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Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from Plant & Evolution
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Rare earth elements activate endocytosis in plant cells

Abstract

It has long been observed that rare earth elements (REEs) regulate multiple facets of plant growth and development. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unclear. Here, using electron microscopic autoradiography, we show the life cycle of a light REE (lanthanum) and a heavy REE (terbium) in horseradish leaf cells. Our data indicate that REEs were first anchored on the plasma membrane in the form of nanoscale particles, and then entered the cells by endocytosis. Consistently, REEs activated endocytosis in plant cells, which may be the cellular basis of REE actions in plants. Moreover, we discovered that a portion of REEs was successively released into the cytoplasm, self-assembled to form nanoscale clusters, and finally deposited in horseradish leaf cells. Taken together, our data reveal the life cycle of REEs and their cellular behaviors in plant cells, which shed light on the cellular mechanisms of REE actions in living organisms.


Via Pierre-Marc Delaux
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Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from Amazing Science
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Invertebrate numbers nearly halve as human population doubles

Invertebrate numbers nearly halve as human population doubles | Articles for students to read. | Scoop.it

Invertebrate numbers have decreased by 45% on average over a 35 year period in which the human population doubled, reports a study on the impact of humans on declining animal numbers.


This decline matters because of the enormous benefits invertebrates such as insects, spiders, crustaceans, slugs and worms bring to our day-to-day lives, including pollination and pest control for crops, decomposition for nutrient cycling, water filtration and human health.


The study, published in Science and led by UCL, Stanford and UCSB, focused on the demise of invertebrates in particular, as large vertebrates have been extensively studied. They found similar widespread changes in both, with an on-going decline in invertebrates surprising scientists, as they had previously been viewed as nature’s survivors.


The decrease in invertebrate numbers is due to two main factors – habitat loss and climate disruption on a global scale. In the UK alone, scientists noted the areas inhabited by common insects such as beetles, butterflies, bees and wasps saw a 30-60% decline over the last 40 years.


Scientists believe there is a growing understanding of how ecosystems are changing but to tackle these issues, better predictions of the impact of changes are needed together with effective policies to reverse the losses currently seen. Using this approach, conservation of species can be prioritized with the benefit of protecting processes that serve human needs, and successful campaigns scaled-up to effect a positive change globally.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from What I Wish I Had Known
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8 Surprising Ways Music Affects and Benefits our Brains - - The Buffer Blog

8 Surprising Ways Music Affects and Benefits our Brains - - The Buffer Blog | Articles for students to read. | Scoop.it
I’m a big fan of music, and use it a lot when working, but I had no idea about how it really affects our brains and bodies.

Via Anita
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Anita's curator insight, November 21, 2013 10:53 AM

So many benefits. Listen up!

The BioSync Team's curator insight, November 22, 2013 11:17 AM


Without music, life would be a mistake.

—Friedrich Nietzsche


Read more ...

Audrey's curator insight, November 22, 2013 5:23 PM

Happy/sad music affects how we see neutral faces

moderate noise level is great for creativity.

Different genres correspond to personalities, e.g.

Blues fans have high self-esteem, are creative, outgoing, gentle and at easeJazz fans have high self-esteem, are creative, outgoing and at easeClassical music fans have high self-esteem, are creative, introvert and at easeRap fans have high self-esteem and are outgoing

 

Curated by Audrey Foster for http://www.homeschoolsource.co.uk.

 

Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from Engagement Based Teaching and Learning
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Connection Between CCSS and Student Motivation

Connection Between CCSS  and Student Motivation | Articles for students to read. | Scoop.it

I believe that a tell-tale sign of a change initiative that has merit is one that quickly takes teacher conversation to the student motivation question.

 

Love this post.  Motivation, engagement and education are topics I am passionate about.  To impact our learners, we must understand what motivates them.  This understanding will certainly change how we do what we do in our classrooms.  


Via Darren Burris, Mary Perfitt-Nelson
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Mary Perfitt-Nelson's comment, December 1, 2012 10:16 PM
Great share! Thank you!
Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from Vertical Farm - Food Factory
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Wireless technology set to change the face of food safety monitoring | The Chefs Forum

Wireless technology set to change the face of food safety monitoring | The Chefs Forum | Articles for students to read. | Scoop.it
Wireless technology set to change the face of food safety monitoring http://t.co/no7pnzIXM8

Via Alan Yoshioka
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Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from Nutrition, Food Safety and Food Preservation
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Eat Fresh Produce, But Handle It Safely

Eat Fresh Produce, But Handle It Safely | Articles for students to read. | Scoop.it

Via Ron Wolford
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Ron Wolford's curator insight, August 3, 2013 2:13 PM

Iowa State University Extension and Outreach

Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from healthcare technology
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Medical devices that become obsolete against a smartphone

Medical devices that become obsolete against a smartphone | Articles for students to read. | Scoop.it

We have already looked at how a mobile phone can be used as a tool for helping and monitoring people with certain medical conditions (like for example diabetes patients or people with reduced eyesight), but more and more apps and accessories are appearing in the mHealth field, which make use of the features of smartphones in order to replace other traditional medical devices.

