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NYTimes video: "Skateistan"

"Afghan youth have very limited options for sports and recreation. An Australian man is trying to change that."  Issues of ethnicity, class and gender are right on the surface.  Globalization, cultural values and shifting norms make this a good discussion piece.  


Via Seth Dixon
Ashley Raposo's insight:

Skateistan is an inspiring effort to give children in Afghanistan something to do other than work, give the girls some freedom before they come of age, and have cultures and classes come together to understand equality, even on such a small scale. The culture clash of skateboarding and traditional Afghan raised youth sounds corky at first but turns out to be a great project that challenges race, class, and gender.

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James Hobson's curator insight, October 21, 6:49 PM

(Central Asia topic 2)

This video illustrates how a positive impact is being made in an oftentimes negative and bleak part of the world. Though some may scrutinize it as too small-scale or westernization, I believe this is a great starting point for the causes of promoting opportunity, getting kids 'off the streets', and as an example of how boundaries can be crossed beneficially. It seems wise for embassies to invest in projects such as this in the same way that police in South America are asked to provide community service to the areas they serve: the stigma of 'the other' and irrational fears can be done away with and allow people such as the Afghans to more effectively have their problems solved from the inside out.

In addition, issues of cultural and religious restrictions, such as those on women, may have voices gaining ground that will help adapt them to a more equal-gendered, modern world.

 

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 1:25 PM

This is an inspirational video it is very powerful to see someone trying to make life better. The young Australian man that has created this program should be applauded. Watching this video you can tell that this simple gesture brings so much joy to these children. One feeling that comes to mind is yes countries can seem different but they can also seem familiar. These children are just like any others they want to play and have fun. I think this is a wonderful program for them to help them forget about the dangerous world they live in.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 3, 2:03 PM

This is a good example of the use of soft power in areas where American culture is not popular. Instead of using military force to exert western Ideals on the people of Afghanistan. This Australian may have found a way to close the gap towards bringing our cultures  closer together.

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Chechnya: 200 years of background in four minutes


Via Seth Dixon
Ashley Raposo's insight:

Chechnya isn't the only part of the Eurasian plate wanting to be their own country. But sadly, due to horrible circumstances, the Chechans have come to terrorist actions. Constant warfare is their way to fight against their Russian rule.Although the tensions seem to be a bit calmer, nationalism in this part of the world is still on high. These tensions though could just be the reason for not only deaths in Chchnya but also in other parts of the world. Chechnya's location is beneficial to Russia and they most likely won't let that ethnic territory get away.

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Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 15, 9:11 PM

This is a very well thought out video clip. The fact that John Kerry was not even able to correctly name this region is a prime example of why it is important for everyone to be educated on world geography.

I enjoyed the incorporation of famous author Leo Tolstoy. I was also interested  to hear where the phrase "sending to Siberia" had come from.In a short amount of time this video provides great insight.

Amanda Morgan's comment, October 18, 3:55 PM
The video gives a cohesive background of Chechnya. The background of those in Chechnya and their tactics raise major red flags as such acts of violence are all they have ever known.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 18, 3:55 PM
The video gives a cohesive background of Chechnya. The background of those in Chechnya and Russia, and their tactics raise major red flags as such acts of violence are all they have ever known.   
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50 Pictures Of Chernobyl 25 Years After The Nuclear Disaster

50 Pictures Of Chernobyl 25 Years After The Nuclear Disaster | Ashley's Wonderful Geography page | Scoop.it
50 Pictures Of Chernobyl 25 Years After The Nuclear Disaster: Today marks the 25th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. ...

 

A haunting gallery that displays the effects of environmental and political mismanagement. 


Via Seth Dixon, Al Picozzi
Ashley Raposo's insight:

Absolutely frightening to see a city so empty.  To only imgine what could have been in Chernobyl today if this nuclear disaster didn't happen.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:55 PM

I was 15 when this happened.  The scare of fallout was huge as this was a total meltdown.  I also remember Three Mile Island, PA in 1979 where the scare was not as big as it was only a partial meltdown.  Today though it is the newly independant countires of the Ukraine and Belarus, former Soviet republics, that have to deal with the long term issues.  The pictures here are just errie, like this place just stopped in time and since in can't be inhabited for 10,000 years, it will always look like 1986!

Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 20, 2013 3:03 PM

The pictures are breathtaking.  What was once a modern and prosperous area is now completely devestated and basically irreparable for hundreds of years to come.  In some of the pictures it is possible to see the haste and desertion of buildings and rooms which gives a sense of fear and panic that the people experienced.  There is surely still so much that can be explored, but the radiation limits people and the danger of the area is hard for civilians to be within the boundaries of Chernobyl.  Places like this show how drastic the rise and fall of the Soviet Union really was.  Similar to mono-towns in Siberia, these areas were set up for people to flourish and become successful, but as history went on and disasters ensued, the great empire came crashing down.

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 3:51 AM

These photo's are rather gripping.  Many of the images seen here are of objects that have not moved or been touched in 25 years.  The entire population of Pripyat had to pack their bags and leave all in an instant. The chaos that must have ensued after the nuclear meltdown must have been haunting. Pripyat will remain like this for years to come, and one can imagine what it will look like in 25 more years.

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Rising Anti-Immigration Sentiment in the EU

Stratfor Europe Analyst Adriano Bosoni discusses the political implications of the increasing number of migrants from the European Union's periphery to its c...

Via Seth Dixon
Ashley Raposo's insight:

Like America, Western Europe is facing the troubles of immigration for jobs. COuntries in Europe, such as Eastern countries of Bulgaria and the P.I.G.S. are moving to core countries in search of work that the cannot find in their own land. The problem becomes a matter of the core country citizens not having jobs for themselves as their economy joins other in slowing down. Racial tensions are rising because of this. Ironically, the video generalizes the anti-immigration as just anti-immigrants but as images in the video would suggest, much of the sentiments are towards Muslim immigrants.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 9, 2013 12:26 PM

This looks just like the arguments in the US about the immigration issue here.  These seem to be be more of legal immigration, as well as illegal to some extent,  as to illegal immigration in the US.  The governments of some of the EU nations need this population in order to fill the workers shortage that has been fuled by low birth rates.  In the US its a little deffernt form of immigration.  Here many illegal immigrants are taking the much lower wage jobs and working in cash with no taxes, ie mirgrant farmers.  Well we want cheap food, that is the way the farm owners are doing it.  In Europe it seems that they are taking some jobs, but I assune since it is legal immigration they are paying some sort of tax on their wages.  These immigrants are from other EU countries for the most part.  Under the EU treaty it is legal for them to live and work in any member nation.  This shows the problem with supranational organizations, a country will lose some of its autonomy in these types of organizations.  For example, can the UK limit the number of people allowed into its country, or even limit access to their health care system under EU law?  If they do, what can the EU do to the UK?  Looks like a fight is about to start!

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 11:12 AM

This video describes the increase in immigration into EU countries from other EU countries.  The EU agreements on free movement are being challenged in countries that feel rightly or wrongly that the immigrants coming in are a drain on their economies during this difficult economic time.  It is interesting to see how Europe deals with this immigration issue compared to how America deals with its immigration issues.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 10, 4:47 PM
(Europe post 8) Europe's immigration 'crisis' seems to echo many of the causes and effects currently being felt in the U.S.'s own situation. As jobs become scarcer, anti-immigrant sentiments start to gain ground. The introduction of new cultures can create a sense of cultural insecurity. Controversial laws are put into effect to try to gain some control on the situation. Though it does seem like an invasion to those already living there, keep in mind that the immigrants aren't trying to cause such things; rather, they are looking to regain lost ground for themselves. I know there is a wide divide on political views, but in the very least individuals and governments alike should keep an open mind (even if not an open door) to what outsiders are experiencing / what their driving force is.
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2014 World Cup: Will Brazil Be Ready?

ESPN Video: With the FIFA World Cup two years away, will Brazil be ready to host soccers premiere event?

 

This short sports documentary (12 minutes) looks at some of the socioeconomic and urban planning issues that are a part of the logistics for a country to prepare for a sporting event on the magnitude of the World Cup.  The discussion of demolitions in the favelas (squatter settlements) is especially intriguing.  Major sporting events of this magnitude that last for two weeks can reshape local geographic patterns for decades.  

 

Tags: sport, Brazil, planning, squatter.


Via Seth Dixon
Ashley Raposo's insight:

The World Cup is getting closer and all eyes are on Brazil. The Favelas are seeing the worst of it. To improve their country for it's soon to be influx of tourists, the Favelas are going through practically forced renovations. Not to mention safety hazards in Brazil are being pushed to the limits with the building anf remidelling of the soccer stadiums. Just last month 2 construction workers part of the rebuilding were killed by an accident. The question is especially true. Will Brazil be ready? Soccer fans around the globe sure hope so.

