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Rescooped by Namrata from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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The man who grows fields full of tables and chairs - BBC News

The man who grows fields full of tables and chairs - BBC News | Articles that interest me | Scoop.it
It takes Gavin Munro six years to grow a full crop of willow furniture on his Derbyshire furniture farm.

Via Mary Williams
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The Science Behind Coffee and Why it's Actually Good for Your Health

The Science Behind Coffee and Why it's Actually Good for Your Health | Articles that interest me | Scoop.it
Coffee isn't just warm and energizing, it may also be extremely good for you. In recent years, scientists have studied the effects of coffee on various aspects of health and their results have been nothing short of amazing.
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The Archaeobotanist: Weed evolution by de-domestication: the case of rice

The Archaeobotanist: Weed evolution by de-domestication: the case of rice | Articles that interest me | Scoop.it

The study of weed origins and evolutionary history is the poor cousin of the archaeobotany of crop domestication. Archaeobotanists can potentially do much more on this, and undoubtedly should. To provide some inspiration it is worth considering some recent insights from genetics, to do with weedy rice. While it is surely the case that rice's wild progenitors may act as weeds in the crop, it now appears that much weedy rice is descended from the crop and not directly from the wild progenitor.


Via Dorian Q Fuller, Eve Emshwiller, Jean-Pierre Zryd, Luigi Guarino
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Why communicate science? | Climate Etc.

by Judith Curry Don't think you need to teach the public a lot of science facts. Instead, show what science is, what it means, why we need it. Find a way to have a presence.
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Full Extent of Africa’s Groundwater Resources Visualized for the First Time | New Security Beat

Full Extent of Africa’s Groundwater Resources Visualized for the First Time | New Security Beat | Articles that interest me | Scoop.it
the Blog of the Environmental Change and Security Program...
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Rescooped by Namrata from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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With Google’s Support, Plant Biologists Build First Online Database Of All The World’s Plant Species

With Google’s Support, Plant Biologists Build First Online Database Of All The World’s Plant Species | Articles that interest me | Scoop.it
Four leading botanical gardens from around the world want to make it easier for researchers to identify plants in the field.

Via Mary Williams
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Rescooped by Namrata from Rice origins and cultural history
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8000-Year old rice remains from the north edge of the Shandong Highlands, East China

8000-Year old rice remains from the north edge of the Shandong Highlands, East China | Articles that interest me | Scoop.it

Systematic archaeobotanical work at Xihe site recovered 8000 years old rice and other plant remains. Cultural context analyses of the plant and animal remains indicated Xihe people relied mainly on fishing–hunting–gathering as their subsistence. As the largest amount and higher concentration of plant remains, rice might contribute much to plant food resource at the settlement. Even though it is too early to demonstrate the nature of the rice remains (whether it is wild, cultivated or domesticated), the case that discovery of Xihe rice has undoubtedly provided new evidence for our understanding of rice exploitation subsistence at about 8000 years ago in East China.


Via Dorian Q Fuller
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Dorian Q Fuller's curator insight, February 25, 2013 9:13 AM

Importany evidence for early rice and millet consumption in northern Shandong: 74 fragments of rice grains and 2 "Setaria italica" This looks to be morpholoigically wild and would fit with our expectation that wild rice used to range this far north. The authors argue that this rice was had "special" status because of its concetration in a particular pit, but given that this pit had higher density of most categories of plant remains and animals remains (especially fish bones), what seems to be special is the preservation conditions of the pitfill rather than contents of the pit. Beyond this special status context, the authors argue that the chronologicl context should be taken to indicate cultivation because of similar age sites like Jiahu and Baligang also have rice that may be cultivated (or maybe not?)-- this all makes for a rather tenuous argument for inferring cultivation.  Given the fragmentary nature of the 2 foxtail millet grains even the cultivation of these could be questioned. Still an exciting early archaeobotanical assemblage, although looks to be more in the hunter-gather grade than early farming.

jasmin's comment, February 27, 2013 7:33 AM
Rice is the important component in south Indian dishes. http://www.vaango.in/
Rescooped by Namrata from Geography Education
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Where Does Your Water Come From?

