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Artificial life
Break-throughs and new directions in the creation of artificial life
Curated by Bronwen Evans
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Positive Futurist - Artificial lifeforms promise cleaner world, healthier humans

Positive Futurist - Artificial lifeforms promise cleaner world, healthier humans | Artificial life | Scoop.it
PositiveFuturist.com - Cutting-edge news and information covering science, technology and the evolving world.
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United States is considering creating "mutant soldiers"

United States is considering creating "mutant soldiers" | Artificial life | Scoop.it
According to a report by three researchers at the California State Polytechnic University, the agencies involved in these projects evaluated using drugs, prosthetics, gene manipulation and other techniques on their soldiers.
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Beyond texting: augmented-reality windshields — what could go wrong? | KurzweilAI

Beyond texting: augmented-reality windshields — what could go wrong? | KurzweilAI | Artificial life | Scoop.it
What? You thought distracted drivers texting on cell phones and swerving erratically is a problem? That's so 2011. Imagine a future in which icons flash (Beyond texting: augmented-reality windshields — what could go wrong?

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Anders Sandberg on Singularity 1 on 1: We Are All Amazingly Stupid, But We Can Get Better

Anders Sandberg on Singularity 1 on 1: We Are All Amazingly Stupid, But We Can Get Better | Artificial life | Scoop.it

Dr. Anders Sandberg is a well known transhumanist, futurist, computational neuroscientist and currently a research fellow at the Future of Humanity Institute in Oxford University. I have been thinking of inviting him on Singularity 1 on 1 for some time and when one of my readers actually asked me to do it I could not be happier to oblige. Includes Audio.


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Cognitive Democracy — Crooked Timber

Networks, media, collective action, public sphere, markets, hierarchies, politics, decision-making -- Howard 

 

"In this essay, we outline a cognitive approach to democracy. Specifically, we argue that democracy has unique benefits as a form of collective problem solving in that it potentially allows people with highly diverse perspectives to come together in order collectively to solve problems. Democracy can do this better than either markets and hierarchies, because it brings these diverse perceptions into direct contact with each other, allowing forms of learning that are unlikely either through the price mechanism of markets or the hierarchical arrangements of bureaucracy. Furthermore, democracy can, by experimenting, take advantage of novel forms of collective cognition that are facilitated by new media."


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Poor Richard's comment, May 26, 2012 3:44 AM
How do we prep citizens for cognitive democracy? How about some cognitive hygiene? http://almanac2010.wordpress.com/2012/05/26/xtopia/
Poor Richard's comment, May 26, 2012 3:45 AM
How do we prep citizens for cognitive democracy? How about some cognitive hygiene? http://almanac2010.wordpress.com/2012/05/26/xtopia/
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Drone-Ethics Briefing: What a Leading Robot Expert Told the CIA

Drone-Ethics Briefing: What a Leading Robot Expert Told the CIA | Artificial life | Scoop.it
We hear a lot about the ethics of military robots, but little about the ethics of using machines for surveillance and reconnaissance...
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Diffbot Is New Geeky Technology That Processes The Content On The Web The Way A Human Being Can | TechCrunch

Diffbot Is New Geeky Technology That Processes The Content On The Web The Way A Human Being Can | TechCrunch | Artificial life | Scoop.it

Diffbot is a geeky and incredibly interesting technology that uses bots, algorithms, computer vision and artificial intelligence to process the content on the Web the way a human being can. “The entire Internet can be broken down into 30 different page types” explains Co-founder Mike Tung, also known as “Diffbot Mike,” and “Diffbot can identify them all.” Diffbot knows the difference between a social network profile, a blog post, a site’s front page, a product page, an event page and dozens more.

 

[read full article http://j.mp/oNsUiH]


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Scientists, students explore hidden aspects of science - Times of India

Scientists, students explore hidden aspects of science - Times of India | Artificial life | Scoop.it
Scientists, students explore hidden aspects of scienceTimes of IndiaHe expressed confidence that the genes and genomics are the only solution for the enhancement of the productivity in India to cover the demand.
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"Scientists" Create Artificial Life in Laboratory - The First living thing ever created by human

"Scientists" Create Artificial Life in Laboratory - The First living thing ever created by human | Artificial life | Scoop.it
Scientists in the US have succeeded in developing the first living cell to be controlled entirely by synthetic DNA.




