Nusantara Bonded Zone, established in 1986, is the oldest Indonesia’s Export Processing Zone (EPZ). EPZs, historically often labelled Free Trade Zones (FTZs), and more recently, Special Economic Zones (SEZs), have been and continue to be one of the most striking phenomena in the global capitalist system.

 

‪#‎GeneralStrike‬ in Indonesia [24-27 Nov 2015]

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Indonesian workers strike against new pay regulations

Indonesian workers strike against new pay regulations | Asian Labour Update | Scoop.it
JAKARTA — Thousands of Indonesian workers rallied in several cities on Tuesday to demand the government repeal a new rule that they say limits pay increases.
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An Arrest during Protest Rally against Wage Regulation in Indonesia: A Chronology (October 30, 2015)

An Arrest during Protest Rally against Wage Regulation in Indonesia: A Chronology (October 30, 2015) | Asian Labour Update | Scoop.it

You! Get down! All of you get down from the car! Are you going to get down or not? You are dogs!" shouted several of the police around the FBTPI commando car while continuing to use the bamboo sticks. I looked at them. They were wearing brown shirts with brown pants. That was the first time I had seen that uniform. Then I saw Fresly Manulang wounded, blood flowing from his forehead. I braced myself and glanced towards the front seat of the Commando car. Jumisih was not there. I saw police hanging on to the commando car while kicking in the glass on the left side of the car. I remembered Galita who had been sitting in the passenger seat. I wondered if the little girl Aini was with her mother, Galita, there? Finally we decided to get off the commando car, the police were pulling us down. They punched Asmir’s right eye and hauled him down. Manulang was also punched on the head and dragged down. I was pulled down off the car but they did not punch me because I am a woman. Ironic isn’t it? I looked around again, there was no Jumisih, and what about Ari Widiastari, was he safe with his camera? What about Atin with her camera? How about the other comrades? Bamboo. FBLP, Godam, LPB, FSPMI, Forum PUK, SPSI, SPN and the others. I hold my bag tightly, handphone inside, so as not to allow it to be taken by the police.


More detail: http://amrc.org.hk/content/arrest-during-protest-rally-against-wage-regulation-indonesia-chronology-october-30-2015

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[Indonesia] Union Busting at Honda: State & Company in Partnership

[Indonesia] Union Busting at Honda: State & Company in Partnership | Asian Labour Update | Scoop.it
In April 2015, more than 3000 workers employed at the Honda Prospect Motor plant in Karawang, Indonesia held a mass meeting to declare the establishment of their union, SERBUK HPM. However, five of the union’s leaders have now been suspended by Honda in a classic case of union busting. The workers are fighting both the government and company for union recognition.
Kerly, one of the suspended workers, explains that it was in early 2015 that he and other Honda workers first started thinking about forming a union. Unionised workers at nearby factories had told them about their own experiences of winning better conditions.
At Honda a union already existed, but it was run by the company. Membership was compulsory and the fee was deducted automatically from the workers’ pay each month. From these fees the company union was raking in around 50 million rupiah per month, but was doing nothing for the workers. 

When workers were fired, the union leaders told the workers to take the severance pay and not fight the dismissals. They also never encouraged the workers to fight for higher wages. The workers at Honda are paid considerably less than the 4,000,000 rupiah wages of workers at other large automobile plants. They also face the issue of contract work, in which the company keeps workers on short term contracts allowing them to fire workers easily.

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Guangdong workers protest outside Tommy Hilfiger over labour dispute with Hong Kong bosses

Guangdong workers protest outside Tommy Hilfiger over labour dispute with Hong Kong bosses | Asian Labour Update | Scoop.it

Three Guangdong factory workers and labour rights activists staged a demonstration outside the Tommy Hilfiger flagship store in Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong on Wednesday (09/30) asking the American clothes brand to pay their overdue severance after one of its contractors in Guangdong closed down. The workers said their Hong Kong bosses disappeared after the sudden closure of Huizhou SKS Manufacturing Company Limited in March this year. The trio, on behalf of about 100 workers, demanded Tommy Hilfiger, which was 80 percent of the factory’s businesses, to pay their severance, according to the labour rights NGO Globalisation Monitor. Globalisation Monitor and two other labour rights NGOs, Scholars Against Corporate Misbehaviour and Asian TNC Monitoring Network, are helping the workers.

