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Nanothermometer takes the temperature of living cells and can map millikelvin fluctuations

Nanothermometer takes the temperature of living cells and can map millikelvin fluctuations | ASEM Aquaculture Health | Scoop.it

A tool originally developed for quantum computers can now map temperature changes within a living cell. The technique exploits quantum effects in tiny diamond crystals, or 'nanodiamonds', to detect changes down to a few thousandths of a degree. The researchers were also able to heat selected parts of the cell using a laser. “We now have a tool to control temperature on a cellular level, and we can study how biological systems react to temperature change,” says Peter Maurer, a physicist at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and a member of the team publishing the result recently in Nature.

 

The researchers used a nanowire to inject diamond crystals into a human embryonic cell. They then shone green laser light on the cell, causing the nitrogen impurities to fluoresce with red light.

 

Variations in local temperatures inside the cell affect the intensity of red light emitted by the nitrogen–vacancy centres. The researchers were able to measure that intensity and use it to calculate the temperature of the corresponding nanodiamond. As diamond conducts heat well, the nanocrystal is likely to be the same temperature as its immediate cellular environment.

 

The researchers also injected the cell with gold nanoparticles, then trained a laser on them to heat up different parts of the cell. Thanks to their tiny diamond thermometers, they were able to precisely control where the temperature was rising and by how much.

 

A diamond-based thermometer could be a useful tool in basic biology, Maurer says, noting that a number of biological processes, ranging from gene expression to cellular metabolism, are strongly affected by temperature. For example, biologists could study the development of simple organisms, such as the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, by controlling temperature locally. “You could heat individual cells and study whether surrounding cells slow down or speed up” their rate of reproduction, Maurer says.

 

Other teams have used fluorescent molecules to map temperature in human cells, but the Harvard thermometer is at least 10 times more sensitive than those techniques, Maurer says, detecting fluctuations of as little as 0.05 Kelvin. The authors say that there is room for improvement, however, because outside of living cells their tiny device has already achieved sensitivities of 0.0018 Kelvin.

 

The nanodiamond thermometers also have potential uses in chemistry to monitor how heat flows affect chemical reactions, especially at the interface between two substances, says David Awschalom, a physicist at the University of California in Santa Barbara, who led one of the earlier studies demonstrating diamond-based thermometry.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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This looks as if it could open up some interesting new areas for research

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ASEM Aquaculture Health
Collated articles relevant to the work of the ASEM Aquaculture Platform on Aquatic Animal Health - http://sites.google.com/site/aqasemhealth
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The Aquaculturists: 19/07/2016: Benchmark’s new seabass vaccine commences commercial field trials

The Aquaculturists: 19/07/2016: Benchmark’s new seabass vaccine commences commercial field trials | ASEM Aquaculture Health | Scoop.it

Benchmark’s new seabass vaccine for nodavirus commences commercial field trials.


Via Perendale Publishers (Tuti Tan)
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European Association of Fish Pathologists | 2nd Meeting – Stirling September 2016

European Association of Fish Pathologists | 2nd Meeting – Stirling September 2016 | ASEM Aquaculture Health | Scoop.it

Conference topics include: 

Major disease challenges to the salmonid industry 
Major disease challenges to ornamental, cyprinid, shellfish, marine and wild fish industries 
Cleaner fish health
Future technologies and challenges 
Funding opportunities

Use e-mail link on page for further detials. Online registrations via http://shop.stir.ac.uk/browse/product.asp?compid=1&modid=1&catid=27 ;
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Book now for EAFP UK and Ireland meeting in September
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MSc in Aquatic Production and Veterinary Health: City University of Hong Kong

