Art for Company
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Art for Company
These are contemporary artists that happen to catch my attention during my usual browsing. The selection helps me to develop an informed, context-specific and inspired approach to my own practice as a visual artist.
Curated by Ana Maria Micu
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Marta Riniker-Radich

Marta Riniker-Radich | Art for Company | Scoop.it

Swiss Institute is pleased to present Every home a fortress every hearth a blossom, an exhibition of new works by artist Marta Riniker-Radich (b. 1982, lives and works in Geneva, Switzerland). For her first US solo exhibition, Riniker-Radich focuses on rural anti-government organizations that have flourished in America in recent years. Comprised of drawings, sculptures, and architectural interventions, the exhibition highlights the contradictory desires and fears underpinning such movements. 


Riniker-Radich, who is best known for her luminescent pencil drawings, has here created a new series depicting allegorical environments of care and control. The soft-hued images feature marbled eggs and intricately decorated cupcakes, handcrafted goods associated with rituals of domesticity. These delicate objects are confined within severe architectures designed to isolate and protect. 


To create a sense of privacy, the artist has placed filters on the windows of the gallery and fabricated customized resin earplugs in visceral shades of pink and deep red. The thoughts mold the brain, as certainly as the brain molds the thoughts (2015) are a set of handmade whips, or carpet beaters, suggesting certain obsessive and aggressive aspects of cleanliness. Hinting at a survivalist spirit, rudimentary water filtration systems drip water into buckets throughout the gallery. Meanwhile, a screen displays testimonials, culled from a militia website and message board, of individuals reacting to the supply packages they received in the mail in exchange for their dues. 


Marta Riniker-Radich (b. 1982; Bern, Switzerland) lives and works in Geneva, Switzerland. She received a BFA from Haute Ecole d’Art et de Design, Geneva. Selected solo exhibitions include Aargauer Kunsthaus, Aarau (2016); Scuffling grinding tearing pounding banging slamming, Kunsthaus Langenthal, Langenthal (2013); and Zebedee, New Jerseyy, Basel (2010). Group exhibitions include A Form is a Social Gatherer, Plymouth Rock, Zurich (2015); A Place Like This, Kunsthaus Glarus, Glarus (2014); and Hotel Abisso, Centre d’Art Contemporain, Geneva (2013). She is the recipient of the Manor Kunstpreis Aargau (2016).

 
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Garth Weiser

Garth Weiser | Art for Company | Scoop.it

 

Built up of various layers of paint that are then destroyed and defaced, Lee’s paintings seem almost battle-scarred. When seen as a whole, their uncertain surfaces serve to fool the eye as to their exact composition, with the effect being a sort of post-apocalyptic Op Art. Shadows rise and fall from the uneven surfaces, causing the canvases to shift and alter their appearance depending on how they are approached.

 

http://www.blouinartinfo.com/news/story/1327001/garth-weiser-brings-post-apocalyptic-op-art-to-hong-kongs

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Emmanuelle Lainé

Emmanuelle Lainé | Art for Company | Scoop.it

In her latest exhibition, “Don’t cheat me out of the fullness of my capacity!,” Emmanuelle Lainé pits the aggregation, accumulation, and accrual of making work against its subsequent distribution, dispersal, and distillation. Using the exhibition space as a studio, she corrals objects from her past installations and cheap bric-a-brac into a cognitive and allegorical hall of mirrors.

In the front room of the gallery, a red-clay and gravel pit is the site of construction for a bright-yellow resin sculpture that registers the pressure applied to its clay mold with surrounding objects, such as stacked watering cans, a plush toy horse, a rope, dried flowers, and millet. Digital frames capturing the making of this exhibition are stitched together as a wall mural, achieving a seamless trompe l’oeil of a production process. Standing in a specific place, one completes the tableau by parsing the objects in the image and their doubles in the real installation. The enfilade of these rooms is transformed into a grotto flirting with product and process, or expansion and collapse, enabled as much by the artist’s hand as by the viewer’s observation. Along with the subjectivity implied by the exhibition’s title, its image, objects, and audience alike jostle to generate meanings. We are dispatched into the crosshairs of desire for resolution, ultimately blurred by our own subjectivity.

