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Coal Kills

Coal Kills | Asbestos | Scoop.it
The first ever estimation of death and disease due to coal-fired power plants in India estimates between 85,000 to 115,000 people killed in 2011-12.
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Asbestos
OSH issues due to Asbestos
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Scientific journal publishes 2nd Erratum regarding false information by scientists funded by asbestos interests

Scientific journal publishes 2nd Erratum regarding false information by scientists funded by asbestos interests | Asbestos | Scoop.it
Kathleen Ruff, RightOnCanada.ca
The Erratum states that evidence cited by the authors is non-existent
Stefania Boccia and Carlo La Vecchia
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Asbestos Justice: The Time Has Come!

Asbestos Justice: The Time Has Come!    From Japan to Brazil via Italy and France, over recent days asbestos victims have secured amazing judicial wins.

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660 abandoned asbestos mines to be rehabilitated in SA

660 abandoned asbestos mines to be rehabilitated in SA | Asbestos | Scoop.it

Global programme and construction consultancy Turner & Townsend is providing quantity surveying expertise as part of a major programme by the South African

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Union leader calls for national registry to track asbestos

Union leader calls for national registry to track asbestos | Asbestos | Scoop.it
A new generation of workers and homeowners needs to be made aware of hazardous material’s locations, WorkSafeBC says
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How the world's biggest asbestos factory tried to stop campaigners exposing its dangers

How the world's biggest asbestos factory tried to stop campaigners exposing its dangers | Asbestos | Scoop.it
Executives at the world’s biggest asbestos factory spied on journalists and environmental campaigners who exposed the killer dust’s dangers and then launched a covert campaign to accuse them of being communists, it can be revealed. Secret industry documents seen by The Independent reveal that the executives at Rochdale-based asbestos giant Turner and Newall monitored people they considered to be “subversive” and kept a dossier on their activities at the height of the debate about the mineral’s safety in the 1980s.
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EU helps Vietnam phase out asbestos - News VietNamNet

EU helps Vietnam phase out asbestos - News VietNamNet | Asbestos | Scoop.it

VietNamNet Bridge – Asbestos has been an important construction
material for Vietnam and a valuable export product over the previous
years, however, in 2014 the Vietnamese government decided to phase out
production...

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open_letter_to_global_asbestos_industry_dec8_2015_100.pdf

Dec 8, 2015: Asbestos victims and ban asbestos campaigners in Asia have joined forces with international colleagues to declare their commitment to end asbestos use in a letter published today on this website.
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Schools fail to keep track of asbestos - The Boston Globe

Schools fail to keep track of asbestos - The Boston Globe | Asbestos | Scoop.it
Schools in Massachusetts appear to be ignoring federal asbestos laws, and the state has done little to enforce it.
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AP Staffers Win Prestigious Indian Journalism Awards

AP Staffers Win Prestigious Indian Journalism Awards | Asbestos | Scoop.it
Two Associated Press journalists are among the winners of the Ramnath Goenka Excellence in Journalism Awards, India's most prestigious, for work exposing the public health and environmental damage done by the country's asbestos industry and capturing the devastation of last year's floods in the...
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Sri Lanka to set standards for red clay roofing tiles upon asbestos ban

Sri Lanka to set standards for red clay roofing tiles upon asbestos ban | Asbestos | Scoop.it
Nov 19 (LBO) – Sri Lanka is in the process of setting quality standards for red clay roofing tiles while increasing productivity to reduce cost of production upon the ban of asbestos roofing by 201...
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Toyota Warns Australians of Fake Brake Pads with Asbestos

Toyota Warns Australians of Fake Brake Pads with Asbestos | Asbestos | Scoop.it
The Japanese manufacturer said more than 500,000 of its cars may contain counterfeit brake pads with deadly asbestos.
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Inside a Canberra Mr Fluffy asbestos home before demolition takes place

Inside a Canberra Mr Fluffy asbestos home before demolition takes place | Asbestos | Scoop.it
For ACT government asbestos taskforce boss Andrew Kefford, wall-to-ceiling blue paint inside an otherwise unremarkable Scullin home is proof enough of the threat Mr Fluffy poses to Canberra.
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Asbestos found in new buildings in Dubai and Abu Dhabi despite ban | The National

Asbestos found in new buildings in Dubai and Abu Dhabi despite banCompanies in Dubai and Abu Dhabi that specialise in the safe handling of the dangerous construction material have said that, besides their core business of removing asbestos from old buildings, they are sometimes hired to do expensive removals in new projects.