MSc in Aquatic Production and Veterinary Health: City University of Hong Kong | ASEM Aquaculture Health | Scoop.it
City University of Hong Kong’s School of Veterinary Medicine, in collaboration with the University of Stirling (Scotland), will be introducing an MSc in AQUATIC PRODUCTION AND VETERINARY HEALTH in September 2016. The demand for aquatic food worldwide is increasing significantly and at the same time there is pressure for more efficient production and safe food while taking into account the environmental and sustainability issues throughout the entire aquatic food value chain. This programme responds to the large global prevalence of aquatic products and the rising demand in the aquatic industry in Mainland China and Hong Kong. Most aquatic-related master’s programmes in the region approach aquatic production from marine biology, ecology, or environmental perspectives. This MSc programme is differentiated by its focus on aquatic production with a veterinary element, and will attract industry professionals who are seeking to deepen their knowledge in order to advance their careers moving on from production roles into specialist roles.
John Bostock's insight:
With the ongoing development of the aquaculture industry and continual challenge of good health management, this new option in Asia for aquatic heath management training should be of interest to companies and individuals alike.
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Using the H-index to assess disease priorities for salmon aquaculture

Using the H-index to assess disease priorities for salmon aquaculture | ASEM Aquaculture Health | Scoop.it
Preventive Veterinary Medicine Volume 126, 1 April 2016, Pages 199–207

Alexander G. Murraya, Maya Wardehb & K. Marie McIntyreb

Highlights 
• Ranking pathogens of salmon aquaculture is difficult. 
• We use publication trends and H-index to rank pathogens. 
• Sea lice, infectious salmon anaemia, furunculosis have highest H-indices. 
• Bacterial publications in decline, reflects vaccination. 
• Virus and sea lice publications increasing reflecting emerging problems.
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Turbot: The First Vertebrate to be Sequenced in Spain

Turbot: The First Vertebrate to be Sequenced in Spain | ASEM Aquaculture Health | Scoop.it
SPAIN - Scientists from CSIC and the University of Santiago de Compostela have led the field in identifying the genes of turbot which give clues into disease resistance.
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NMBU-researchers have developed new model for vaccine trials in tilapia

NMBU-researchers have developed new model for vaccine trials in tilapia | ASEM Aquaculture Health | Scoop.it
Global intensification of tilapia production has raised questions on its susceptibility to a number of bacterial diseases.  Francisellosis is one of the most devastating tilapia infections and has a troubling impact on the tilapia production.

Researchers at NMBU’s Department of Food Safety and Infection Biology (Matinf) have recently developed a new cohabitation model for vaccine trials in tilapia, and conducted a unique experiment which have never been conducted in Norway before.
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How Norway Avoids Antibiotics in Aquaculture

How Norway Avoids Antibiotics in Aquaculture | ASEM Aquaculture Health | Scoop.it
NORWAY - Over the past few years Norway has cut its antibiotic use in salmon farming to virtually zero. This has led to a flourishing industry and a reduction in the risk of antibiotic resistance in humans.
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The success of vaccines and other health management strategies in reducing the need for antibiotics in salmon farming is well documented, but the headline numbers here are still striking - Norway's salmon farms hold more than double the biomass of the human population whilst antibiotic use is less than 2% of that used for human health in the country.

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Draft Genome Sequence of Non-Vibrio parahaemolyticus Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease Strain KC13.17.5, Isolated from Diseased Shrimp in Vietnam

Draft Genome Sequence of Non-Vibrio parahaemolyticus Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease Strain KC13.17.5, Isolated from Diseased Shrimp in Vietnam | ASEM Aquaculture Health | Scoop.it

A strain of Vibrio (KC13.17.5) causing acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in shrimp in northern Vietnam was isolated. Normally, AHPND is caused by Vibrio parahaemolyticus, but the genomic sequence of the strain indicated that it belonged to Vibrio harveyi. The sequence data included plasmid-like sequences and putative virulence genes.

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The plot thickens further!

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Flavobacterium 2015 October 27-29, 2015 Auburn University Auburn, AL, USA

Flavobacterium 2015 October 27-29, 2015 Auburn University Auburn, AL, USA | ASEM Aquaculture Health | Scoop.it

The 4th International Conference on members of the genus Flavobacterium will begin on Tuesday, October 27th, 2015 and end Thursday, October 29th. The meeting will take place in the city of Auburn, a small but thriving community in the state of Alabama and home to Auburn University.