Jo-ey Tang

Artforum International Magazine

http://www.artforum.com/picks/id=49351

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Silje Figenschou Thoresen

Silje Figenschou Thoresen | Art for Company | Scoop.it

Silje Figenschou Thoresen uses found objects to build her installations on site—pieces of different kinds of wood, paper, plastic. Some objects are close to their origin, like a branch of pine or birch, but moreoften they seem to emanate from a context adjacent to a human dwelling, a backyard or a woodwork shed. Former processes can be discerned; cuttings, marks from sawing, usage—as traces of human activities, they come with a history. Every piece has its history and character, which in these temporary constellations together form precise artistic statements.

 

The material she prefers has an undefined function. They are the kind of sticks and pieces one keep lying around in case of future needs, small and insignificant objects without value which in a specific situation proves to be exactly the thing you need to fill a gap, to support something. Since future needs are unpredictable, alterations are unwise. To cut a stick might mean it´s too short the next time. Flexibility and temporariness open up for a wider range of possible use, so if two pieces needs to be joined together, a rope that later can be untied is to be preferred.

 

Silje Figenschou Thoresen has her background in the Sámi culture of northern Scandinavia. Her work is based in the culture’s pragmatic approach to material and design. A non-hierarchical attitude towards material and the strive for flexibility put established design values into question and form an ideology of recycling and long-term perspectives on the needs and possibilities of everyday life. In contemporary society this also represents a political comment to the increasing consumerism.

 

From the traditional Sámi approach to the design process Silje Figenschou Thoresen also brings a sensitivity to the material and an ability to view the individual object from an unexpected perspective. In her art she transfers a mainly practical understanding into aesthetics and handle other aspects—direction, colour, texture—with the same kind of sensitivity. One can imagine that the aim for balance that permeates her works also once had a practical reason—one can think of hanging storage during nomadic life or even the traditional hanging cradle—and in a wider sense—in relation to the environment. In her installations the straight and entangled, the different materials and colours, the strong and the fragile, history and contemporary life are temporarily in balance, whether hanging like mobiles from the ceiling or resting on the floor in groups of objects, momentarily supporting each other.

Silje Figenschou Thoresen was born 1978 in Kirkenes, Finnmark, Norway. She lives in Kirkenes and Stockholm.

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Richard Tuttle

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Richard Tuttle is one of the most significant artists working today. Since the mid-1960s, he has created an extraordinarily varied body of work that eludes historical or stylistic categorization. Tuttle’s work exists in the space between painting, sculpture, poetry, assemblage, and drawing. He draws beauty out of humble materials, reflecting the fragility of the world in his poetic works. Without a specific reference point, his investigations of line, volume, color, texture, shape, and form are imbued with a sense of spirituality and informed by a deep intellectual curiosity. Language, spatial relationship, and scale are also central concerns for the artist, who maintains an acute awareness for the viewer’s aesthetic experience. Tuttle will be the Artist in Residence at the Getty Research Institute from September 2012–June 2013. The artist lives and works in Mount Desert, Maine; Abiquiu, New Mexico and New York City.

Ana Maria Micu's insight:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EEoZpS4AWLw

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Matthias Bitzer

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Matthias Bitzer’s (born in 1975) works emerge in the play between the media of painting, sculpture, and drawing. The core is the engagement with the formal and thematic contrasts of abstract and figurative representation. Taking a new perspective on classical modernism, the artist combines portraits and geometric constructions and often takes recourse to the formal language, stories, and intellectual historical contexts of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. His works refer often to historical biographies, somewhat outside history, whose displacements and uniqueness he condenses to form a magically-mystically charged visual cosmos. Interested in the relationship between the invisible and the real, he layers symbolic fragments and formal splittings on top of one another like quotes, and divorces them from their original cultural spatial and temporal context. In this reversal of principles of modernism, at issue for Mathias Bitzer is the existential question of the construction of identity.

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Artie Vierkant

Artie Vierkant | Art for Company | Scoop.it

Image Objects
2011 - ongoing
UV prints on dibond, altered documentation images

 

 

Image Objects are a series of works which exist somewhere between physical sculptures and altered documentation images. Each piece begins its life as a digital file, of which countless variations exist. These are then rendered as UV prints on dibond and precision-cut to the form of the piece to create photographic prints with the depth and presence of a sculpture.

