arts visuels
Follow
Find
5.6K views | +0 today
arts visuels
ressources concernant le cinéma, la photographie, la peinture, la plasticité, l'exploration visuelle, les arts graphiques...
Curated by mtrahan
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by mtrahan
Scoop.it!

Liu Wei: Cityscape Installations

Liu Wei: Cityscape Installations | arts visuels | Scoop.it

Chinese artist Liu Wei is a man to watch in the new Chinese art scene. He creates installations, paintings and videos oscillating between order and disorder. His installations/cityscape sculptures are at times sprawling and depict cities in a state of metamorphosis, something he can relate to in the development of his native city, Beijing.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mtrahan
Scoop.it!

Sculptures Made Out of a Single Paper Sheet

Sculptures Made Out of a Single Paper Sheet | arts visuels | Scoop.it

Peter Callesen (born 1967) is a Danish artist who makes incredibly complex and beautiful sculptures out of a single sheet of paper. He has an exceptional talent in combining the minimalism of a big crisp white sheet of paper with the complexity of meticulously cut and folded paper and uses the two to build out some really beautiful compositions.

more...
3SP's comment, January 31, 2012 12:04 AM
Magnifique, merci pour la découverte.
winter park fl shopping's comment, February 21, 2012 9:30 AM
Wow!!!! That is so cool, I have always love oragomi this is just on a whole diffrent level!! Wonderful art!!


<a href="http://www.pip.com/centers/merrittislandfl992">; merritt island fl banners </a>
Scooped by mtrahan
Scoop.it!

Les 75 plus belles photos de Street Art en 2011

Les 75 plus belles photos de Street Art en 2011 | arts visuels | Scoop.it
Que ce soit en modifiant du mobilier urbain, des passages cloutés ou des éléments naturels, les street-artists ont usé de leur imagination pour produire des oeuvres souvent éphémères qui resteront cependant dans les mémoires grace aux différents clichés que l’on peut retrouver sur le net. Le moins que l’on puisse dire c’est que l’année 2011 aura été riche en inspiration…
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mtrahan
Scoop.it!

The Complete History Of Art References In The Simpsons

The Complete History Of Art References In The Simpsons | arts visuels | Scoop.it
Now in it’s twenty-third season, The Simpsons is the longest-running scripted television series in American prime-time. In four hundred plus episodes, the obvious laughs are often low-brow, but what has made the show such a success season after season are the satirical takes on popular culture. While the film, television and music references are easy to recognize, The Simpsons is often rather erudite with frequent nods to the art world.
Spanning from the renaissance masters to contemporary minds, here’s the complete history of art references in every Simpsons episode ever.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mtrahan
Scoop.it!

Remembering Eve Arnold, Pioneering Photojournalist

Remembering Eve Arnold, Pioneering Photojournalist | arts visuels | Scoop.it

Eve Arnold, one of the pioneering women of photojournalism, died Wednesday at the age of 99.

 

Widely known for her photographs of Marilyn Monroe and other celebrities, Arnold just as often photographed the poor and the unknown. “I don’t see anybody as either ordinary or extraordinary,” she told the BBC in 1990. “I see them simply as people in front of my lens.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mtrahan
Scoop.it!

Balancing on the Empire State [photos]

Balancing on the Empire State [photos] | arts visuels | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mtrahan
Scoop.it!

Nyiragongo Crater: Journey to the Center of the World [photos]

Nyiragongo Crater: Journey to the Center of the World [photos] | arts visuels | Scoop.it
In June 2010, a team of scientists and intrepid explorers stepped onto the shore of the lava lake boiling in the depths of Nyiragongo Crater, in the heart of the Great Lakes region of Africa. The team had dreamed of this: walking on the shores of the world's largest lava lake. Members of the team had been dazzled since childhood by the images of the 1960 documentary "The Devil's Blast" by Haroun Tazieff, who was the first to reveal to the public the glowing red breakers crashing at the bottom of Nyiragongo crater. Photographer Olivier Grunewald was within a meter of the lake itself, giving us a unique glimpse of its molten matter.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mtrahan
Scoop.it!

