Ashlee Miller
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Rescooped by Ashlee Miller from Geography Education
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Can You Name These Cities by Their Starbucks Locations?

Can You Name These Cities by Their Starbucks Locations? | Ashlee Miller | Scoop.it

"Can you recognize it by its Starbucks locations?  Let’s find out. This quiz shows all of the Starbucks locations within the city boundaries of 20 domestic or foreign cities, and for each you must name the city depicted from four choices."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 24, 2013 1:19 PM

This is my favorite place-based guessing game since GeoGuessr (5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" and you have to guess where).  This isn't about knowing Starbucks locations, but understanding spatial urban economic patterns (just as this article showing the locations where McDonald's and Burger King will place stores also relies of understanding urban economic patterns).  In this Starbucks game you have to recognized the shape of the city, major street patterns and the economic patterns just to name a few.  This is one way to make the urban model more relevant.       


Tags: urbanmodels, economic, trivia.

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 24, 2013 6:53 PM

Unfortuntaley I wasn't very good at this game. I believe I ended up getting 5 answers correct. However what was intersting about this article was to see how each starbucks was placed in certain areas. There were so much more starbucks locations in city areas. The starbucks' also typically were off of main highways or corners. This is for similiar reasons to what we dicussed about dunkin donuts in class. People are only going to travel so far for coffee. If it is not convienent then people will go else where. It is not like car dealership where people will drive out of their way to look. For a coffee people on average may drive 5 minutes. Anything too out of the way people will avoid. That is why there are so many starbucks and dunkins so close to eachother. They are set up equdistant from each other in locations that are convient for people around the area to try and get them to choose their coffee. It is typical to put a coffee shop on the main roads like we see in the maps, as well as in numerous locations to convience the whole area. The more convient the shop the more money they will make. That is why there are some many locations so close to each other. It is interesting to see it visually on a map just how many locations there actually are. 

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Sustainable Treehouse Architecture for a Contemporary Coastal Home

Sustainable Treehouse Architecture for a Contemporary Coastal Home | Ashlee Miller | Scoop.it

This house is integrated with nature, sustainably designed and features a pared back palette infused with just the right amount of contrast.


Originally designed by Bark Design, the architects adopted principles of authenticity, economy, durability and simplicity into the design. A change in ownership gave the opportunity to further explore and refine the dwelling for its new occupants.

In the words of the architects, "The basic ‘pavilion’ plan was sketched out in the sand during an early site visit. A simple diagram of two timber pavilions placed either side of a 50 year old Morton Bay Ash ensures that the tree takes centre stage to the scale, proportions and life of the house around it. Celebrating its natural, coastal setting, the house provides its occupants with an inextricable link to the landscape. Exploring ideas of lightness, layers of transparency and integrating indoor/outdoor living within dynamic patterns of light and shadow, the Marcus Beach house is a simple frame to enable a contemporary coastal lifestyle to unfold within a very special landscape.


Via Lauren Moss
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Becky Schivley Mather's comment, July 16, 2013 9:22 PM
The Swiss Family Robinson would have loved this!
Rescooped by Ashlee Miller from sustainable architecture
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Minimalism + Light: Curved Courtyard House in Naruto, Japan

Minimalism + Light: Curved Courtyard House in Naruto, Japan | Ashlee Miller | Scoop.it

A minimalist house with a curved exterior that provides privacy, security, natural light and air circulation, and plenty of space for children to play.

 

Osaka-based architect Naoko Horibe was given a tall order when she set out to design this residence in Naruto-Shi, Tokushima, Japan. First, the property is located in an area that tends to flood during heavy rains. Second, the clients wanted their new home to provide security and privacy, while at the same time having enough space for their children. And last, but not least, they asked for the house to have good natural light and air circulation throughout.

To work around the potential flooding situation, the foundation and floor were built fairly high. The house itself is designed such that the rooms are built around a central courtyard. The rooms loop together and create a path for the kids to run around. 

The courtyard helps bring light into the interior, helping to achieve one of the clients’ requests. It also helps with air circulation.


View more photos at the article link.


Via Lauren Moss
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