Each time the pieces are documented officially (i.e., by the artist or by a gallery), the documentation photos are altered to create a new form which does not accurately represent the physical object, and generate new derivative works that build upon the initial objects. The viewer's experience becomes split between the physical encounter in a gallery setting and the countless variations of the objects circulated in prints, publications, and on the Internet. The documentation becomes a separate work in itself, incorporating elements of collage, techniques commonly used in professional image retouching, aestheticized digital watermarks, and more.

 

http://jstchillin.org/artie/pdf/The_Image_Object_Post-Internet_a4.pdf

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Jacob Hashimoto

Jacob Hashimoto | Art for Company | Scoop.it

The work fills the room like a “diaphanous canopy” evoking in its spectators the sensation of being “surrounded by a mist filled forest of kites and strings - a quiet, meditative, sculptural environment.” The piece synthesizes nature and technology to yield a fluid and organic landscape. This encourages meditation and evokes new readings of the gallery: as a void, as space, or as time.

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Christopher Stevens

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1961 Born in Staines, Middlesex

 

Stevens's work has, for some years now, been concerned with the idea of ‘'everything'. This interest has its origin in the 19th Century plein-air tradition of artists drawing their subject matter from their local surroundings. But today this has become problematic. What now constitutes ‘'local' includes images spanning horizons that stretch from our own interiors to the farthest regions of space. The appearance of reality itself has multiplied to include high-speed and time-lapse, x-ray and infrared, the cinematic, the virtual and the prosthetic. Stevens is haunted by the thought that there may now be more images in the world than there are things that they depict or represent. How can we find meaning in this plethora of visual material, a way through this forest of signs? Instead of offering specific answers to these questions, Stevens is more interested in looking at how we attempt to understand the totality of this landscape. He sees something definingly human in our need to order and make sense of that which is beyond our grasp.

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Hans Op De Beeck

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Visual artist Hans Op de Beeck lives and works in Brussels, where he has developed his career through international exhibitions over the past ten years. His work consists of sculptures, installations, video work, photography, animated films, drawings, paintings and writing (short stories). 

 

Hans Op de Beeck's film 'Staging Silence (2)' is based around abstract, archetypal settings that lingered in the memory of the artist as the common denominator of the many similar public places he has experienced. The video images themselves are both ridiculous and serious, just like the eclectic mix of pictures in our minds. The decision to film in black and white heightens this ambiguity: the theatre like approach of the video invokes the legacy of slapstick, as well as the insidious suspense and latent derailment of film noir. The title refers to the staging of such dormant decors where, in the absence of people, the spectator can project himself as the lone protagonist.

 

Memory images are disproportionate mixtures of concrete information and fantasies, and in this film they materialise before the spectator's eyes through anonymous tinkering and improvising hands. Arms and hands appear and disappear at random, manipulating banal objects, scale representations and artificial lighting into alienating yet recognisable locations. These places are no more or less than animated decors for possible stories, evocative visual propositions to the spectator. Op de Beeck's film is accompanied by a score which, inspired by the images themselves, has been composed by composer-musician Scanner (UK).

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Tatiana Trouvé

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Tatiana Trouvé was born in 1968 in Cosenza (Italy) and lives in Paris today. 

 

In an almost minimalistic manner Trouvé uses simple everyday materials like metal pieces, stones, chairs, glass, soil or water to create surprising constructions that connect memory, history and poetry. Still, her rooms never represent the absent, but draw the visitors into situations loaded with phantasms and imaginaries that seem to elude their definition.

 

Lightness and monumentality, consistency and transience, fiction and everyday situations seem to lose their meaning in Trouvé’s rooms. A strange intertwinement of time and space is also apparent in Trouvé’s large-format drawings that will be on display in the exhibition, too.

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Thomas Zipp

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Thomas Zipp’s exhibition with the title Task Dependence of the Effect of Standards on the Perception of a Series of Objects at the gallery SVIT in Prague narrates to several spheres in our society.

 

In this installation Thomas Zipp thematizes his long-time interest in the research in the area of psychophysics, specifically in the relationship of man to plants. The exhibition transform human (life) cycles to basic elements such as feeding; plants as eatable form, instrument as entertainment. 

 

photo: Thomas Zipp, PLANET CARAVAN, installation view South London Gallery, Courtesy of Alison Jacques Gallery, London and Galerie Guido W. Baudach, Berlin, Photo Andy Keate

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Helene Appel

Helene Appel | Art for Company | Scoop.it

The Approach is pleased to present Helene Appel’s second solo show in London.