Soldier portraits: Before, During, and After War

Soldier portraits: Before, During, and After War | arts visuels | Scoop.it

How do the faces of soldiers change — before, during, and then after war? Can we detect profound or subtle psychological shifts just by looking at their portraits?

This is precisely the challenge that Claire Felicie presents with her series of triptych portraits of marines of the 13th infantry company of the Royal Netherlands Marine Corps. The series, Here are the Young Men (Marked), shows close-cropped portraits of the Dutch marines before, during and after they were deployed to Uruzgan, Afghanistan in 2009-2010.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mtrahan
Scoop.it!

Fukushima: Inside the Exclusion Zone

Fukushima: Inside the Exclusion Zone | arts visuels | Scoop.it

In June, National Geographic sent AP photographer David Guttenfelder into the exclusion zone around the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station, which was badly damaged in the earthquake and tsunami earlier this year. He captured images of communities that had become ghost towns, with pets and farm animals roaming the streets. Later, in November, Guttenfelder returned to photograph the crippled reactor facility itself as members of the media were allowed inside for the first time since the triple disaster last March. In some places, the reactor buildings appear to be little more than heaps of twisted metal and crumbling concrete. Tens of thousands of area residents remain displaced, with little indication of when, or if, they may ever return to their homes. Collected here are some images from these trips -- the first six are from the December 2011 issue of National Geographic magazine, now on newsstands, and more photos can be seen at the National Geographic website.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mtrahan
Scoop.it!

Stanley Kubrick | Photographs of New York from the 1940s

Stanley Kubrick | Photographs of New York from the 1940s | arts visuels | Scoop.it

Before he began directing films, Stanley Kubrick was a photo-journalist with Look magazine, starting his career in 1946, and was, apparently, their youngest photographer on record. Kubrick snapped over 10,000 pictures, sometimes hiding his camera in a paper bag to achieve a more intimate and natural image. Kubrick’s photographs of New York in the 1940s, have the look of gritty movie stills from some imagined film noir, revealing intriguing personal narratives, for which the viewer can compose their own script. A selection of Kubrick’s photographs are available to buy from V and M, with proceeds going to the Museum of the City of New York.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mtrahan
Scoop.it!

National Geographic Photo Contest 2011

National Geographic Photo Contest 2011 | arts visuels | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mtrahan
Scoop.it!

Magnum at the Movies (photographies du cinéma)

Magnum at the Movies (photographies du cinéma) | arts visuels | Scoop.it
Photographers have been snapping images on film sets since the dawn of cinema. Often they are hired set photographers, whose work, explains the Italian film critic Alberto Barbera, is “limited mostly to documenting the work of a film, following the director’s work and often concerned only with satisfying the directives of the studio’s publicity departments, which need certain shots for promoting the film even before they finish making it.” But other photographers have taken the set itself as their subject, capturing not only the illusory world created by film but also the atmosphere of a production: a horse carried across a Texas ranch; the upturned face of Marilyn powdered through a car window.

A new show at the National Cinema Museum in Turin, which Barbera directs, showcases the movie work of Magnum photographers, who leaned heavily on friendships with the stars, he writes, “to create images that are often surprising, always original, and almost never what one would expect.” Here’s a look at “Magnum Sul Set.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mtrahan
Scoop.it!

32 Days of Movies | Au audiovisual journey through 366 films

32 Days of Movies | Au audiovisual journey through 366 films | arts visuels | Scoop.it

Sit back, press play, and launch a voyage through movie history. This page contains every entry (so far) in "32 Days of Movies," a video clip series which serves as an audiovisual guide to 350 films. As I noted in my introduction, this series is not meant to be canonical, nor a list of favorites; rather it uses my own DVD collection as a basis to look at different movies and different eras in cinema history. When the project is complete (in early November 2011) I will unveil a picture post featuring screen-caps from every single selection, so that the clip in question (or rather the chapter containing it) will be one click away. For now, however, the directory will be organized solely by chapter.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mtrahan
Scoop.it!