The researchers constructed a bacterium's "genetic software" and transplanted it into a host cell.
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Prof. Owen Holland (University of Sussex) presents The robot with a human skeleton

Prof. Owen Holland (University of Sussex) presents The robot with a human skeleton | Artificial life | Scoop.it
Mathematician Marcus du Sautoy has been to meet the first robot to mimic in anatomical detail the movements of the human body.

 

The anthropomimetic robot, which has joints, bones, muscles and tendons will, according to Professor Owen Holland from the University of Sussex, bring us closer to true artificial intelligence.

 

English professor Owen Holland has created the world’s first robot that mimics human form. While the robot does not have skin or blood, it does have joints, bones, muscles, and tendons that “move exactly like ours” allowing it to “have humanlike interactions with the world,” reported BBC News on Monday.

 

Holland, working out of the University of Sussex, believes that his creation will bring us one step closer to true artificial intelligence.

 

Holland says our physical form helps shape the way we think and that without a body, artificial intelligence could not exist. “What we’re interested in is how the brain controls the body,” Holland said.

The robot, which resembles a cross between a science classroom skeleton and something from Frankenstein’s laboratory, has the ability to react to and interact with humans, including gently squeezing someone’s hand when giving a handshake.

 

“It does give people the sensation of interacting with something that in a way is really like themselves,” Holland said.


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How Immersion Helps to Learn a New Language

How Immersion Helps to Learn a New Language | Artificial life | Scoop.it
Learning a foreign language is never easy, but contrary to common wisdom, it is possible for adults to process a language the same way a native speaker does. And over time, the processing improves even when the skill goes unused, researchers are reporting.

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Sharrock's curator insight, January 22, 2013 3:43 PM

How to learn a new language using immersion. 

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Geneticist Runs Personalized Medicine Superstudy On Himself

Geneticist Runs Personalized Medicine Superstudy On Himself | Artificial life | Scoop.it
By Jon Cohen, ScienceNOWMichael Snyder has taken (Geneticist does personalized medicine study on self.)...
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Bio Printer: Print Your Organs in 3D

Follow us at: http://www.trendguardian.com/ What if organs can be printed? With the advances in bioengineering this might be possible. A new tissue engineeri...
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Genetic Modification Gone Wild: 10 Signs That Our World May Be Destined To Resemble A Really Bad Science Fiction Movie

Genetic Modification Gone Wild: 10 Signs That Our World May Be Destined To Resemble A Really Bad Science Fiction Movie | Artificial life | Scoop.it
Did you know that today scientists are actually producing mice that tweet like birds, cats that glow in the dark, monster salmon, spider goats, cow/human
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Researchers build a toolbox for synthetic biology - Phys.Org

Researchers build a toolbox for synthetic biology - Phys.Org | Artificial life | Scoop.it
Researchers build a toolbox for synthetic biologyPhys.OrgGraphic: Christine Daniloff/iMol.
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Brain-computer interfaces creep closer to bionic, mecha dream

Brain-computer interfaces creep closer to bionic, mecha dream | Artificial life | Scoop.it

A crack team of neuroscientist engineers from the University of Minnesota have created the first brain-computer interface (BCI) that allows the human user to navigate a 3D space.


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Algorithms Take Control of Wall Street

Algorithms Take Control of Wall Street | Artificial life | Scoop.it

Last spring, Dow Jones launched a new service called Lexicon, which sends real-time financial news to professional investors. This in itself is not surprising. The company behind The Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones Newswires made its name by publishing the kind of news that moves the stock market. But many of the professional investors subscribing to Lexicon aren’t human—they’re algorithms, the lines of code that govern an increasing amount of global trading activity—and they don’t read news the way humans do. They don’t need their information delivered in the form of a story or even in sentences. They just want data—the hard, actionable information that those words represent.

Lexicon packages the news in a way that its robo-clients can understand. It scans every Dow Jones story in real time, looking for textual clues that might indicate how investors should feel about a stock. It then sends that information in machine-readable form to its algorithmic subscribers, which can parse it further, using the resulting data to inform their own investing decisions. Lexicon has helped automate the process of reading the news, drawing insight from it, and using that information to buy or sell a stock. The machines aren’t there just to crunch numbers anymore; they’re now making the decisions.