 

Appel’s paintings all have a feeling of repetition, a rhythm and labour associated with the domestic realm and not usually connected to painting. The precise beauty of the rendering of the objects contrasts with the ephemeral and everyday nature of the objects themselves. The objects painted– cut onion, grains of rice, a sheet– are part of an everyday vocabulary of informal systematic handling. Processes such as the chopping of onions create a composition we regularly see but rarely pay attention to. In Appel’s work, something so overlooked and now painted with intense attention to detail brings contemplation to the abstraction. Appel is interested in the pictorial quality that these objects intrinsically have; simply by painting them, something happens that takes them away from recognizable representation.

 

Each object is painted to an exact scale representation, held by faint shadows only slightly off the surface of un-primed canvases. 

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Laurent Grasso

Laurent Grasso | Art for Company | Scoop.it
A camera slowly scans the imperious office of the French president in the Élysée palace; a seemingly Flemish painting portrays a group of knights ogling a looming eclipse; a neon hints simultaneously to art history and extra-terrestrial life. These are but glimmers of Laurent Grasso’s complex conceptual practice that delves into science, history, mythology and supernatural phenomena to weave a research-filled narrative bordering the actual and the inconceivable. Oscillating between multiple temporalities as well as geographies, Grasso engages our notions of time and locale, creating work that tests our knowledge in a manner tending on the epistemological.
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Elena del Rivero

Elena del Rivero | Art for Company | Scoop.it

These primed canvases (all entitled “Letter from Home,” with differing subtitles), stretched and then removed from their frames, suggest warmth, intimacy, and domesticity.

Up close, they are noticeably dirty, smudged, and frayed. Dirt is listed as a component of the work along with oil paint. It is in smudges and stains as well as in broad, painted swaths often ending unevenly at the border: the slightly darker, off-white, shadowy tone melds and toys with the actual shadows from the folds on the cloth. With their painted dirt, the unframed “Letters” reach beyond the personal or anecdotal (the morning coffee stain or spill over dinner with friends), as they locate art as dirty, quotidian, and stitched up with everyday life. These are not the clean, impersonal, separate, and pristine objects of the modern art gallery or museum.

http://hyperallergic.com/208463/painted-dirt-and-folded-canvas-elena-del-riveros-letter-from-home/ ;

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Ger van Elk

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Despite the capricious changing of styles, materials and mediums, Van Elk’s oeuvre gravitates around a single intent to investigate the dissemination and administration of Realism in both popular culture and Modernist art history. In his artistic conviction that even a reproduction of reality has a reality of its own, Van Elk turns each encounter with documentary photography into an instant experience by slowing down the act of looking. This is something that the artist has maintained ever since his early career while image production itself has ever since developed into a consumerable virtual commodity.

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Fay Nicolson

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Fay Nicolson is a restless artist, working nomadically across print, photography, sculpture, performance, writing and curating. Nicolson combines a research-based approach alongside a formal and abstract sensibility. Her work relies on an economy of forms that are recursively applied to a range of materials, including clay, paper and fabric. Often, her practice recalls historical antecedents across design, art and radical pedagogy. Ultimately—whether it is giving a lecture, making a sculpture, or curating an exhibition—Nicolson’s work is pervaded by an interest in the possibilities of play. There is a dialectical quality to much of the work—hard against soft, straight lines on draped fabric, smooth alongside rigid. Caryatid Variations (Orange) (2014) is typical, incorporating repeated geometric forms screen-printed onto a long sheet of cotton. The artist’s hand is evident in the printing slippages; the autographic mark is continually processed through reproductive technologies. The fabric is draped over the light fixtures and hangs down in to the space dividing the gallery. Alongside her independent practice, Nicolson also collaborates with Oliver Smith, exploring experimental forms of display and dissemination. Recent projects include the group exhibition “Tokyo in the Fall” (2014) at Gerald Moore Gallery, London. Nicolson will be participating in a number of upcoming exhibitions including “Foam,” a peripatetic project curated by Mat Jenner; “ACCORDION” at Laura Bartlett Gallery, London; and “before breakfast we talked about the furthest visible point before it all disappeared” at Tenderpixel, London. (George Vasey)

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Paul Keir

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My practice can utilise (simultaneously, or separately), a range of formal strategies - painting, objects, floorworks, walldrawing. It begins with the fact of drawing. 