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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 1, 2013 5:11 PM

I know my soccer, and I know Brazil knows its soccer considering the country has one of the richest histories in the world.  The nation eats, sleeps, and breathes the beautiful game and to host a World Cup right now is immaculate timing.  Some of the best players (possibly ever) in the world would be playing next year, all from star-studded nations.  The forecast for this spectacle will surely be one of the best in history, but that's if it all goes to plan.  There's been many videos and articles of Brazil coming into more problems than solutions.  Repairing and even building new stadiums have set back schedules and have even angered many locals.  In some cities, there have been cases of gentrification, places such as favelas have fell victim.  Being such a passionate fan of the sport, it's almost upsetting that all of these people are being misplaced to house the tournament which has been anxiously waited on since 2010.  The main picture says it all with the three hands covered in blood...  A nation which cares so much about a sport, where it is a way of life and prosperity, is in fact doing more harm than good in some areas.  In the end I hope Brazil can get back on schedule, and leave as little people harmed in the process so the world can enjoy one of the greatest sporting events come summer of 2014.

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Romario launches another FIFA attack

Romario launches another FIFA attack | Ashley's Wonderful Geography page | Scoop.it
Brazilian legend Romario launches another attack against FIFA and officials Sepp Blatter and Jerome Valcke Romario launches another attack against FIFA, Brazilian officials
Ashley Raposo's insight:

Romario expresses the thoughts of many Brazilians and thier aggitation with the upcoming FIFA world cup and the corruption of the game. This also shows some political tensions within Brazil and with the FIFA organization. The World Cup is a huge event that is taking it's toll on Brasil's people and economics. Romario, a former Brazilian nation team player, who once played in the world cup, has seen the glory of the game and the event, but now also sees the corruption and distress the beautiful game brings to the nation hosting it.

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Why more Mexicans are staying home

Tiny Tamaula is the new face of rural Mexico: Villagers are home again as the illegal immigration boom drops to net zero. Full story on CSMonitor.com: http:/...

 

Contrary to popular opinion, illegal immigration from Mexico to the United States is not really a problem in 2012.  As conditions on both sides of the border have changed, this gives a glimpse into the life choices of Mexican villagers.  For more on this issue see the complete article at: http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Americas/2012/0408/Home-again-in-Mexico-Illegal-immigration-hits-net-zero ;


Via Seth Dixon
Ashley Raposo's insight:

This short video shows the new era of less and less Mexicans illegally going to the USA. The Mexicans now staying at home find opportunities aren't found in the US anymore. The people seem happier to be with their families and raising their children in the Mexican identity.

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Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 11:55 AM

I enjoy stories like this, because it demonstrates people willing to fight for their home. Many interesting ideas lie behind stories such as this one, but what I find especially intriguing is the dynamics of money in relation to these small rural villages. Money and "income" drives our current economic positions, but there are some places which were left behind and have none of the jobs we in the first world would traditionally think of. They had to either subside off their own products through farming, or trade their livelyhood for a small amount of money. Put simply, money is necessary for a so called "modern" existence, but not necessary for survival. These villagers are working for their own future in their home country now though, while it may not be necessarily profitable in the short term, it will pay off for their children in the long term.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 11:29 AM

(Mexico topic 1)
"Things are not good in the United States. There is not a lot of work and Mexicans like to keep busy." I was surprised by this this comment which sums up one of the main reasons why many Mexican immigrants are returning to Mexico. This implies that as the American economy has worsened, Mexico's must be improving (at least by comparison). This completely supports the concept of Mexico evolving into a "semi-core" country.
   Additionally, I hope this quote will help to shed some truth onto the negative lazy stereotype many Americans associate with immigrating Mexicans.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 16, 9:44 PM

Harsher border control and less opportunity have created a dramatic decrease in the amount of people coming to the United States.I think a large misconception among many Americans is that people from other countries come here to take advantage of our governmental support, in many cases this is just not true.People from other countries often come to the US to have a better life in the way of more opportunities . With the current state of our economic health it has become less and less beneficial to do that.