Metamaus, un livre pour en chasser un autre (Le Devoir)

Metamaus, un livre pour en chasser un autre (Le Devoir) | arts visuels | Scoop.it

Le succès a été phénoménal, inattendu, et il a surtout emporté son créateur qui, 25 ans plus tard, espère enfin s'en relever. Avec MetaMaus (Flammarion), le bédéiste américain Art Spiegelman revient en profondeur et en détail sur Maus, ce chef-d'œuvre du 9e art — unique bande dessinée au monde à avoir reçu un prix Pulitzer en 1992 — dont il a été le géniteur, puis le prisonnier. Un ultime tour de piste pour parler de la genèse de ce roman graphique, qui place souris et chat au temps du nazisme et des camps de concentration, de sa famille qui se trouve au cœur du récit, du poids de la consécration... Une dernière fois, avant de passer à autre chose.

L'aveu tombe à la page 79: en donnant naissance à la série en bande dessinée Maus dans un obscur fanzine new-yorkais en 1972, intitulé Funny Animals, Art Spiegelman avait bel et bien envisagé le succès, mais pas de son vivant. «Je n'étais absolument pas préparé à l'accueil incroyablement positif de Maus, explique-t-il. Je faisais de la bédé qui exigeait du lecteur du temps et de l'attention plutôt qu'une simple lecture. Je considérais non sans arrogance que mon oeuvre serait appréciée à titre posthume.» Manqué.

Sur le grain de la publication underground, le destin tragique de Vladek et d'Anja, survivants des camps de la mort incarnés par des souris soumises à l'odieux projet de chats nazis, fait sensation, d'abord dans les cercles restreints qui s'y frottent.

En 1986, l'aventure de quelques pages devient livre sous le titre Maus, un survivant raconte. En deux volumes, Art Spiegelman y retrace, avec force et une dérangeante légèreté induite par le cadre animalier qu'il a choisi, l'enfer quotidien, méthodiquement orchestré, de ses parents, des juifs polonais passés des ghettos de Varsovie au camp de concentration d'Auschwitz. Le lecteur est époustouflé. La critique crie au génie. Et le prix Pulitzer vient consacrer le tout en 1992 en se posant pour la première fois de son histoire sur une bande dessinée.

La vie du bédéiste est alors marquée au fer rouge. Paradoxalement. «Maus était ma vision d'une époque sombre à travers les souvenirs de mon père, a expliqué l'auteur au Devoir lors d'une entrevue accordée il y a quelques mois depuis son studio dans la Grosse Pomme, alors qu'il se préparait à venir donner une conférence à Montréal. Je me doutais que ce livre allait être lu et relu, mais pas à ce point, et finalement j'ai passé les 25 dernières années à résister à ce succès, à fuir ce récit.» En vain.

Près de 30 ans après avoir mis en cases ce récit, le bilan est en deux teintes: «Oui, c'est super d'être reconnu pour son talent, dit le bédéiste en entrevue. Maus m'a apporté la sécurité financière, a contribué à déplacer certaines frontières de la bande dessinée, m'a amené à des endroits où je ne serais pas allé autrement, mais au final, cette bédé est en train aussi de me menacer. C'est difficile d'être toujours considéré comme l'homme d'un seul livre. Aujourd'hui, je veux en sortir, passer à autre chose, repartir à zéro», et surtout, comme il le dessine dans les premières pages de MetaMaus, faire tomber ce «satané masque» de souris qui lui colle durablement à la peau.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mtrahan
Scoop.it!

Palettes of Famous Painters

Palettes of Famous Painters | arts visuels | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mtrahan
Scoop.it!