The newest work is always the hardest to adequately ‘explain’: there are often contradictory impulses, seemingly random speculations, which take many months (if ever) to resolve themselves into strands of consistent enquiry.

The following are notes written about the work at various times previously:

‘Registering of presence / repetitive procedure / ‘narratives’ of accumulation and omission / recording passage across a surface or through a space / temporary occupation of, or intervention in a space.’

‘The work values the succinctness of the visual. The ‘visual’ encompasses a sense of weight, a spatial sense, a sense of scale: all the intuitive distinctions and calibrations we make in positioning and adjusting ourselves to the place we are in.’

‘The work is carefully calibrated, but any precision achieved is arrived at intuitively. I have tried to work with an austerity and economy of means.’


Much of this remains valid: additionally in the more recent work there has been an overt concern with lattices, mapping, and transition. 

There remains a concern with the ‘factuality’ of the work, a frankness of means.

PK 2012

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Julia Rommel

Julia Rommel | Art for Company | Scoop.it

The big paintings are hard to control. They always start out too proud and monumental, they want to have a personality but not my personality, and I fight them until we find a compromise. Of course I don’t want these things to have my personality either. I’ve found myself taking elaborate steps to keep my own signature away. Every time I need a mark, I have to build the tool for making that mark: mostly stretcher bars to create a relief, sometimes a pillow of paper towels or just the painting folded back and stapled to itself. I rarely find that my own brushy gesture belongs on a painting. A mark made using the stretcher bars has a natural sense of belonging- at one time the whole painting was contained within its edges. So in layers it flatly and bluntly reveals time and a history of decisions.
Meanwhile, with more slowness to each mark, and more distance between hand and brain, I am a better editor, more apt to cover or chop a thing up, destroy it completely, blame the tool and not myself. It helps, having no attachments until the end. But I still remain perplexed at my constant refusal of my own hand’s gesture, why I find it so excessive- yes it is personal, but the personal is what I am at such pains to bring out of these things, layer after layer. I think about Johns and Ryman and how they get away with making marks that are so signature yet so… at home on the linen. Who was it who answered that Johns was laughing when he made his marks, and that is why I accept them? While I am thinking and frowning when I put a brush in my hand. It was a good answer, but I want more, please bring them. Though I will accept them slowly, and only academically. For I have secretly become very attached to my layers and labor and tool-building.
-JR, January 2014

Ana Maria Micu's insight:

http://www.contemporaryartdaily.com/2013/10/julia-rommel-at-gaudel-de-stampa/

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Annegien Van Doorn

Annegien Van Doorn | Art for Company | Scoop.it

The banal, the quotidian, the obvious, the common and the ordinary fascinate me. How do we give meaning to our daily life? I am looking for the places where we use and transform our surroundings from one day to another. The traces we leave behind with the changes in the space we occupy to give that space the features to attribute to our needs and desires. These interventions speak about who we are and who we want to be in this world.

Whenever I enter a space, I fixate on the objects. Every object has a history. Everything is made by someone and placed somewhere with a certain reason. I’m fascinated by the idea that an object, although made with a clear function, can turn into something else.
I like playing with this idea by re-arranging everyday objects in new settings. Small events are transformed into the monumental and the familiar becomes something extraordinary. By capturing these scenes on a photo or video camera, the objects become unleashed from their original purpose and obtain a new meaning.

 

http://vimeo.com/82611925

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Rinus Van De Velde

Rinus Van De Velde | Art for Company | Scoop.it

Born in 1983, lives and works in Antwerp.

 

''In fact, today’s Romantic hero has become a failed narcissist: his personal freedom to create meaning is sacred, but at the same time continually refuted by stubborn reality.

That reality, therefore, must be mythologized over and over again, it must be transformed into a meaningful story. But how, in a world in which reality falls apart into as many myths as there are other people, does one go about doing that? How does one succeed in creating a stable, meaningful world that is, at the same time, emphatically fictive and subjective? In what sense can an artist these days still be a hero turning the virgin soil of an unknown world? And what then of
the relationship with the viewer who, like the artist himself, must assemble his own story? These are the questions which seem to prompt Rinus Van de Velde in delineating his own personal
mythology.''

 

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Rui Toscano

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Rui Toscano (1970, Lisbon) is an artist who, since the early 90s, has revealed an unusual ability to expand his field of artistic possibilities by recurring to different media in his projects – painting, sculpture, sound, video, installation, drawing – crossing a complex network of references, materials and formal solutions.


