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Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s)
Media Arts Watch Lab - www.arts-numeriques.info - laboratoire de veille Arts Numériques - twitter @arts_numeriques - @processing_org - @DigitalArt_be - by @jacquesurbanska
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Stelarc - Artiste : Mecanique du corps - Le corps obsolète - Arte Tracks (2009)

Stelarc - diminutif de Stelios Arcadiou - est le Merlin l’enchanteur du XXIème siècle. Six jambes, trois bras ou trois oreilles, à 63 ans, ce pionnier du body art fait du lego avec son propre corps.


Implanté en 2007, son cartilage artificiel en forme d'oreille doit être colonisé par ses propres cellules, avant d'accueillir un micro sans-fil relié au Web et de tourner à plein régime. Il a fallu 13 ans à Stelarc pour concrétiser son rêve et convaincre une équipe de chirurgiens de réaliser l'opération.

Stelarc : "C’est de l’architecture anatomique alternative. Je suis fasciné par l'évolution de l'anatomie du corps. Il ne s'agit pas de rendre le corps meilleur. Il n'y pas de désir eugénique. Mais plutôt d'expérimenter et d'explorer une anatomie alternative. Il s'agit de décider soit on accepte le statu quo biologique et évolutif, soit on s'interroge, même si le corps est merveilleusement complexe, même si cela a pris des millions d'années d'évolution, est-ce que le corps ne continue pas à dysfonctionner?"

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One man’s quest to #biohack his body for better #sex

One man’s quest to #biohack his body for better #sex | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

Since the dawn of time—or at the very least, since the early days of Cosmopolitan—we’ve been preoccupied with the question of whether we’re good in bed. There’s no shortage of surgical or pharmaceutical options available to make us harder, better, faster, and stronger. More recently, we’ve even started using sex-tracking apps, so we can record every thrust and whimper between the sheets.


But all of these hacks we employ to improve our sex lives have the disadvantage of being relatively impermanent. No matter how many pills we pop, sex toys we buy, or Tantra workshops we take, there’s no way for us to permanently hack our own bodies to become the sleek, ultra-libidinous pleasure machines some of us so desperately want to be.


Rich Lee, a 32-year-old salesman from St. George, Utah, thinks he’s found the solution to this problem. He calls it the Lovetron9000, and it’s an implant embedded underneath the male pubic bone that causes the penis to vibrate. His goal, he told me during a phone conversation a few weeks ago, is to “turn your boyfriend into a vibrator.”



Via LeapMind, arslog
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Making #BioArt a cultural practice by Verena Dauerer (2010) | The Japan Times

Making #BioArt a cultural practice by Verena Dauerer (2010) | The Japan Times | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

At this year’s Society for Social Studies Conference at the University of Tokyo, Aug. 25-29, there will be a session on “BioArt,” which begs the question: What would that be?


BioArt describes the variety of art forms emerging in the last two decades that use biotechnology or genetics to manipulate living things, altering food, plants, even livestock. In best do-it- yourself tradition, artists have started to swap their studios for laboratories and are using molecular biology to deliberately create hybrids, clones or mutations as artistic expressions. ...

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“Cultivos” by Gilberto Esparza: biology and robotics with a critical vision | VIDA | Fundación Telefónica #mediaart

“Cultivos” by Gilberto Esparza: biology and robotics with a critical vision | VIDA | Fundación Telefónica #mediaart | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

Gilberto Esparza, prizewinner at VIDA 9.0 and VIDA 13.0, is presenting his individual exhibition Cultivos at the Espacio Fundación Telefónica de Lima in Peru. Curated by Tatiana Cuevas, the exhibition brings together three main projects from the artist’s research career: Parásitos urbanos (2006-2008), Plantas nómadas (2008-2013) and Plantas autofotosintéticas (2013-2014). These projects show the intersection between robotics, biology, and special attention to the relationship between nature and urban space, the imbalances between the ecosystem and the action of human beings. In the case of Planas nómadas (Nomad plants), the project can be applied to the city of Lima, whose residual waters are converted to energy to sustain a rudimentary ecosystem made up of protozoa, crustaceans and microalgae which visitors will be able to see at the exhibition. Esparza’s projects, which according to Sally-Jane Norman, co-founder of VIDA, have a “visionary use in their conception and assembly” of available technology, stand out due to the quality of their research and their social and political commitment.