This conference is a continuation of previous Flavobacterium meetings held at Shepherdstown, WV, USA (2007), Paris, France (2009), and Turku, Finland (2012). The main focus of this conference will be on fish pathogens, but there will be specific sessions dedicated to the biology, diversity, physiology, and genetics of non-pathogenic members of the genus as well as to fish pathogens of related genera such as Tenacibaculum and Chryseobacterium.

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Economic impacts of aquatic parasites on global finfish production | The Advocate

Economic impacts of aquatic parasites on global finfish production | The Advocate | ASEM Aquaculture Health | Scoop.it

Obligate and opportunistic parasites play a critical role in determining the productivity, sustainability and economic viability of global finfish aquaculture enterprises. Without stringent and appropriate control measures, the impacts of these pathogens can often be significant.

Estimating the true impacts of each parasite event, however, is complicated, as costs can be affected by a diverse assortment of environmental and management factors. The factors can range from direct losses in production to the more indirect costs of longer-term control and management of infections and the wider, downstream socioeconomic impacts on livelihoods and satellite industries associated with the primary producer.

Certain parasite infections may be predictable, as they occur regularly, while others are unpredictable because they arise sporadically. In each case, there can be costs for treating and managing infections once they are established, but for predictable infections, there also are costs associated with prophylactic treatment and management. This article provides an overview of issues and estimates of economic impacts drawn from a larger study.

 

John Bostock's insight:

The article only covers finfish aquaculture, but estimates of US$ 1-9 billion show what a major issue this is for the sector. It would be interesting to work out what percentage of this figure is spent each year on research and development to find solutions (my guess is between 1 and 10%); what the risk/benefit analysis of that investment looks like; and more importantly, who benefits and who has the incentives (and means) to invest...

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Post Doc: ballan wrasse health – University of Stirling

Post Doc: ballan wrasse health – University of Stirling | ASEM Aquaculture Health | Scoop.it

The Institute of Aquaculture, School of Natural Sciences is offering a post-doctoral research assistant (PDRA) post to work with Profs. Sandra Adams and Herve Migaud on a project focussed on ballan wrasse health. Specifically the post will investigate the immune response of ballan wrasse and develop vaccine strategies against bacterial pathogen atypical Aeromonas salmonicida.

The post is offered as a fixed term, full-time appointment for 24 months to start 1 October 2015 or as soon as possible thereafter. 

John Bostock's insight:

Immunology research post at the Institute of Aquaculture - closing date for applications is 17th September 2015

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A rare chronic disease found in farmed salmon for the first time in Tasmania

A rare chronic disease found in farmed salmon for the first time in Tasmania | ASEM Aquaculture Health | Scoop.it
Rare, chronic, fish disease found in farmed salmon in Tasmania's Macquarie Harbour.
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Guide to Using Drugs, Biologics & Other Chemicals in Aquaculture

Guide to Using Drugs, Biologics & Other Chemicals in Aquaculture | ASEM Aquaculture Health | Scoop.it

"All aquaculture operations have occasional demand for drugs, biologics, and other chemicals, collectively referred to as “regulated products”. The Guide to Using Drugs, Biologics, and Other Chemicals in Aquaculture was developed by the Fish Culture Section WGADCB as a comprehensive introduction to the use of regulated products in aquaculture and a resource for fisheries professionals. The Guide includes updated information on aquaculture drugs and contacts for providing feedback. A companion treatment calculator is available in both Excel 97-2003 (.xls) and Excel 2010 (.xlsx) formats. These tools are indispensable for those in need of detailed information regarding the legal and judicious use of these products in aquaculture."