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National Asbestos Bans

#Ibasecretariat POP QUIZ: When did #France ban #asbestos ?
Lorsque la France a fait interdire l' #amiante?
https://t.co/5vkwGynOgv

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Group urges Estrada to ensure PNB building’s safe demolition | The Manila Times Online

Group urges Estrada to ensure PNB building’s safe demolition | The Manila Times Online | Asbestos | Scoop.it
Group urges Estrada to ensure PNB building’s safe demolition January 26, 2016 11:00 pm by NELSON BADILLA A moderate labor group on Tuesday called on Mayor Joseph Estrada to ensure that the demolition of [...]...
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Cases of cancer caused by asbestos on the rise, StatsCan says

Cases of cancer caused by asbestos on the rise, StatsCan says | Asbestos | Scoop.it
The numbers of cases and deaths from mesothelioma, a deadly cancer caused primarily by workplace asbestos exposure, have continued to rise and show no signs of abating, recently updated figures from Statistics Canada show.
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Contractor sentenced to 30 days for shoddy asbestos removal work - 680 NEWS

Contractor sentenced to 30 days for shoddy asbestos removal work - 680 NEWS | Asbestos | Scoop.it

A contractor who has done asbestos removal work in the GTA, Hamilton, Barrie and Kingston area has been sentenced to time behind bars.

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Asbestos neglect | Practical Ethics

Asbestos neglect | Practical Ethics | Asbestos | Scoop.it
Written by Tom Douglas This is an unedited version of an article originally published by The Conversation   ‘Calais Jungle Camp littered with asbestos’, ‘Buckingham Palace could be vacated to remove asbestos’, ‘Safety concerns for refugees and workers as Nauru asbestos removal program kicks off’. Headlines such as these occur with monotonous regularity. Widespread asbestos use throughout much of the 20th century has ensured that the next contamination scandal is never far off, and asbestos-related legal decisions and personal tragedies often make the news as well. But despite the ongoing media attention, asbestos has not captured the public imagination as a public health threat, at least, not in comparison to other comparable threats like excessive sun exposure and drink driving. Asbestos is a versatile fibrous mineral that can be cheaply mined and has unusual fire resistance and durability. Its use exploded in the twentieth century, when it was included in such diverse products as automobile brake linings, pipe insulation, ceiling and floor tiles, textured paints, concrete, mattresses, electric blankets, heaters, ironing boards and even piano felts. There is no safe threshold for exposure to asbestos dust, with even single exposures having been linked to cancer. Rates of asbestos-related cancer have recently been on the rise in Europe and Japan and look set to climb in many developing countries where asbestos is still being widely used, often without safety precautions. According to WHO estimates, asbestos now causes more deaths globally than excessive sun exposure. In the UK it is estimated to cause almost three times as many deaths as road traffic accidents. Yet awareness about the threat posed by asbestos is often low, even in high-risk groups. A recent UK survey found that only a third of at-risk tradespeople were able to identify all of the measures required to work safely with asbestos. An earlier study found that British plumbers recognized only one third of their actual exposures to asbestos. By contrast, a number of comparable public health threats have been the subject of major health promotion campaigns and now enjoy a high profile. Consider road safety. Speeding and drink driving have been the subject of extensive education programmes and police interventions in many countries, and few could claim ignorance of the risks that they pose. The terms ‘sober driver’ and ‘breathalyzer’ are now part of popular culture in many parts of the world. A similar story can be told for sun exposure. In recent decades, huge efforts have been made to draw the risks of UV radiation to the attention of the public. In many countries, awareness of the risks of sunburn is now high, and parents who allow their children to burn are widely regarded as negligent. In Australia and New Zealand, which have the highest rates of melanoma, wide-brimmed hats are now commonplace on school playgrounds, as are near full-body swimsuits at the beach. Nothing similar is true of asbestos. Health campaigns have been largely limited to particular at-risk professionals such as plumbers and demolition workers, and even in those groups, have often been ineffective. Asbestos enjoys a high profile only among workplace health and safety officers, public health experts and the subset of tradespeople who have received extensive training in handling the substance. What explains the relative lack of public education and understanding regarding asbestos? One factor may be the perception that asbestos is a disease of the past: many current asbestos-related deaths are due to exposures before the 1980s, when strict regulations on the use of asbestos were started to bite. However, asbestos remains a pervasive presence in homes and workplaces, and renovation, demolitions or natural disintegration of building materials can lead to significant exposures. Moreover, asbestos continues to be mined and used in many parts of Asia and South America, often without safety precautions. A second factor may be the perception that asbestos is a concern only for those in specific high risk occupations. This view is difficult to sustain: home renovators and to some extent inhabitants are also at risk. In a recent Australian survey, over 60% of DIY home renovators reported having been exposed to asbestos during renovation work, and this may underestimate true exposure, given low awareness of the range of applications in which asbestos has been used. It had previously been thought that only workplace exposures were sufficient to cause cancer, but Australian national data now indicates that around 40% of people diagnosed with mesothelioma, an especially deadly cancer thought to be caused almost solely by asbestos, report no workplace exposure to the substance. So the question remains: what explains the lack of public education and understanding about asbestos? A powerful asbestos industry that has consistently cast doubt on the health risks posed by the substance has surely played a role, particularly in countries with significant asbestos industries such as the US, UK, Australia, Italy, Belgium and Canada. Perhaps the perception of asbestos-related disease as a problem for the working classes has also contributed to a lack of attention from predominantly middle-class politicians and officials. (Melanoma is, by contrast, disproportionately a disease of the middle classes.) The association of asbestos with ‘boring’ workplace health and safety measures may have also have helped to prevent asbestos risks from capturing the public imagination as have health risks from sun exposure, smoking, drink driving and unprotected sex. Yet though these factors might explain the relative neglect of asbestos, they do nothing to justify it. They provide no reason to give asbestos anything other than the attention that its devastating health costs warrant. The greatest need for attention is in developing countries. While levels of public awareness in the developed world leave much to be desired, most developed countries have at least adopted strict regulations on the importation, sale, use and disposal of asbestos-containing products. By contrast, use of asbestos is exploding, and is largely unregulated, in many developing countries, including India, Indonesia and Thailand. Until recently, Canada, historically the largest producer of asbestos, was still mining the substance and exporting it to India and elsewhere, even though its use was all but banned at home. Russia, Kazakhstan and Brazil continue to mine and export chrysotile (white) asbestos, the only type of asbestos still being commercially used. Unless asbestos rapidly becomes a ‘big issue’ in global health, there is a risk that the asbestos-related cancer epidemic currently affecting much of Europe and Australasia will be repeated elsewhere, and perhaps on a larger scale. More should be done in the richest countries too. Much exposure to asbestos can be attributed to lack of public knowledge and difficulties in identifying the substance, which frequently looks similar to safe alternative products. There is a strong case for widely-publicized home testing services, which should be made freely available to all tradespeople and home renovators. Risks could be significantly reduced by information campaigns, which should extend beyond the highest risk professions. Australia has recently taken significant steps in this direction, introducing an asbestos awareness month and creating resources to help homeowners identify asbestos. Other countries should follow suit and, ideally, go further. Asbestos has proven itself more than dangerous enough to warrant public health campaigns of the sort that have been used to fight road deaths, melanoma and sexually transmitted infections. Acknowledgments: Thanks to Laura Van den Borre and Laurie Kazan-Allen for assisting with my research for this post.    
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Collegium Ramazzini response to 'Asbestos, asbestosis, and cancer, the Helsinki criteria for diagnosis and attribution 2014: recommendations'. - PubMed - NCBI