Where Does Your Water Come From? | Articles that interest me | Scoop.it

This interactive map documents where 443 million people around the world get there water (although the United States data is by far the most extensive).  Most people can't answer this question.  A recent poll by The Nature Conservancy discoverd that 77% of Americans (not on private well water) don't know where their water comes from, they just drink it.  This link has videos, infographics and suggestions to promote cleaner water.  This is also a fabulous example of an embedded map using ArcGIS Online to share geospatial data with a wider audience.  

 

Tags: GIS, water, fluvial, environment, ESRI, pollution, development, consumption, resources, mapping, environment depend, cartography, geospatial. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Nic Hardisty's comment, October 15, 2012 9:01 AM
I was definitely unaware of where my drinking water came from. This is nice, user-friendly map... Hopefully it gets updated regularly, as it will be interesting to see how these sources change over time.
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, July 1, 2013 3:55 PM

water is a resource we all depend on. Some of my best studies were on local Chesapeake Bay issues.

Rescooped by Namrata from Geography Education
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Remote Sensing and Land Cover Change

Remote Sensing and Land Cover Change | Articles that interest me | Scoop.it

By moving the slider, the user can compare 1990 false-color Landsat views (left) with recent true-color imagery (right). Humans are increasingly transforming Earth’s surface—through direct activities such as farming, mining, and building, and indirectly by altering its climate.


This interactive feature includes 12 places that have experienced significant change since 1990.  This is an user-friendly way to compare remote sensing images over time.  Pictured above is the Aral Sea, which is and under-the-radar environmental catastrophe in Central Asia that has its roots in the Soviet era's (mis)management policies.  

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, esri, unit 1 Geoprinciples, zbestofzbest.


Via Seth Dixon
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Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 2014 2:24 PM

Looking at the images above it is understandable that the disappearance of the Aral Sea is known as the greatest environmental disaster (that we are not talking about). The amount of change that has taken place in this area is incomprehensible for the amount of time it has taken. Humans so often do not consider their actions on this planet , I believe what has taken place here is an utter shame.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 2:25 PM

Clearly the water level has decreased in Kazakhstan from 1990 until now. Farming, mining, and building are all indirectly changing the geography of some places. The use of rivers for cotton irrigation has shrunk by 3 quarters in the last 50 years and it is extremely affecting the Aral Sea. 

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2014 3:10 PM

Is sad to see how humans are changing the environment forcing the wild creatures to abandon the places they've been living for hundred or years or die of starvation. I wonder what will happen in 300 years when there is no more big lakes and the oceans will be completed polluted .

Rescooped by Namrata from Rice origins and cultural history
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Population structure of the primary gene pool of Oryza sativa in Thailand

Population structure of the primary gene pool of Oryza sativa in Thailand | Articles that interest me | Scoop.it

Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution, Online First™ - SpringerLink.

The gene pool of cultivated Asian rice consists of wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.), cultivated rice (O. sativa L.) and a weedy form (O. sativa f. spontanea). All three components are widespread in Thailand, frequently co-occurring within fields and providing the opportunity for gene flow and introgression. The purpose to this study is to understand the on-going evolutionary processes that affect the gene pool of rice by analysis of microsatellite variation. Results indicate that O. rufipogon, the wild ancestor of rice, has high levels of genetic variation both within and among populations. Moreover, the variation is structured predominantly by annual and perennial life history. High levels of variation are detected among cultivars indicating Thai cultivated rice has a broad genetic base with only a 20 % reduction in diversity from its wild ancestor. The weedy rice populations reveal varying levels of genetic variation, from nearly as high as wild rice to near zero. Weedy rice is genetically structured into 2 groups. Some populations of invasive weedy rice are the result of hybridization and gene flow between local wild rice and local cultivated rice in the regions of co-occurrence. Other populations of weedy rice are genetically nearly identical to the local cultivated rice. The diversity analysis indicates that the rice gene pool in Thailand is a dynamic genetic system. Gene flow is ongoing among its three main components, first between cultivated and wild rice resulting in weedy rice. Weedy rice in turn crosses with both cultivated varieties and wild rice.


Via Dorian Q Fuller
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