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Former Peer of Samsung Vice Chairman Lee Urges Him to Negotiate With Occupational Disease Victims

Former Peer of Samsung Vice Chairman Lee Urges Him to Negotiate With Occupational Disease Victims | Asian Labour Update | Scoop.it
A French scholar who took an MBA course about 20 years ago in Japan with Lee Jae-yong (also known as "Jay)", vice chairman and the heir apparent of Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., urged Mr. Lee to negotiate with victims of the company's occupational disease cluster. In an open letter posted on Facebook Sept. 14, Paul Jobin, associate professor…
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Training Manual - Workplace Hazards and Reproductive Health of Women Workers in China

Training Manual - Workplace Hazards and Reproductive Health of Women Workers in China | Asian Labour Update | Scoop.it
This training manual was produced by China Labor Support Network (CLSN) for their training workshop on the Reproductive Health of Women workers in the garments and electronics manufacturing industries, mainly because of the higher concentration of women employees in these industries.
 
To facilitate further probing into and the unearthing of more dimensions on women workers’
reproductive health problems, this workshop also shed light on the applications of epidemiology
in this issue, together with some examples.
 
The manual draws on the Chinese context and includes specific statistics and regulations relevant to this context.
 
We hope that friends working with women workers and advocating gender equity can adapt it to their own contexts and benefit from it.
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The development of the labour dispute in Mizutani, Disney’s Supplier

The development of the labour dispute in Mizutani, Disney’s Supplier | Asian Labour Update | Scoop.it

The development of the labour dispute in Mizutani (Shenzhen) Toy Factory Co. Ltd., Japan Disney's supplier:

  • Mid 2014, the employer moved some machinery to its branch in the Philippines. Workers put out a notice, asking the enterprise to explain such a move but it was ignored.

 

  • Since October 2014, workers have been not required to work overtimes. Their monthly wages was 1,808 yuan and after deducting social insurance premiums, the income became very low. The less senior workers left the factory and the factory did not recruit new workers to replace them.

 

  • In the afternoon of 16 January 2015, workers launched a strike. At that time, their boss was not in China. Mr Mizutani negotiated with workers between 20 Jan and 22 Jan. He went missing again on 22 Jan.

 

  • On 24 January, the enterprise put out a notice, calling for a negotiation between workers and a consultancy, which represented the enterprise, on 26 Jan.

 

  • On 26 January, the negotiation failed and the enterprise posted a notice, demanding the workers to resume working before 30 Jan or they would be dismissed “for absenteeism”  without compensation.

 

  • On 30 January, a new round of negotiation reached mutual agreement.

 

  • On 31 January, workers resumed working

 

  • On 1 February, the workers' representatives received a notice by fax, informing them that the compensation of each year’s services would be 1,000 yuan. The representatives did not believe that such a reply was coming from their boss. Some stated their objections and demanded the yearly compensation to be 1,808 yuan (the legal minimum wages). They signed and faxed their feedback to mr Mizutani.

 

  • On 2 February, other workers read the notice in the factory and were outraged. They protested in the streets outside the factory complex. Within minutes, police forced workers to return to the factory and detained 15 people on spot. Later the police detained another 6 people in the factory, including women workers who were injured in the clashes. A total of 21 workers were detained. Workers were forced by the police to delete all the photos they had taken.

 

  • At 2.30pm, the Japanese employer announced through an internet meeting, that he could only compensate workers their severance compensation on the basis of 300 yuan per year of services. He later offered 500 yuan  compensation per year of services but demanded workers to resign and a clear-cut termination of their labour relations.

 

  • 15 workers were released that evening, but the 6 workers who had been detained in the factory were held in custody.

 

  • On 3 February, one worker was released in the morning while the other 5 were administratively detained for 5 days. The labour bureau threatened workers that if they would not return to work the next day, the 5 workers would be detained for even longer. Workers could not stop the shipment that afternoon and to speed up the release of the 5 workers, they agreed to resume working the next day.

 

  • In April, workers wrote a joint-petition to complain about forced dismissal. The Walt Disney sent a facilitator to come up with an agreement with the enterprise.

 

  •  At 5pm, 18 June, the enterprise announced its closure, quoting business difficulties. It demanded workers to sign an agreement to terminate their labour relations by 12 noon the next day. The agreement claimed it was achieved on the basis of “unanimity through consultation”. Workers were also asked to move out from their dormitory before 23 June.

 

  • On 19 June, workers' protest was in vain. All workers signed the agreement to terminate their labour relations. They identified some problems after receiving the severance payment. Workers' representatives collected and compiled the workers' demands and labour organization called for Disney's intervention.

 

  • On 17 July, a Hong Kong NGO, Disney and Mizutani held a meeting.

 

  • On 5 August, Disney replied that it had found workers' demands groundless after its investigation.