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Sculpted skin furniture by Jessica Harrison - #mediaart #bioart

Sculpted skin furniture by Jessica Harrison - #mediaart #bioart | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it
persuaded by a fascination in human anatomy and bodily functions, UK-based artist jessica harrison sculpts miniature pieces of furniture with materials made from casts of her own skin.
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Invisible Resources - installation by Zuzana Gombosova - #bioart #mediaart

In this project I worked with a group of microorganisms that are capable of producing tangible matter, with the particular focus on exploring the biological material ‘Bacterial Cellulose’. The future potential of this material that can be ‘grown’ rather than ‘manufactured’ has been recognised and developed during the last decade by both scientists and designers alike.

Through this project I aim to explore potential manufacturing processes and applications for this living material, experimenting with different patterns of feeding and nuturing to control growth. My practical research led me to develop a concept for a device capable of controlling the growth of bacterial cellulose, in effect a biological printer. But instead of printing the material, the device feeds it in the area where we d like to stimulate the growth.


Rather than propose a viable new manufacturing process I am keen to pose the following questions: How could such a device alter our current perception and understanding of consumer products? Would the patience required in using growth processes to acquire goods lead to changes in attitudes towards material culture? Could it lead to new ways of material engineering?


By employing technology in order to manipulate organic matter I also aim to question our constant efforts to control nature and it’s unpredictable patterns.

Video by : Sandra Fruebing
MA Textile Futures 2014

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Lia Giraud, celle qui fait de l'art avec du vivant #bioart

Lia Giraud, celle qui fait de l'art avec du vivant #bioart | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it
Née en 1985 à Paris, Lia Giraud est une artiste représentative du bioart, un courant de l'art contemporain formalisé dans les années 2000 et prenant pour médium les ressources offertes par la biotechnologie.


Ma rencontre avec Lia Giraud fut des plus simples et détonnantes. Au détour d'un site Internet, je découvre une partie de son travail. Mes vieilles ambitions scientifiques se mêlent instantanément à ma passion pour l'art. Je la contacte très rapidement et elle me reçoit aussi promptement. Je la découvre dans sa résidence/atelier à Montmartre, à la Cité internationale des arts...

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Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls

Artist Hubert Duprat Collaborates with Caddisfly Larvae as They Build Aquatic Cocoons from Gold and Pearls | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it
Trichoptera (caddis larva) building case (studio view), 1980-2000. Material: Gold, pearls, turquoise. Length: 2.5 cm. Photographer: Frédéric Delpech. Image courtesy of the artist and Art:Concept gallery, Paris and MONA Museum of Old and New Art.

Right now, in almost every river in the world, so
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Artist Diemut Strebe regrows Vincent van Gogh's Ear Using Living Cells And A 3D Printer

Artist Diemut Strebe regrows Vincent van Gogh's Ear Using Living Cells And A 3D Printer | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

Dutch artist Diemut Strebe uses DNA from Impressionist master's distant relative to replicate his severed organ.


It almost feels like people are playing a game of oneupmanship when it comes to 3D printing: You're 3D printing a building? Well, how about 3D printing a building on the moon. Yeah, well, this guy's 3D printing Coney Island's Lunar Park in its entirety. But experimental tech demands experimental and ambitious ideas, right?