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Updated guide available from AFS-FCS
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H2020 New Call for Access

H2020 New Call for Access | ASEM Aquaculture Health | Scoop.it
The AQUAEXCEL2020 project invites proposals from European research groups for scientific research that utilises the facilities of any of the participating aquaculture research infrastructures. The AQUAEXCEL2020 project unites major aquaculture experimental facilities with capacity to undertake experimental trials on a selection of commercially important fish aquaculture species and system types. These installations are made available to the research community for Transnational Access (TNA) with the support of the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme. Transnational Access involves a research group in one country collaborating with one or more AQUAEXCEL2020 Infrastructures that are located in a different country to the applicant, and which offer facilities and expertise not available in their own country. The facilities available cover the entire range of production systems (cage, pond, recirculation, flowthrough, hatchery and disease challenge); environments (freshwater, marine, cold, temperate and warm water); scales (small, medium and industrial scale); fish species (salmonids, cold and warm water marine fish, freshwater fish and artemia); and fields of expertise (nutrition, physiology, health & welfare, genetics, engineering, monitoring & management technologies). Interested researchers can propose projects that involve visits of one or in some cases two people to the chosen research infrastructure for periods of up to three months. Access to the research infrastructures and associated travel and subsistence expenses will be paid for under the project. The establishment of new transnational collaborations is strongly encouraged, as well as the participation by SMEs.
John Bostock's insight:
The Second Call for AQUAEXCEL Transnational Access Projects is now open with a deadline of 8th July.
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Gent University: INTERNATIONAL TRAINING PROGRAMME ON HEALTH MANAGEMENT IN AQUACULTURE

Gent University: INTERNATIONAL TRAINING PROGRAMME  ON HEALTH MANAGEMENT IN AQUACULTURE | ASEM Aquaculture Health | Scoop.it
19 September - 17 December 2016, Gent University.

The training programme consists of theoretical parts: lectures, case studies, peer-to-peer teaching; and practical parts: wet lab experience (for instance on biofloc operation) and study visits. The lectures, which will include microteaching sessions, will make up the majority of the program. Over a period of 10 weeks, 4 courses will be taught: 

Diseases in Aquaculture by Prof. Peter Bossier & Prof. Annemie Decostere 
Virology by Prof. Hans Nauwynck 
Microbial Community Management by Dr. Peter De Schryver Immunology by Prof. Daisy Vanrompay
 
A number of guest lectures by international authorities is foreseen by Prof. Yoram Avnimelech, Prof. Jorge Galindo-Villegas and Prof. Olav Vadstein.
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MSD Animal Health Hosts Fish Health Workshops

MSD Animal Health Hosts Fish Health Workshops | ASEM Aquaculture Health | Scoop.it
UK - The team from MSD Animal Health, hosted three events across Scotland, to share results of its latest fish health monitoring programmes.
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The Basics of Aquatic Medicine - Webinar

The Basics of Aquatic Medicine - Webinar | ASEM Aquaculture Health | Scoop.it

'Welcome to the 2nd live webinar hosted by WAVMA and IVSA Standing Committee on Veterinary Education (SCoVE)! In this webinar, world leading aquatic medicine specialist Chris Walster will be talking about 'The basics of aquatic medicine' and 'What Vets need to know about fish?'.

 

This unique webinar will provide a fresh insight into the medicine of aquatic species, plus a vets role in the fish world.

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18th March 2016 at 18:00 GMT
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Aquaculturedirectory's curator insight, March 14, 6:23 AM
18th March 2016 at 18:00 GMT
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Bacterial Disease is Leading Cause of Mortality in Lumpfish

Bacterial Disease is Leading Cause of Mortality in Lumpfish | ASEM Aquaculture Health | Scoop.it
NORWAY - A new study by the Fisheries and Aquaculture Industry Research Fund (FHF) has identified atypical furunculosis as the "worst offender" of bacterial diseases in lumpfish.
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First Complete Picture of Salmon Gut Bacteria will Help Industry Sustainability

First Complete Picture of Salmon Gut Bacteria will Help Industry Sustainability | ASEM Aquaculture Health | Scoop.it