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Electronic life

Electronic life | Artificial life | Scoop.it

A crowdfunding campaign I'm running to look for digital lifeforms inside flash drives. The properties of NAND flash chips can allow certain bit sequences to trick the system into making copies of them. I'm trying to find them.

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AI uprising: humans will be outsourced, not obliterated

AI uprising: humans will be outsourced, not obliterated | Artificial life | Scoop.it

Forget about The Terminator, the real problem with AI (artificial intelligence) is what to do when it meets your boss or even your friends.

 

This is not the pitch for some kind of sci-fi rom-com, but rather the genuine concern of Dr Stuart Armstrong, a research fellow at Oxford University's Future of Humanity Institute. His job is to think about future threats to the human race and how to confront them.

 

AI is in the top five threats to humanity that he lists quickly on the back of his napkin, set against the rather incongruous background of the student chit-chat that fills Oxford's cycling cafe, Zappi's (for the record, the other four are: pandemics, synthetic biology, nanotechnology and nuclear war).


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Barry Schuler: Genomics 101 | Video on TED.com

TED Talks What is genomics? How will it affect our lives? In this intriguing primer on the genomics revolution, entrepreneur Barry Schuler says we can at least expect healthier, tastier food.
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Free Open Course: HST.510 Genomics, Computing, Economics, and Society (MIT)

Free Open Course: HST.510 Genomics, Computing, Economics, and Society (MIT) | Artificial life | Scoop.it
Free Open Course: HST.510 Genomics, Computing, Economics, and Society (MIT) (Free Online course: HST.510 Genomics, Computing, Economics, and Society (MIT) from Massachusetts Ins...)...
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Memory Foraging: When the Brain Behaves Like a Bee

Researchers test the idea that we hunt for memories in our minds the same way some animals search for food...

 

In search of nectar, a honeybee flies into a well-manicured suburban garden and lands on one of several camellia bushes planted in a row. After rummaging through the ruffled pink petals of several flowers, the bee leaves the first bush for another. Finding hardly any nectar in the flowers of the second bush, the bee flies to a third. And so on.

 

Our brains may have evolved to forage for some kinds of memories in the same way, shifting our attention from one cluster of stored information to another depending on what each patch has to offer.

 

Recently, Thomas Hills of the University of Warwick in England and his colleagues found experimental evidence for this potential parallel. "Memory foraging" is only one way of thinking about memory—and it does not apply universally to all types of information retained in the brain—but, so far, the analogy seems to work well for particular cases of active remembering.


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Computer scientist leads the way to the next revolution in artificial intelligence

Computer scientist leads the way to the next revolution in artificial intelligence | Artificial life | Scoop.it
As computer scientists this year celebrate the 100th anniversary of the birth of the mathematical genius Alan Turing, who set out the basis for digital computing in the 1930s to anticipate the electronic age, they still quest after a machine as adaptable and intelligent as the human brain.

 

Now, computer scientist Hava Siegelmann of the University of Massachusetts Amherst, an expert in neural networks, has taken Turing's work to its next logical step. She is translating her 1993 discovery of what she has dubbed "Super-Turing" computation into an adaptable computational system that learns and evolves, using input from the environment in a way much more like our brains do than classic Turing-type computers. She and her post-doctoral research colleague Jeremie Cabessa report on the advance in the current issue of Neural Computation.


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World-class innovation: A conversation with a leader in the race to acheive the $1000 genome | SmartPlanet

World-class innovation: A conversation with a leader in the race to acheive the $1000 genome | SmartPlanet | Artificial life | Scoop.it
Smart Planet has a conversation with the CEO of Complete Genomics, Cliff Reid, a leader in the pursuit for low-cost human genome sequencing. A technol (World-class innovation: A conversation with a leader in the race to acheive ...
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TREND GUARDIAN: The Most Inspiring and Innovative Videos: Bioinformatics: The Age of Web Genomics

TREND GUARDIAN: The Most Inspiring and Innovative Videos: Bioinformatics: The Age of Web Genomics | Artificial life | Scoop.it
Follow the most inspiring and innovative tech videos and how entrepreneurs are changing the world by shaping business, science, education, gaming, the internet, the environment, and medicine.
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