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The Body is a Big Place, by Peta Clancy and Helen Pynor - 2011

The Body is a Big Place, by Peta Clancy and Helen Pynor - 2011 | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

New media installation and pig hearts performances
5-channel video projection, heart perfusion device, single video screen, soundscape by Gail Priest
Performance Space, Sydney, Nov 2011

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OpenWorm, the first complete simulation of an entire organism, is coming to your web browser | ExtremeTech

OpenWorm, the first complete simulation of an entire organism, is coming to your web browser | ExtremeTech | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

The most exciting thing happening today in digital biology has got to be the OpenWorm project. Its stated goal is nothing less than to simulate the entire c. elegans organism down to level of each individual cell. Like other crowdsourced initiatives such as the EyeWire brain mapping project, anyone can get involved, and looking at what they have accomplished so far, perhaps everyone should.


The OpenWorm Kickstarter has already raised over $30,000 of its $120,000 goal. What they aim to do is bring their incredibly detailed simulations of the worm to your web browser. As we have detailed before, reducing a kilo-cell dynamic organism interacting with its environment to a stream of 1s and 0s that can be refleshed on the screen in front of you is no easy task. ...


Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
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#Book - Biohackers: The Politics of Open Science by Alessandro Delfanti

#Book - Biohackers: The Politics of Open Science by Alessandro Delfanti | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

Biohackers explores fundamental changes occuring in the circulation and ownership of scientific information. Alessandro Delfanti argues that the combination of the ethos of 20th century science, the hacker movement and the free software movement is producing an open science culture which redefines the relationship between researchers, scientific institutions and commercial companies. ...


Alessandro Delfanti teaches New Media at the University of Milan.

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bcl - artistic research framework - art, biology and design / Shiho Fukuhara & Georg Tremmel

bcl - artistic research framework - art, biology and design / Shiho Fukuhara & Georg Tremmel | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

The BCL is an artistic research framework that aims to explore the relations, congruences and différances of biological and cultural codecs through artistic interventions, social hacking and basic research. BCL is interested in the relationship between art and science in general, and between media art and bio science in particular. The interest is not so much in the new possibilities of artistic expressions, that the emerging biotechnologies make possible, but rather in the social implications that the widespread adoption and application of biotechnology will create. The research of the BCL is speculative and forward-looking, whereas the projects are firmly situated in the present social context and current climate. The projects aim not to be simply answers to real problems, but rather aim to be explorations of the context and systems behind the artistically and socially relevant issues.

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Alternate Anatomies Lab Curtin - interdisciplinary arts initiative led by #Stelarc - #mediaart #bioart

Alternate Anatomies Lab Curtin - interdisciplinary arts initiative led by #Stelarc - #mediaart #bioart | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

The Alternate Anatomies Lab is an interdisciplinary lab that interrogates the aesthetics, the ethics and the engineering of prosthetics, robotics and virtual systems. Its interest encompasses the post-modern condition, post-humanism, identity, embodiment and the evoking of agency in machine systems. Thus it creatively incorporates biomechanics and biomimicry in exploring aliveness with robots. AAL aims to generate concepts of the future that can be contested, critically examined and possibly appropriated.

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OPEN #CALL 2015 | #BioArt & #Design #Awards - The deadline 02-02-2015

OPEN #CALL 2015 | #BioArt & #Design #Awards - The deadline 02-02-2015 | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

Artists and designers interested in the life sciences are invited to propose new projects for funding. The BIO ART & DESIGN AWARD (previously called the DA4GA) grants three awards, each of them is €25.000, to fully realize a new work of art or design that pushes the boundaries of research application and creative expression. Winning proposals are developed in collaboration with a Dutch research institution over several months then exhibited to the public in MU Art Space in Eindhoven at the end of the year. ...

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Life, tissue culture and ethical ambiguities. An interview with Svenja Kratz on we make money not art - #bioart

Life, tissue culture and ethical ambiguities. An interview with Svenja Kratz on we make money not art - #bioart | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

This week (or rather semester since i so seldom do proper interview nowadays), I'm talking with Svenja Kratz , an interdisciplinary artist who combines art practice with cell and tissue cultures to investigate the creative and critical dimensions of biotechnologies as well as their impacts on concepts of identity, life, and death.