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This Map Showing What Each Country Leads The World In Is Really Quite Cool

This Map Showing What Each Country Leads The World In Is Really Quite Cool | Ashley's Wonderful Geography page | Scoop.it
We're suddenly not feeling quite so proud to be British.
Ashley Raposo's insight:

pretty cool map showing what each country leads. Sadly shows some of the effects of the Sahel (Pirates, inflation, illiteracy,) But also shows some entertaining things. My personal is the slight low blow for Germany's National Soccer game). Some interesting things for each country, and a couple surprising. Gives me a different feel for the world.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, December 8, 2013 2:23 PM

Before I looked at this map I was pretty excited to see what kind of things each country was good at. However looking at the different things each country was good at almost made me laugh a little bit. I couldn't really figure out if this was supposed to be a joke or not. For the U.S. it said the country was good at getting killed by lawnmowers. However places like Brazil is talked about FIFA cups, which I thought was accurate since they tend to have a successful soccer background. I think each thing is supposed to give a little bit of info about a country's particular culture, which is pretty cool. However I just don't know how serious and accurate this data is. What I did like and find intersting is that looking at this map you could break things up to see what countries are good at or even what they are bad at. The visual representation was something I thought was noteworthy in this article, and something that could show a lot of data if it were portraying accurate information. 

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Computer Programming Used To Be Women’s Work

Computer Programming Used To Be Women’s Work | Ashley's Wonderful Geography page | Scoop.it
Today, computer programmers are expected to be male, nerdy and antisocial - an odd, and self fulfilling prophesy that forgets the women that the entire field was built upon

Via Seth Dixon
Ashley Raposo's insight:

Computor programming was thought to be a woman's job, just like making your home work you can make a computer work. But when Men of the time saw this area of careers controlled by women they made it so tests for this career were targeted for men to pass. Now it is a science far from being it's once woman oriented path. Gender inequality is very simple to see in the eyes of a computer programmer.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 8, 2013 11:59 AM

This article highlights how notions of gender and gender roles are culturally mediated and change over time. 

Sarah Ziolkowski's curator insight, January 1, 6:33 PM

This article applies to the  gender cultural differences sub unit. This article focuses on the change in gender roles in the computer software industry. An industry that males dominate today, was actually once considered a job for women. This wasn't becauseof gender equality, but that the cultural values for gender placed computer software as a job for women.  The few men in the computer industry put a lot of effort into taking women out of that work, and succeeded, completely changing the workforce in the computer software industry. This is a great example of cultural differences in our society and how much it can affect us. 

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The Government Shutdown Is Exactly Like "Mean Girls"

You can't sit with us, Ted Cruz.
Ashley Raposo's insight:

This is the most important comparison I have ever seen to the American Government. Just thought I would share this tidbit of comedy.

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Ontario says it won't restrict religious rights like Quebec 'values charter'

TORONTO - Canada's most populous province spoke out Thursday against Quebec's controversial "values charter," saying it would never contemplate similar legislation restricting religious freedom.

Via Barry W. Bussey
Ashley Raposo's insight:

These differences in Canada about the freedom to demonstrate and celebrate your religion is one America has met and still meets today. The two countries face similar problems in this category, the problem of separation of church and state and the freedom of religious expression. Ontario looks to be on the track of a future with religious acceptance, while Quebec may just vote to restrict even wearing a sign of faith.

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From the Mouths of Rapists: The Lyrics of Robin Thicke’s Blurred Lines » Sociological Images

From the Mouths of Rapists: The Lyrics of Robin Thicke’s Blurred Lines » Sociological Images | Ashley's Wonderful Geography page | Scoop.it
Ashley Raposo's insight:

Robin Thicke's rape culture anthem has been spurring constant reaction. Not just from those of us just plain old disgusted by the misogynist display of a married man with children and his friends having naked women parade around them, but this song is a trigger for many women (and men) who have to hear the words their rapists said to them.

This article shows photos of victims and the words they are reminded of constantly.

Nothing like a top rated song to make us females feel like we're not human beings.

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Captain America in a turban

Captain America in a turban | Ashley's Wonderful Geography page | Scoop.it
I wore that costume to challenge the way New Yorkers think about superheroes -- and bearded Sikhs like me
Ashley Raposo's insight:

Amazing short peice on a cool experiment through New York. Definitely a good view of race issues still playing in America today. This man was awesome and the people who cheered him on even better.

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Troubles on Russia's Lake Baikal

Workers at an ailing paper mill in Siberia are clinging to their jobs in the face of financial pressure and criticism from environmentalists.

 

The environment, industry and politics play key roles in this story of an old style Soviet mono-town on Lake Baikal.  Monotowns had planned economies that revolved around one industry and today many of these are struggling in the post-Soviet era.  While the particulars of the political situation are a bit dated, the overall issue is still quite relevant to understanding Russia today.   

 

Tags: Russia, industry, labor, environment, economic, water, pollution, environment modify, unit 6 industry.