UK - Researchers from around the world are paving the way for a more ecologically sustainable salmon farming industry with the first complete picture of wild Atlantic salmon gut bacteria.This week, researcher Dr Martin Llewellyn (Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, University of Glasgow) and co-workers in Ireland, Scotland, Canada, USA and Wales took a first step towards understanding the role of salmon gut bacteria in salmon health. After two years intensive sampling from adult salmon feeding grounds in West Greenland, returning adults and freshwater juvenile salmon in Canada and Ireland, they have developed the first compete picture of wild Atlantic Salmon gut bacterial diversity across the distribution of the species. The data show that bacterial community composition within the gut was not significantly impacted by geography. Instead life-cycle stage (parr, smolt, adult) strongly defined both the diversity and identity of gut microbial assemblages in the gut, with evidence for community destabilisation in migratory phases. Amongst other observations, Mycoplasmas were recovered in all life-cycle stages in huge abundance, suggesting a potentially vital role for this class of bacteria for gut health. 

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This is a very interesting and developing area of research

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Smart Shrimp Aquaculture Workshop 20-22 January 2016, Thailand

Smart Shrimp Aquaculture Workshop 20-22 January 2016, Thailand | ASEM Aquaculture Health | Scoop.it
Shrimp farming industry is currently passing through a challenging phase, mostly because of disease conditions like the Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease (AHPND), still popular worldwide as EMS - the Early Mortality Syndrome, and that caused by the microsporidian parasite Enterocytozoon hepatopenaei (EHP). These are widespread in Thailand and are feared to take new forms across diverse farming situations. Many shrimp farmers have no clue as to how this critical situation could be controlled. To manage these and the emerging challenges, farmers at the regional level need to be updated with the latest research, and also acquire adequate expertise and practical skills to efficiently organize their resources for achieving improved production levels. This workshop on Smart shrimp farming is organized jointly by Asian Institute of Technology (AIT), Bangkok, Thailand; Asian Pacific Chapter of the World Aquaculture Society; and Blue Aqua International Ltd., Bangkok, Thailand. 
 
The workshop will bring together world’s leading experts who will present many proven solutions to stem the EMS tide and set the goal for a more prosperous shrimp farming using the latest technological advancements on the topic. It is hoped that the event will be greatly beneficial for participants to generate a wealth of information from and apply these techniques for improving shrimp production in their aquaculture enterprises.
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Sustainable Aquaculture Courses: Webinar - The Fish Site

Sustainable Aquaculture Courses: Webinar - The Fish Site | ASEM Aquaculture Health | Scoop.it

The Fish Vet Group and St Andrews University are making recorded webinars associated with their courses in sustainable aquaculture available via The Fish Site. The latest recordings are on parasites of aquaculture species.

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Great free learning resource

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Genetic variation for resistance to WSS, AHPND in Pacific white shrimp | The Advocate

Genetic variation for resistance to WSS, AHPND in Pacific white shrimp | The Advocate | ASEM Aquaculture Health | Scoop.it

White spot syndrome (WSS) and acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) have become the main causes of economic loss in shrimp production worldwide. Prevention of these diseases is very difficult to achieve, and efforts to control them have often seen inconsistent results. Moreover, some intensive production systems seem to favor their rapid spread.

In such scenarios, breeding for disease resistance is a viable option to deal with this issue in commercial shrimp culture. Breeding shrimp for disease resistance is worthwhile when there are no other simple, cost-effective control measures, and there are genetic differences for resistance to the pathogen.

John Bostock's insight:

Good to see this research ongoing - clearly challenging though.

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blueAmp: Simple and rapid detection test for streptococcosis in Nile tilapia

blueAmp: Simple and rapid detection test for streptococcosis in Nile tilapia | ASEM Aquaculture Health | Scoop.it

Streptococcosis is a major bacterial infection in many cultured fish species, damaging the production of intensive aquaculture species, particularly Nile tilapia. The infection is caused by Streptococcus agalactiae and Strep. Iniae. 

“blueAmp” has been developed as a simple and rapid assay to detect Strep. agalactiae and Strep. Iniae.  The assay is based on DNA amplification by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and a detection of DNA products by colorimetric change of hydroxynaphthol blue dye. The result can be observed by a color change through the naked eyes.  This method takes approximately an hour, which is significantly less than the time required by a standard test which can take upto 6 days.