Svenja has a background in art but she also holds a PhD in Contemporary Art and Biotechnology from Queensland University of Technology and worked at the Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovationin Brisbane, where she completed a PhD in bio-media art.

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The infofuse – encoding messages using colourful fire

The infofuse – encoding messages using colourful fire | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

For many of us, the most memorable bits of school chemistry classes were lessons where we ignited metal salts over a Bunsen burner to produce brightly coloured flames, from the lilac of potassium to the distinctive red of lithium. Now a group of chemists from Harvard University have found a way of using these colourful flames to transmit coded information.


Working in the lab of legendary chemist George Whitesides, Samuel Thomas III has developed the ‘infofuse’, a strip of flammable paper patterned with metal salts. As the strip burns, the metals change the colour of the flames, creating coded pulses of light that can be used to send messages. It’s a vibrant, visual equivalent of Morse code and as a test-run, they used their infofuses to transmit the message, “LOOK MOM NO ELECTRICITY”....

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The "first man-made biological leaf" could enable humans to colonise space - #innovation

RCA graduate Julian Melchiorri says the synthetic biological leaf he developed, which absorbs water and carbon dioxide to produce oxygen just like a plant, could enable long-distance space travel.


"Plants don't grow in zero gravity," explains Melchiorri. "NASA is researching different ways to produce oxygen for long-distance space journeys to let us live in space. This material could allow us t0 explore space much further than we can now."


Via Xaos, arslog
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New cancer-hunting 'nano-robots' to seek and destroy tumours

New cancer-hunting 'nano-robots' to seek and destroy tumours | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

It sounds like a scene from a science fiction novel – an army of tiny weaponised robots travelling around a human body, hunting down malignant tumours and destroying them from within.


A nanometre is a very small unit of length, just one billionth of a metre. Nanotechnology looks at building up incredibly tiny, nano-level structures for different functions and applications.


One such nanoparticle-based application is the development of precise cancer diagnostic technology and safe, efficient tumour treatment. The only problem is nanoparticles must be tailored to specific jobs. They can be time-consuming and expensive to research and build...

A nanometre is a very small unit of length, just one billionth of a metre. Nanotechnology looks at building up incredibly tiny, nano-level structures for different functions and applications.

One such nanoparticle-based application is the development of precise cancer diagnostic technology and safe, efficient tumour treatment. The only problem is nanoparticles must be tailored to specific jobs. They can be time-consuming and expensive to research and build



Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-08-cancer-hunting-nano-robots-tumours.html#jCp

A nanometre is a very small unit of length, just one billionth of a metre. Nanotechnology looks at building up incredibly tiny, nano-level structures for different functions and applications.

One such nanoparticle-based application is the development of precise cancer diagnostic technology and safe, efficient tumour treatment. The only problem is nanoparticles must be tailored to specific jobs. They can be time-consuming and expensive to research and build.



Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-08-cancer-hunting-nano-robots-tumours.html#jCp

A nanometre is a very small unit of length, just one billionth of a metre. Nanotechnology looks at building up incredibly tiny, nano-level structures for different functions and applications.

One such nanoparticle-based application is the development of precise cancer diagnostic technology and safe, efficient tumour treatment. The only problem is nanoparticles must be tailored to specific jobs. They can be time-consuming and expensive to research and build.



Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-08-cancer-hunting-nano-robots-tumours.html#jCp
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#Book - Meta-Life. Biotechnologies, Synthetic Biology, ALife and the Arts

#Book - Meta-Life. Biotechnologies, Synthetic Biology, ALife and the Arts | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

Publisher Leonardo/Olats writes: Artists have opened new avenues in the art world by employing these developments in biotechnology, synthetic biology and Artificial Life; going from inanimate to autonomous objects to living creatures; exploring the thin border between animate and inanimate; confronting the grown, the evolved, the born and the built; and raising aesthetic but also social, political and ethical issues.


New forms of 'exo-life' may not arrive on Earth from outerspace by hitching a ride on a meteorite, but instead come out of the lab, designed by scientists - or perhaps artists - weaving together biology and computing in a petri dish or bioreactor...