Via Seth Dixon
Ashley Raposo's insight:

THough the Soviet Union has been gone since the early 90s, it's hold on Russia is still creating problems. The creations of monotowns were already flawed. But to have this one monotown on Lake Baikal has gained the attention of enviromentalists. All odds are against that monotown. Without it's paper factory they have no jobs and no need for the town. It is a fight between enviromental geography and human geography in this area of the world. These people are stuck in a time where even the Soviet Union looked a little better than the constant wondering of your finacial stability in an up and coming capitalist nation.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 16, 2013 8:14 PM

We never heard about this during the Soviet Union as the news was controlled.  Also during the Soviet time I do not believe environmentalists would have gotton the chance to investigate the area.  With the fall of the USSR the world can now see some of the environmental effects that communism had on Russia.  These towns are built around the factory.  Much like the old steele towns in PA, like Allentown.  However Allentown chnaged with the times and is able to support, although it is difficult, the population that was focused on the steele industry.  Here is this remote area of Russia, there is nothing else in the area.  There is no service economy in the area, just the paper factory.  It has been kept open because of Putin who basically said to ignore all environmental laws and regulations and he made sure the environmental groups are not an issue anymore.  Not surprising from a former KGB Lt. Colonel and the Director of the FSB, the sucessor of the KGB.  To solve the issue in these monotowns I think there needs to be government intervention to transition the economies in theses areas.  To keep these factories running in the long run will just hurt all the people in the towns with no end in sight.  However, I do not think this will happen unless there is a change in the leadership of Russia, something I do not think will happen anytime soon.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 20, 2013 2:43 PM

The story of this particular mono-town is very tough to "pick sides".  The factory undoubtedly pollutes the air and land like most other industrial areas, but being so close to Lake Baikal gives environmentalists a stronger reason to complain.  The lake is considered one of the purest and most unique in the world, yet the paper mill located on its banks raise controversy.  This is where the locals and workers are stuck between a rock and hard place.  Located in Siberia, such a vast and open region with little settlements compared to the western part of the country reminds the people living there that their resources are limited.  Closing down the factory would almost eliminate income and economy for the mono-town.  This is where the fine line is drawn; the workers surely aren't happy about the pollution and environmental hazards that go along with keeping the mill open, but at the same time the people could wither away if it wasn't up and running.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 12:05 PM

The Soviet Union scattered "monotowns" around their territory; these monotowns consist of a job-creating industrial institutions like factories which then allow the formation of towns around them.  They are located all around the former Soviet Union and are very isolated.  After the collapse of the Soviet Union, these towns continued to run due to the privatization of the industrial center.  Today, Russia's Lake Baikal, which is the deepest lake in the world and contains 20 percent of the Earth's fresh water, is home to one of these monotowns.  This particular town's economy is based on their paper mill which uses and deposits tons of chemicals.  Environmentalists are very concerned for the future of the lake while the citizens are only concerned with feeding their families and this is creating social unrest.  Due to the isolation and distance from Moscow, people cannot just pick up and leave.  Also, working with "cleaner" alternatives is way out of this town's budget.  Today, many citizens in these monotowns miss the support that the Soviet Union offered and people are literally stuck in a place where their only income is dirty.

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A 250-mile show of support for Catalonia independence

A 250-mile show of support for Catalonia independence | Ashley's Wonderful Geography page | Scoop.it
More than 1 million flag-draped and face-painted Catalans held hands and formed a 250-mile human chain across the northeastern Spanish region Wednesday in a demonstration of their desires for independence.

Via Seth Dixon
Ashley Raposo's insight:

Catalonia struggles for it's independence from Spain. The wealthy region of Spain angers for becoming it's own country, with sentiments of not getting what they deserve from Spain, such as government services. Spain urges Catalonia to not make such a fuss and head Spain into another civil war. But Catalonia wants to be autonomous at least. Their independence parade is to show Spain they won't back down.

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James Hobson's curator insight, October 9, 10:41 PM

(Europe topic 5)

Catalonia's current situation bears similarities to that of Scotland. In both cases, the national governments don't want to lose the wealth of these regions, and citizens possess a strong sense of regional pride (even if some don't necessarily desire complete independence). This seems like the exact same chain of events in the 1700s that started America's Revolutionary War. The advantage that the Americans had in distance from their mother country is made in modern times by the advantage of social networking, which can draw in support and sympathizers.