Great Depression Photos: America in Color 1939-1943

Great Depression Photos: America in Color 1939-1943 | arts visuels | Scoop.it
These images, by photographers of the Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information, are some of the only color photographs taken of the effects of the Depression on America’s rural and small town populations. The photographs and captions are the property of the Library of Congress and were included in a 2006 exhibit Bound for Glory: America in Color.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mtrahan
Scoop.it!

Guggenheim Offers Free Books

Guggenheim Offers Free Books | arts visuels | Scoop.it

The Guggenheim Museum has digitized a ton of its out-of-print publications and is offering them free. This is a treasure of art literature as well as great book cover design. Congrats Guggenheim!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mtrahan
Scoop.it!

Guy Laramee | Sculptures de livres

Guy Laramee | Sculptures de livres | arts visuels | Scoop.it
Voici le projet de Guy Laramee qui transforme une pile de livres en de véritable sculptures grace à ses talents.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mtrahan
Scoop.it!

The Disappearing Face of New York [photos]

The Disappearing Face of New York [photos] | arts visuels | Scoop.it

"During the eight years it took James and Karla Murray to complete this project, one third of the stores they featured have closed..."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mtrahan
Scoop.it!

What the nanny saw: Housekeeper's stunning images of 1950s Chicago show working class America in a new light

What the nanny saw: Housekeeper's stunning images of 1950s Chicago show working class America in a new light | arts visuels | Scoop.it
After spending decades collecting dust the work of an unlikely artist has finally been uncovered.

To the outside world Vivian Maier was just a nanny and housekeeper working in Chicago. But she also had a hidden talent was not recognised until after her death in 2009.

Maier spent her life wandering the streets of Chicago with a Rolleflex camera strapped to her neck taking remarkable black and white pictures of a different side of the city, and a different side of life in America.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mtrahan
Scoop.it!

50 best photos from The Natural World

50 best photos from The Natural World | arts visuels | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mtrahan
Scoop.it!

The Great Mystery of Photography: How to Photograph a Black Dog

The Great Mystery of Photography: How to Photograph a Black Dog | arts visuels | Scoop.it

For the past decade, editor Eric Kessels has been sifting through the world’s amateur analog photography, culling fascinating collections of found photos around eccentric and esoteric themes. in almost every picture #9: black dog documents one family’s attempt to solve one of the grand mysteries of photography: How to photograph a black dog. The couple, befallen by their beloved pet’s complete blackness and the technical insufficiencies of their very vintage camera, try over and over again to capture endearing portraits of the pooch, only to find his likeness hovering between brooding silhouette and nondescript black blob.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mtrahan
Scoop.it!

Anselm Kiefer | L’art survivra à ses ruines (Leçon inaugurable du Collège de France)

Anselm Kiefer | L’art survivra à ses ruines (Leçon inaugurable du Collège de France) | arts visuels | Scoop.it
Je ne suis pas ici, avec vous, pour peindre un tableau. Je suis censé en parler et j’ai longtemps hésité à le faire, car tout ce que je pourrais vous en dire est déjà advenu et, de ce fait, je risquerais de vous infliger des redites. Car l’expérience m’a appris que le fait de parler d’un travail avant de l’avoir commencé signifie qu’il appartient déjà au passé, qu’on ne s’y attellera plus, qu’il s’est perdu dans les mots.20Qu’est-ce que le fait de parler d’art implique réellement ? Comment doit-on interpréter l’art, comprendre ce qu’il exprime ? Comment deviner ce que veut dire l’artiste et quelles sont ses motivations ?

La plupart des catalogues d’exposition contiennent des textes se référant aux œuvres. Rien de plus normal. Et dès qu’une exposition est inaugurée, les critiques d’art, dont c’est le rôle, s’en emparent. En France, des exemples célèbres témoignent d’une longue tradition qui unit les artistes aux écrivains, d’une certaine symbiose entre l’art et l’intellect. Pensons à Sartre et à ses écrits sur Wols, aux textes de Michel Leiris sur Bacon et à l’amitié qui le lia sa vie durant à Masson. Il en est de même des considérations de Maurice Merleau-Ponty à propos de l’art de Cézanne et qui sont une autre preuve de l’intérêt envers les artistes manifesté par cette corporation.