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Jennifer Willet & Jason Knight - Bioteknica - Documentary (part 1)

Jennifer Willet & Jason Knight - Bioteknica - Documentary (part 1) | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

Jason Knight and Jennifer Willet have dedicated themselves to mastering the techniques of tissue engineering. But they are not scientists. They are artists - and their art is raising profound and controversial questions.

Knight and Willet are Canada's leading practitioners of "Bio Art," an emerging form that uses the tools of biology to create works of art. The goal is to draw attention to the field of biotechnology and its impact on society.

On its next edition, VisionTV's Gemini Award-nominated current affairs series 360 Vision takes a close look at the meaning and purpose of Bio Art, and the powerful reactions that it evokes.


part 2 : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hAgGNRmU1po

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Digestive Table - by Amy Youngs

An ecosystem of worms, sowbugs, plants and bacteria live and eat at this table. They are a part of the digestive system that starts with a person discarding food leftovers and shredded paper into the portal at the top. The bacteria and sowbugs begin breaking down the waste and the worms soon join in to further digest it into a rich compost that sprinkles out of the bottom of the fabric bag that hangs beneath the table. This compost is used as a fertilizer for plants, such as those at the base of the table.

The human plays an important part at the table by eating, feeding the food waste to the worms, feeding the resulting fertilizer to the plants, or by simply sitting and appreciating the living ecosystem she/he is a part of. A cross-section of the activity inside the top 9 inches of the compost is made visible using an infrared security camera connected to an LCD screen built into the table. On the screen, viewers can see the live movements of the worms and sowbugs inside.

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Invisible - Erase deletes 99.5% of DNA left behind // by Heather Dewey-Hagborg

Invisible - Erase deletes 99.5% of DNA left behind // by Heather Dewey-Hagborg | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

Erase deletes 99.5% of DNA left behind
Replace obfuscates the remaining .5%


  • Acing that interview? Don’t let your genes undermine your confidence. Be invisible.
  • Are you too big to fail? Don’t let DNA spill your secrets. Protect your image and be invisible.
  • Spend the night somewhere you shouldn't have? Erase your mistake and be invisible.
  • Dinner with the prospective inlaws going smoothly? Don't let them judge you based on your DNA, be invisible.
  • Exercising your freedom of speech? Be invisible and never get tracked.
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The Tissue Culture and Art Project by Oron Catts (talk) - BIO:FICTION Vienna 2011

The Tissue Culture & Art Project (TC&A) was set to explore the use of tissue technologies as a medium for artistic expression. We are investigating our relationships with the different gradients of life through the construction/growth of a new class of object/being - that of the Semi-Living. These are parts of complex organisms which are sustained alive outside of the body and coerced to grow in predetermined shapes. These evocative objects are a tangible example that brings into question deep rooted perceptions of life and identity, concept of self, and the position of the human in regard to other living beings and the environment. We are interested in the new discourses and new ethics/epistemologies that surround issues of partial life and the contestable future scenarios they are offering us.


http://tcaproject.org


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#BioArt - L'art issu des labos | sur ARTE Creative

#BioArt - L'art issu des labos | sur ARTE Creative | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

Qui sont ces artistes contemporains qui brouillent les lignes entre l’art et la science ? Ce documentaire part à la rencontre des figures de la mouvance BioArt : Stelarc, Art Orienté Objet, Paul Vanouse, Joe Davis, Jun Takita ou ORLAN intègrent la biologie dans leurs créations et interrogent la fonction de l’artiste dans notre société.


Ils troquent leur atelier pour un laboratoire, et les matériaux inertes pour des tissus organiques. Dans leurs recherches et leurs créations, les artistes de la mouvance BioArt rendent de plus en plus poreuse la frontière entre sciences naturelles, art et technologie. À l'âge des technosciences, ce créatif mélange des genres permet aux créateurs de s’approprier les techniques de pointe pour les détourner et interroger leur place dans nos vies.

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