Though achieving independence would be symbolic of a strong cultural identity, that shouldn't be the only motivating force for such a desire to separate. It's not as if Catalonians can say they're no longer a part of Europe, for example. Though the issue of economic advantages is brought up, I think that more thought and less 'blind support' should be applied to ensure the best outcome, whichever it ultimately may be.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 16, 9:30 PM

These people are serious about getting the autonomy that they want.  With over a million people forming a human chain 250 miles long these people mean business.  It would be extremely difficult to get one million people in one area of the United States to do anything.  These people have bonded over culture, economics an politics to work together.  Even if they don't get their own country as many of them hope, they are looking for more autonomy and fairer taxes when it comes to Spanish policy.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 8:49 PM

We see more and more ethnic groups seeking independence from their countries, or a "Kingdom" in Scotland's case.  This is a result from when the countries were first formed.  The history of the Catalans go back further than that of Spain.  They have worked diligently to keep their culture visibly different than that of Spain and now want to differentiate further and become completely independent of Spain

 

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Song: European Union

Song: European Union | Ashley's Wonderful Geography page | Scoop.it

"Germany and France spent decades at each others' throats. Now, bound by a common currency, they're working together to save the euro zone. It's a story that's begging for a musical number — which, as it happens, we have right here."


Via Seth Dixon
Ashley Raposo's insight:

A catchy little tune that shows the simple comincal version of how the European Union came to be and turned out. Amazing how a cute little tune shows the troubles of a huge organization such as the European Union.

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 29, 5:05 PM

Some countries such as Germany and France were once enemies. Now they are trying to forget their negative past, as many European countries are struggling financially and this funny song encourages the people to unite, due to the fact they share a common currency. 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 23, 9:02 PM

Although the song is not meant to be serious, the messages it conveys are completely true.  In teaching a course about the European Union this song could be a useful tool and introduction to the lesson on how far Europe has come, what individual countries have gone through, how unity affects each of those countries, the new relationships that need to be formed and the old tensions that need to be forgotten.

Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, November 10, 5:59 PM

This song is very much funny to hear and it describes the E.U financial problems that they are facing. Althought most seem to be dramatic over what is really going on with the European Union. But a funny way to get the broad realization of what is going on!

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Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s | Ashley's Wonderful Geography page | Scoop.it
What America can learn from one of the most sustainable food nations on Earth.

Via Seth Dixon
Ashley Raposo's insight:

Boliva is a country that would rather keep their traditions and culture instead of sitting in a fastfood joint eating food made in under 2 minutes. It's a part of their trade process. It's not just about the pay out in trade, it's about the actual trading off crops. It's a good influence on countries who love fastfood chains of deep fried everything. A healthier lifestyle of simple grown crops bought straight from the vendor.

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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 14, 12:04 PM

No McDonalds? Some people are wondering how these people survive.  Bolivians have a very tight culture with the people around them.  They help each other out especially when it comes to farming and food.  They don't want any outside corporation trying to inflict their ways and cultures on their own culture that they take very much pride in.  America could learn a lot from Bolivia.  We could learn not to rely so much on fast food but rather to rely on the people around us to grow food and help them do so.  Even a community garden could be a start to this.  Take a plot of land in the neighborhood where people can grow fruits and vegetables with the people in their community around them.  Not only would they be growing their own food, but helping one another and meeting others that live around them.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 27, 11:31 PM

Interesting to see that the Bolivian people did not want to have the large fast food chains in their country because they liked to stick with their traditional foods. The article says that the people of Bolivia still eat hamburgers, but they would prefer to buy them from people of their own country. This goes to show the hesitance of some countries to embrace other countries' ways, even if it is as unhealthy as McDonald's. Bolivia is at a geographic advantage because they have many organic vegetables and healthy foods, but large corporations like fast food chains are seeking to expand into them and other countries.

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, October 31, 3:39 PM

This is amazing! It makes me happy that not everyone likes to jump on the corporate coat tails of a giant corporation like McDonalds. There has no nutritional value and cause nothing but health problems. Sticking to what they know and love, makes me happy to see. I wish America wasn't so fast food obsessed! Maybe then the American children wouldn't be so unheathly

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Favela Images

Favela Images | Ashley's Wonderful Geography page | Scoop.it

I love these favela images by Fernando Alan.


Via Seth Dixon
Ashley Raposo's insight:

beautiful from an putside perspective, but it's terrifying to me how close and cramped those houses are, how far up steep mountains they are. It reflects to horrible poverty going on in Brasil today.