 

  • 7 August, Mizutani workers wrote to Disney, demanding it to compensate them on behalf of Mizutani, as follows:


1. Mizutani unilaterally terminated workers’ labour contracts. Legally speaking, it should pay a double-severance compensation and Disney should pay for the missing part of the compensation;

 

2. Mizutani closed the factory down without giving an one-month written notice prior closure, thus, it should compensate its workers one month’s wages;

 

3. Compensation should be calculated by wages payable (currently, the one month’s wages compensation is calculated by the average wages payable of the past 12 months, between June 2014 and May 2015), instead of the actual wages.

 

4. The missing premiums of workers’ social security insurance since their dates of commencement.

 

5. The missing contribution of workers’ housing provident fund since their dates of commencement.

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Two killed as PIA workers clash with LEAs at Karachi airport

Two killed as PIA workers clash with LEAs at Karachi airport | Asian Labour Update | Scoop.it

Two people were killed and at least three others injured on Tuesday after law enforcement personnel allegedly opened fire at employees of the Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) protesting near the Jinnah International airport in Karachi against privatization of the national flag carrier.

Five people, including the cameraman of a local TV channel and four PIA workers, were earlier reported to have been injured in the clash between protesting PIA workers and law enforcement personnel.

But officials at a private hospital later confirmed that one injured person brought to the hospital died during treatment, while another body was brought for autopsy. One of the deceased was identified as Anayat Raza.

The incident came a day after the prime minister enforced the Essential Services Maintenance Act 1952 for six months in an effort to block the impending strike.

- See more at: http://www.geo.tv/latest/100795-Water-cannon-tear-gas-used-against-protesting-PIA-workers-in-Karachi#sthash.58O5cpEV.7hgjaQB2.dpuf

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Apple, Samsung and Sony face child labour claims

Human rights organisation Amnesty has accused Apple, Samsung and Sony, among others, of failing to do basic checks to ensure minerals used in their products are not mined by children.

In a report into cobalt mining in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, it found children as young as seven working in dangerous conditions. Cobalt is a a vital component of lithium-ion batteries.

The firms said that they had a zero tolerance policy towards child labour.

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Labor NGO slams Planters Dev’t Bank’s New Year layoff, contractualization scheme [Philippines]

Labor NGO slams Planters Dev’t Bank’s New Year layoff, contractualization scheme [Philippines] | Asian Labour Update | Scoop.it

A labor nongovernment organization has condemned the retrenchment of 11 employees of Planters Development Bank, which is now owned by Henry Sy, in an apparent move to weaken the local union and replace regular janitors and messengers with contractual workers.

Ecumenical Institute for Labor Education and Research, Inc. (EILER) said 11 messengers and janitors, who have worked for the bank for an average of 20 years and whose security of tenure were fought for by the union, were dismissed last Dec. 30 amid negotiations for a new Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA).

EILER said most of the 11 retrenched workers are union officers.

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Labor strike ends after PT Amtek gives nod to workers’ demands

Labor strike ends after PT Amtek gives nod to workers’ demands | Asian Labour Update | Scoop.it

Five days after going on strike, hundreds of workers from PT Amtek Engineering in Batam, Riau Islands, finally returned to work on Friday, after the Apple subcontractor agreed to meet the workers’ demand to drop a plan to change the company’s name.

The strike, which paralyzed the company’s operation, concluded after an eight-hour mediation meeting between company executives and workers’ representatives on Thursday. The meeting produced six points of agreement, including an agreement that the company would scrap the plan to change the company’s name to Interplex.

PT Amtek, a Singaporean firm, has been in operation in Batam since 1996, carrying out metal stamping and forming services. It has an investment value of US$60 million.

The company became a subcontractor for California-based multinational technology company Apple after the former bought Interplex, a company based in the US, in July last year.

Soon after the takeover, Amtek’s parent company, Singapore-based Amtek Engineering Ltd., officially changed its name to Interplex Holdings Ltd.

PT Amtek was preparing to do the same but the company received opposition from workers who feared that the company’s name change would put their service period back to zero.

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Free Labour Activists in China Now

Free Labour Activists in China Now | Asian Labour Update | Scoop.it

On Dec 21st, 2015, Hong Kong labour groups held a protest in front of Liaison Office of the Central People's Government, Hong Kong SAR, in support the detained Chinese labour activists.

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Police attacked peaceful protest - the second day of General Strike in Indonesia

Police attacked peaceful protest - the second day of General Strike in Indonesia | Asian Labour Update | Scoop.it

UPDATE:

The second day of #GeneralStrike in Indonesia (25 Nov 2015)

Five union leaders have been arrested in Bekasi Industrial Estates, West Java. These are the five union leaders:

1. Nurdin Muhidin (labour actvists and member of local parliament)

2. Ruhiyat (NAMICOH plant level union)

3. Udin Wahyudin (HIKARI plant level union)

4. Amo Sutarmo (EPINDO plant level union)

5. Adika Yadi (NGK plant level union)

In other area in Bekasi, a Korean company has hired tens of thugs to attack the protesters.