Il y a donc une réelle nécessité de s’exprimer sur l’art, afin de tenter de le saisir, de le circonscrire, d’en délimiter les frontières par la parole, de le congeler en quelque sorte, ou encore de le pacifier, et, dès lors, nous nous situons inévitablement dans l’aporie. Mais attention ! Car si nous assignons une place à l’art en lui désignant un espace à partir duquel il se doit d’agir selon ses propres critères, nous prenons dès lors le risque de l’appauvrir, de le rendre inoffensif – le risque qu’il soit circonscrit à un espace et que, une fois pacifié, il n’agisse plus à sa guise, ne cause plus de dommages, alors que l’art doit être subversif. L’art doit être nuisance.

Par ailleurs, une autre contradiction est nécessaire à son existence. D’un côté, l’art doit être séparé de la « vie », de tout ce qui n’est pas Art, et, de l’autre, il doit pouvoir dépasser continuellement ses propres limites pour mieux aller braconner en des contrées étrangères – que celles-ci soient le kitsch, l’art populaire ou l’artisanat d’art. Il en reviendra toujours métamorphosé et chargé d’un fardeau informe, le plus souvent hideux ; mais ce fardeau lui permettra de se renouveler, de se fluidifier au moyen de procédés qui lui appartiennent, comme si l’art était en possession du solvant universel, de l’alkahest cher aux alchimistes, qui l’ont recherché en vain.

Actuellement cependant, nous avons l’impression qu’après avoir effectué sa razzia, l’art ne parvient plus à transformer son butin, au risque de devenir sa propre proie. Est-ce là la réalité, ou survit-il encore tapi en quelque lieu, tel l’underground ? Devons-nous considérer ce phénomène de plus près pour mieux en trier le grain de l’ivraie ? Le vent qui sépare le grain de l’ivraie aurait-t-il faibli ? Nous faut-il pour autant actionner les canons à vent et proclamer : « L’Art est mort. – Vive l’Art ! » ?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mtrahan
Scoop.it!

[video] Nicolas Boutruche | Making Of

[video] Nicolas Boutruche | Making Of | arts visuels | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by mtrahan
Scoop.it!

Diane Arbus, anthropologie du contemporain (revue Inferno)

Diane Arbus, anthropologie du contemporain (revue Inferno) | arts visuels | Scoop.it
Diane Arbus commence la photographie à la fin des années 1940 et étudie auprès d’Alexei Brodovitch en 1954. Elle prend son envol à partir de 1957 en produisant ses premières images personnelles. En 1960, elle intègre la New School à New York, aux côtés de son camarade Richard Avedon. Elle y suit les cours de Lisette Model dont l’influence, thématique et esthétique, jouera un rôle considérable sur sa propre pratique. Diane Arbus inscrit son travail dans le style imposé par Walker Evans dans les années 1930, celui d’une photographie documentaire urbaine, sociale et esthétique. Une photographie frontale. En 1962, alors que la majorité de ses collègues utilisent tous un appareil 35 millimètres, elle choisit de passer au Rollerflex 6X6, le format carré et le grain apporté par l’appareil révélait selon elle « la véritable texture des choses ». Un changement technique qui va devenir une des caractéristiques spécifiques du style Diane Arbus. Ses photographies, toujours en noir et blanc, exploitent au maximum la lumière, sans pourtant autant céder aux artifices ou aux effets. Elle développait elle-même chacun de ses cliché pour en maitriser le processus du déclencheur jusqu’au tirage. Progressivement, en se distinguant du reportage compris au sens classique du genre et grâce à une technique et un regard singuliers, Diane Arbus fait de la photographie un art a part entière.
more...
No comment yet.