Collegium Ramazzini response to 'Asbestos, asbestosis, and cancer, the Helsinki criteria for diagnosis and attribution 2014: recommendations'. - PubMed - NCBI | Asbestos | Scoop.it
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2015 Dec 4. pii: 3535. doi: 10.5271/sjweh.3535. [Epub ahead of print] LETTER
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Concordia prof under pressure to denounce colleague's pro-asbestos paper

A spokesman says the university has dealt with the issue, and will not publish a formal retraction based on the issues raised by anti-asbestos groups
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Vietnam Asbestos Offensive

Mohit Gupta's insight:

“For years, the Government of Vietnam has invested in research into the production of safer substitutes for asbestos-cement roofing materials. Acknowledging the public health risk posed by asbestos, many Ministries support our call for an asbestos ban. The recent workshop was a blatant attempt by vested interests to delay progress in order to continue making money regardless of the deadly consequences to workers and consumers. In our opinion, the speakers’ motivation and lack of credence were obvious. Their failure to convince delegates of the possibility of using asbestos safely was obvious from the reaction of the workshop attendees and the lack of media coverage which ensued after the event.”

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James Hardie cuts asbestos compo fund payments

James Hardie cuts asbestos compo fund payments | Asbestos | Scoop.it
James Hardie has cut its contribution to its legacy asbestos compensation scheme, despite making a 22 per cent profit over the past year.
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Chrysotile Asbestos: Voices from South-East Asia

All types of asbestos cause lung cancer, mesothelioma, cancer of the larynx and ovary, and asbestosis (fibrosis of the lungs). Exposure to asbestos occurs th...
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