In the exhibition “La Grande Avventura dello Spazio”, Toscano returns to the topic visited in his shows “The Great Curve” (2009, Chiado 8, Lisbon) and “Out of a Singularity” (2010, Cristina Guerra Contemporary Art, Lisbon) - where the artist is developing further his research based on space exploration and what is the perception of space in the domains of cosmology, and the artwork “The Right Stuff” stands out as a key piece, being the first in a long string of
work where Toscano explores the visual apparatus that usually surrounds rocket launching.


A recurring approach in the artist’s work, the presence of several media marks this exhibition – drawing, photography, sculpture, painting, and video. Dominated by a play with relationships of scale, the show places the viewer in a thin line between real and imagined in the representation of the Universe as a landscape and the human expectations and impulses.

Ana Maria Micu's insight:

http://vernissage.tv/blog/2008/03/12/rui-toscano-cluster-galeria-distrito-cu4tro-madrid-spain/

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Uwe Wittwer

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Uwe Wittwer (*1954 in Zurich) inquires into and disrupts expectations and viewing habits. The entrancing beauty and sensuousness of his paintings and watercolors lure the viewer into a world of ambiguity.


Only a second glance reveals that the apparent aesthetic innocence of the middle class he portrays is actually a kind of latent horror. Captured in a blur, the still lifes, interiors, landscapes, and portraits avoid obvious interpretation, so that the question of what is “real” and what is “fake,” where the façade or razzle-dazzle begins and ends, remains open.


Fascinated by the imagery of the Old Masters, Wittwer digitally processes the source materials he takes from the Internet and lends them a sense of texture by means of paint, canvas, and paper. His groups of works revolve concentrically around the issue of the reality behind the image.

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Yan Heng

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Born in 1982 in Jinzhou in Liaoning Province, Yan Heng studied within the Oil Painting Department at the Lu Xun Academy of Fine Arts in China. He currently lives and works in Beijing. Inaugurating the artist’s first personal exhibition in the West, “La Botanique du rêve” , Sator Gallery, in Paris, presents different series of works with oil on canvas to which he combines three dimensional objects and incorporates into installations.

 

The paintings of Yan Heng are figurative and narrative, products of his own experiences as well as the collective metaphors of contemporary Chinese society. His representations of the body and his introspective approach are illustrative of a new pictorial tendency within Chinese art. The work of Yan Heng derives its sources from daily life. He takes lived reality as his starting point, transforming it and pushing it toward a surreality which evades direct readings. Incorporating into his work objects of fantasy and appropriation, he takes ideological and social emblems from China during the second half of the 20th century (a car reserved for political dignitaries, a sculpture of Lenin) and merges them with symbols and icons of the new consumer society (a washing machine, a computer key- board and monitor, an image of Michael Jackson).

 http://horstundedeltraut.com/2012/08/la-botanique-du-reve/

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Matthew Brannon

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David Kordansky Gallery is very pleased to announce Leopard, an exhibition of new work by Matthew Brannon.

 

Leopard offers a radical reimagining of the role played by text and literary narrative in visual art. Though language and associated cultural signifiers––graphic, in both senses of the word––have long been central to Brannon’s work, this exhibition puts linguistic syntax at the literal center of the equation, like genitalia. The core of the exhibition is an erotic novella, written by Brannon, entitled “Leopard.” However, the novella itself, in physical form, is buried in the show and cannot be directly accessed.

The text of the book will only be present in the form of a video work on two monitors installed in the center of the gallery. Surrounding the monitors is a suite of paintings whose primary role is containment, their role as visual documents in some way secondary to their role as vessels for language. To this end, a slot has been cut into the side of each painting; inserted in the slot is a book, one copy of an edition of “Leopard” limited to the number of paintings in the show. 


 

Matthew Brannon (b. 1971) has been the subject of numerous one-person exhibitions, including Department Store at Night (Five Impossible Films, I), Marino Marini Museum, Florence, Italy; A question answered with a quote, Portikus, Frankfurt, Germany; Mouse Trap, Light Switch, Museum M, Leuven, Belgium; Where We Were, Whitney Museum of American Art at Altria, New York; and Try and Be Grateful, Art Gallery of York University, Toronto. 

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