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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2:50 PM

The favelas show that the country has not been able to keep up with the growth of urban population,  increasing population, and poverty.  It also shows how the people of Brazil use their resources to survive and build housing. There are many socioeconomic issues at stake in these favelas and with these favelas comes an increase in drugs and violence.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 30, 8:57 AM

(South America topic 6)

These images seem almost unreal in the sense that these favelas appear to be like trees growing out of the hillside. I noticed that the homes towards the bottom of the hill appear much smaller than those at the top. If all were the same size the ones on the top would appear to be smallest from this angle. Even though this is considered a favela, it must be that some are willing to sacrifice space for convenience of location. Lastly, I would imagine that it must be easy to get lost on the way to one's home... the twisting paths and lack of any 'official' streets would be a maze to an outside visitor. I wonder if anybody has had the idea to start making a so-called road map of the paths through these favelas? That would be very interesting to see.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 24, 9:29 PM

These images of the Favelas in Brazil are absolutely amazing. Not only does it show the poor urban parts of the city are, but just how hard it is to live in these areas, as well as, the clustered so many houses are. The largest picture shown seems like a painting and not a picture, which makes the pictures more fascinating to look at.

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Haiti: Legacy of Disaster

"Even before the earthquake Haiti's environment teetered on the brink of disaster. Brent and Craig Renaud report on the country's deforestation problems."

 

What about a disaster is 'natural' and what about the disaster is attributable to how people live on the land?  This video highlights the poverty, architectural and environmental factors that exacerbated the problems in the Haitian Earthquake of 2010.  This is a merging of both the physical geography and human geography.  


Via Seth Dixon
Ashley Raposo's insight:

Haiti had had it's fill of problems before the earthquake,in 2010: poverty, deforestations, flooding and mudslides, a negectful government, and illnesses. It's easy to see that until a solution for the basic economy can be found for Haiti her people's dependancy on one product will be their enviromental and living downfall.

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, February 4, 5:56 PM

This is an example of how civilizations can be hovering on the brink of destruction. The earthquake was the final straw it caused collapse of the whole system. The environment became a wasteland because humans that so not have their basic needs met cannot think about long term consequences of their actions. Need is immediate. If we want to help the country it needs to be in very small doses over many years. Their situation wasn't created overnight and the solution won't happen overnight either.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 28, 1:49 PM

Natural disasters occur because of two things; the environmental reason and how people react to it. This earthquake was only half the reason Haiti is in a natural disaster state. The people who don't know how to respond to such "natural disasters" are the real reason of problematic changes.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 25, 10:26 AM

(Central America topic 2)

Which came first, the chicken or the egg? Or in this case:

Which came first, the deforestation or the disparity?

I believe the answer can be both.

At first such a country's inhabitants might not know what devastating impacts manmade environmental changes such as deforestation can have - or, they might just have no other choice. Here disparity comes first. But unfortunately such effects can be far reaching. Deforestation can 'come back around' and be the cause (not only the result) of disparity: erosion, flooding, landslides, lack of natural resources. These all contribute to further disasters and crises, which continue the repeating trend.

Dr. Bonin has held classes pertaining to this same issue of deforestation, among the other issues which Haitians face. IN addition, the company I work for has been sponsoring a campaign to help humanitarian efforts in the country, and I have worked with people who have lived there.

Lastly, I can't help but notice an uncanny similarity between the deforestation of Haiti and that of Easter Island. I hope Easter Is. will be used as a warning message.

 

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For Mexicans Looking North, a New Calculus Favors Home

For Mexicans Looking North, a New Calculus Favors Home | Ashley's Wonderful Geography page | Scoop.it

"Economic, demographic and social changes in Mexico are suppressing illegal immigration as much as the poor economy or legal crackdowns in the United States."


Via Seth Dixon
Ashley Raposo's insight:

When thinking about immigration and the United States, the constant talk about all the illegal Mexican immigration is prominent. But lately, the facts are changing. Interesting to see the variety of reasons for this population change (smaller families, more education opportunities, jobs).

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Amy Marques's curator insight, February 12, 1:14 PM

This article discusses how there is a significant decline of undocumented migration from Mexico into the United States.  Illegal immigration is becoming less attractive to Mexicans and they are deciding to stay in their country instead of coming to U.S. because Mexico is making some changes. It is expanding economic and educational opportunities in the cities. There is rising border crime, a major deterrent from emigrating, it is dangerous and expensive because of cartel controlled borders. Another change is the shrinking families. The manufacturing sector at the border is rising, democracy is better established, incomes have risen and poverty has declined. Also a tequila boom has taken place and has created new jobs for farmers cutting agave and for engineers at the stills.