In this picture, labour activis who also local parliament members, Nurdin Muhidin, was arrested by the police.

Asian TNC Monitoring Network strongly condemn the repression and violence.

Long live #InternationalSolidarity

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Support General Strike in Indonesia

Support General Strike in Indonesia | Asian Labour Update | Scoop.it

Dear All


Indonesian workers and unions request our solidarity and support in demanding the government to revoke the wage regulation No.78/2015. This new wage regulation restricts the wage increase and workers participation in its decision making process. Thousands of workers have been on strikes in many cities. There are also calls for general strikes.


In response to the situation, Asian TNCs Monitoring Network extends its support and solidarity to the struggle of workers and unions in Indonesia.


In solidarity and struggle (ATNC Monitoring Network)

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Police criticized for violently dispersing labor protest [Indonesia]

Police criticized for violently dispersing labor protest [Indonesia] | Asian Labour Update | Scoop.it
Labor activists have pointed fingers at the Jakarta Police for allegedly committing violent acts when they tried to disperse a labor protest from in front of the State Palace in Central Jakarta, on Friday.“The police have committed violence against our friends — Tigor Gempita Hutapea and Obed Sakti Luitnan — and 23 workers during Friday’s rally. The police failed to apply human rights standards. They, instead, triggered the clash,” Alghiffari Aqsa, the Jakarta Legal Aid Foundation (LBH Jakarta) director, said in a press release on Saturday.Thousands of workers from Greater Jakarta staged a street rally on Friday, demanding the revocation of the newly issued Government Regulation (PP) No. 78/2015 that stipulates the calculation of the annual minimum wage increase by using the current fiscal year’s inflation and gross domestic product (GDP) growth rates. They also called for a wage increase of 22 to 25 percent next year.The rally ended with a clash between protesters and the police.Alghiffari explained that the clash broke out at 8 p.m. when the police started to beat a number of protesters who refused to end their action. The police also hit Tigor and Obed, who at that time were documenting the rally using their mobile phones.Alghiffari said Tigor and Obed tried to explain that they were from LBH, which was assisting the alliances. However, the police ignored them and dragged them over to the police cars along with 23 protesters.Both activists suffered from wounds and bruises to their heads and stomachs.
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[Cambodia] Compromise Remains Elusive in Minimum Wage Negotiations

[Cambodia] Compromise Remains Elusive in Minimum Wage Negotiations | Asian Labour Update | Scoop.it

After leaving the room early, union leader Ath Thorn said the four walked out because the government was insisting that the wage proposal that received the least votes not be passed on to the LAC for further discussion. They were worried that pro-government unions in the group would tip the results in favor of the lower proposals.

“We walked out because we had requested not to have a vote, but to discuss the numbers and send all of them to the LAC,” he said.

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Understanding Capital Mobility and Global Production Networks (A Meeting Report)

Understanding Capital Mobility and Global Production Networks (A Meeting Report) | Asian Labour Update | Scoop.it

This meeting report discussed the prospect of labour organising in Asia. The objectives of the meeting are (1) to provide a space for an exchange of knowledge and experiences between labour scholars and activists in the Asia on the issues of capital mobility, global production networks, and the current status of transnational corporations and their role in the region; (2) to identify the impact of the capital mobility and the global production networks on the marginalisation of the workers in the region; (3) to define areas for the labour movement in challenging the capital mobility and the global production networks, and to draw the priorities and strategies of labour organising in the region.

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The global power of the Transnational Corporations (An interview with Martin Hart-Landsberg)

An interview with Dr. Martin Hart-Landsberg by Fahmi Panimbang on the global power of the TNCs operating in Asia.

http://amrc.org.hk/content/transnational-corporations


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Pay up Our Fair Compensation

Pay up Our Fair Compensation | Asian Labour Update | Scoop.it
2nd Year of Rana Plaza Tragedy: Status of Rana Plaza Victims: Compensation and Rehabilitation
 
“I do not understand why compensation amount differs from one victim to another and why was I paid less compensation than someone else who was not injured as seriously as I am. I know another worker who was not present on that tragic day but has received money” said Mr. Shafiqul Islam, Member of the Rana Plaza and Tazreen Fashions Accidents Victims Rights Network while he showed his right hand which was permanently disabled during the fire in addition to describing other severe injuries on his body.
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