“blueAmp” is useful for screening broodstock and fry before stocking and for monitoring fish health in grow-out pond.This technology is developed by Bioengineering and Sensing Technology Laboratory, and is being validated with industry before it becomes available for licensing.

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Ram C. Bhujel's curator insight, June 3, 6:04 PM
Globally, about 70 million tons of seafood is produced from farming annually. More and more people are consuming seafood due its health benefits. Additional 160 million tons will be needed by 2050. After “Green and White Revolutions”, ‘Blue Revolution” is the need of the present which is possible only when thousands of new generation leaders are produced, who ultimately will train millions of other people learn how to breed and grow fish or aquatic animals sustainably applying scientific principles and adopting as profitable businesses. As a result, every country should be able to take advantage of the sector like that by Bangladesh, China, India, Thailand, Vietnam and many others. From seafood export, annually China earns nearly US$20 billion, while India, Thailand and Vietnam each receives US$6-7 billion per year. 

Aquaculture is on the spotlight nowadays. It has attracted so much public attention as well as private investment because it has emerged as one of the most profitable and competitive businesses. So far, we have trained thousands of entrepreneurs from all over the world. Some of them have started their own businesses, while others manage large corporate or government farms profitably. 

Now we plan to start a 10-month, Professional Master's degree program in Aquaculture to offer up-to-date knowledge in aquaculture and help develop skills on proven innovative technologies to interested investors, entrepreneurs, managers and other professionals so that their dreams come true. The followings are the proposed courses: --- 
1. Aqua Business Management - Principles and Practices 
2. Global Aquaculture Business - Managerial Perspective 
3. Business Communication 
4. Environmental Management & Aquaculture Sustainability 
5. Marketing Management 
6. Aquaculture Certification and Quality Control 
7. Aquaculture Project Selection & Management 
8. Integrated Aquaculture 
9. Entrepreneurship and Business Plan Development 
10. Aqua Seed Business 
11. Managing Aquaculture Technology 
12. Seafood Supply Chain Management 
13. Aquaculture Economics and Managerial Accounting 
14. Corporate Social Responsibility and Ethics 
15. Post Harvest Management and Food Safety 
16. Decision Making and Negotiations 
17. Seafood Trade and Business Law 
18. Statistics for Managers 
19. Aqua Feed Business 
20. Fish Health Management 
Case studies: Shrimp/prawn farms, Tilapia Farms, Catfish/Pangasius Farms, Seafood markets, Processing companies, Feed companies, Hatcheries, and so on. 

More details will be available later. First, we would like to have your your comments and suggestions. Please write here comments or send email to: Director@aarm-asialink.info 
Thank you very much.
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Job: Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Aquatic Animal Veterinary Pathology - University of Stirling

Job: Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Aquatic Animal Veterinary Pathology - University of Stirling | ASEM Aquaculture Health | Scoop.it

We wish to appoint a person who can develop and lead the area of aquatic animal pathology.
The successful candidate would be expected to develop their own area of research and provide support to other groups. Undertaking teaching on undergraduate, postgraduate and CPD courses and act as Named Veterinary Surgeon for Home Office purposes. The post, at lecturer or senior lecturer level is an exciting opportunity to contribute to the ongoing success of the Stirling Institute of Aquaculture in one of our core areas of scientific endeavour.

The successful candidate will have expertise in aquatic pathology and a track record of external grant funding for projects would be desirable. The successful candidate will have access to existing histopathology laboratory facilities and other imaging infrastructure (e.g. confocal scanning-laser microscope, laser dissection microscope, slides scanner, Scanning Electron Microscope, Transmission Electron Microscope).

The capacity to make a direct contribution to research, teaching and leadership within the programmes of the School is expected together with support, development and guidance of colleagues. They will be able to demonstrate familiarity with, and understanding of, the challenges and opportunities that face higher education in Scotland, the UK and internationally.

John Bostock's insight:

Excellent employment opportunity at the very international Institute of Aquaculture at the University of Stirling in Scotland. Closing date 24 Sept 2015.

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