 

James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 12:11 PM

(Mexico topic 4)

Unlike other articles and videos, this one seems to possess a different "tone" towards the recent drop in immigration. It seems to imply that the drop in immigration will be mutually beneficial to both the US and Mexico. Mexico would benefit from having more workers to help grow its emerging economy, and the US would have fewer Welfare dependents. I'm not saying that I necessarily agree or disagree with this viewpoint, but I do find it to be a very unique take on the situation. I wonder if the reduction in immigration into the US has allowed more funds to be diverted away from collection and deportation to an increased emphasis on security and patrol efforts? In other words, I think that it is a possibility that the United States was, figuratively speaking, too busy "scooping water from the boat" to get around to "plugging the leak".

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 16, 9:31 PM

These statistics are drastically "left out" of the immigration conversation. There is little to no talk about the emigration in Mexico. Many people are wanting to stay where they are because conditions have improved.I believe if more people knew of this information than maybe we could look past this as such a hot button topic.

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Google Maps taps into hope, reunion and the power of emotional marketing

Ashley Raposo's insight:

A tear-jerking wonderful ad that amkes you want to use google maps and google earth just to see where your life will lead. Brilliant use of advertising and geography

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A importância da imigração nos Açores

Há uns tempos tive oportunidade de visitar o museu de imigração “Ellis Island Immigration Museun” em Nova Iorque, nos Estados Unidos. O museu representa, de forma particularmente ...
Ashley Raposo's insight:

The Azores has always had their people leaving and immirating to other nations, such as America and Canada,  because of multiple reasons -overpopultation, a slow economy, natrual disasters. But from the 2010 census there shows a growing popultation of immigrants TO the Azores. What effects do these other nationalities and cultures have on the Azorean culture? Also what economic future will the Azores have with these peoples coming in?

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Geography of Soccer in the US

Geography of Soccer in the US | Ashley's Wonderful Geography page | Scoop.it

" 549 players from 62 different countries play in MLS in the United States"


Via Seth Dixon
Ashley Raposo's insight:

It's interesting to see that the MLS isn't just USA players, but also incorporates players from all over the worlds, such as other club leagues around the world. Truly this is a show of the true meaning of the sport that FIFA leads, the proof of many cultures working together for a common goal. Hopefully Soccer will become as big in USA as it is in other countries around the world. Perhaps soon another World Cup housed in the US?

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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 11:40 PM

Perfect example of cultural diffusion.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:59 AM

I am a huge soccer fan and with that i also have to say i tend to neglect the MLS due to its lack of talent. The problem in the past with the MLS was that it was too home grown and their wasnt many international players to provide a wider demographic in the leauge which also means worse players. But with the MLS signing some big names from around the world such as Henry from France Beckham from Uk and Cahill from the AU the MLS is growing in popularity around the world and is soon to be a globally viewed leauge. This is a map of where the nearly 600 MLS players come from and it goes to show the more nations you can represent the bigger crowd demographic you can draw in.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 5:25 PM

There are 35 MLS players that came from Africa according to the article. In America soccer or football in Europe is not that popular it is more like our baseball or football then like the soccer over there. (That is their "past time") In America we have a large population that play sports but specifically soccer we do not have that many participants that involve themselves in this , I think part of the reason is that abroad soccer is so important to them and they try to flourish from that sport onto tournments and other MLS players go for the cup. Oppose to America and our excitment about the NFL and MBL.

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A Most Delightful Map : NPR

A Most Delightful Map : NPR | Ashley's Wonderful Geography page | Scoop.it
What I'm going to say sounds ridiculous, but once upon a time it wasn't ridiculous at all. You could wake up one morning in North America and decide to walk to Morocco, have breakfast, and a few hours later, there you are — in Africa.

Via Erica Tommarello
Ashley Raposo's insight:

This article shows today's political bondaries set up like the ancient Pangea. It's an interesting look at how the climate and landscape would be very different in comparrison to today and the entertaining new possiblities of travelling to far away places -not being far away in those times-. Wouldn't mind hopping in my car and driving about an hour and be in Morocco.

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Erica Tommarello's curator insight, September 20, 2013 12:14 PM

This map pictures Pangea with present political boundaries and states. It's fascinating!

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Cheerios "Just Checking" Backlash Spoof

ORIGINAL CHEERIOS "JUST CHECKING" SPOT HERE http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kYofm5d5Xdw The creative team at Cheerios responds to the backlash created by the ...

Via Community Village Sites
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Satirical backfire against the rasist comments towards Cheerios? Pretty entertaining.

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