 

The advantage of this type of services and tools is obvious: a considerable cost reduction for medical devices, which not only allows anybody to obtain such devices to monitor a patient at home, but it also makes it less difficult to provide them in developing countries, regions in crisis or areas, where the closest hospital may be hundreds of kilometers away.

Example 1 : SpiroSmart, your Phone turned into a Spirometer

A spirometry may be one of the tests most frequently done on asthma patients and others suffering from breathing problems, fundamentally measuring lung capacity and volume. Although portable spirometers do exist, wouldn’t it be great to be able to take these measures wherever you are with your mobile phone?

 

This is exactly what a group of researchers from Washington University enables you to do with SpiroSmart, an application which - without any additional accessories - allows you to use your smartphone in place of a spirometer. It works in a very simple way: All you need to do, is blow towards the telephone allowing it to analyze the sound frequency. The application uses the user’s windpipe and voice chords to replace the tubes in traditional spirometers.

 

Example 2: MobiUS, Pocket size Ultrasound Scanner

Numerous medical examinations are based on ultrasound scans, that create two- or three-dimensional images of what is going on inside our body (like the womb of a pregnant woman, to give you a very common example). How is it possible to realize these kinds of exams without carrying a big and heavy piece of machinery? Pocket Scanners are one possible option, but they are quite pricy. MobiUS is another possibility.

 

MobiUS, has already received approval from the american FDA to be sold on the mHEalth market. It is a accessory which you can connect to a smartphone or tablet computer and slide it over the part of the patient’s body to be analyzed. The images obtained by the ultrasound accessory appear on our smartphone screen and may be stored or shared immediately with other doctors. And the accessory works with batteries, which makes it possible to use it in areas where no electrical grid is available.

  
Via nrip
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Richard Platt's curator insight, January 18, 2014 12:14 PM

Saw this coming, how about you?

Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from FOOD? HEALTH? DISEASE? NATURAL CURES???
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The Medicalization of Childbirth

The Medicalization of Childbirth | Articles for students to read. | Scoop.it
Our overzealous medical community has taken the blessed event of childbirth and turned it into a medical procedure with a whole different set of risks and side effects.

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
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Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from Amazing Science
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A diverse range of life forms exists deep underground, but they survive at an incredibly slow pace

A diverse range of life forms exists deep underground, but they survive at an incredibly slow pace | Articles for students to read. | Scoop.it

Long-lived bacteria, reproducing only once every 10,000 years, have been found in rocks 2.5km (1.5 miles) below the ocean floor that are as much as 100 million years old. Viruses and fungi have also been found. The discoveries raise questions about how life persists in such extreme conditions.

 

Scientists from the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program have announced the findings at the Goldschmidt conference, a meeting of more than 4,000 geochemists, in Florence, Italy. Fumio Inagaki of the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, reported that the microbes exist in very low concentrations, of around 1,000 microbes in every tea spoon full of rock, compared with billions or trillions of bacteria that would typically be found in the same amount of soil at Earth's surface.

 

Alongside the simple single-celled organisms (prokaryotes) found in the deep rocks, Tom Englehardt of the University of Oldenburg, Germany, showed that viruses are even more abundant, outnumbering microbes by more than 10 to one, with that ratio increasing with depth.

 

Dr Englehardt said of these viruses: "They are quite stable in these sediments, especially as the metabolic rates of the cells are so low, and they exist in sediments up to 100 million years old." The number of microbes was so low that the distances between them were much greater than those of communities at Earth's surface, so the scientists were surprised to find that they could support a virus' life cycle.

 

Dr Orcutt continued: "One of the biggest mysteries of life below the sea floor is that although there are microbes down there it's really hard to understand how they have enough energy to live and how incredibly slowly they are growing.

 

"The deeper we look, the deeper we are still finding cells, and the discussion now is where is the limit? Is it going to be depth, is it going to be temperature? Where is the limit from there being life to there being no life?" 

 

The long-lived bacteria metabolise at such a slow rate that some even question whether this constitutes life at all. "The other question we have is that even though we are finding cells, is it really true to call it alive when it's doubling every thousands of years? It's almost like a zombie state," Dr Orcutt commented.

 

Despite being very slow-living and slow-acting, Earth scientists have also suggested that the existence of microbial communities deep in Earth's rocks could be changing the chemistry of the rocks, the deeper Earth, and the planet itself.

 

By locking up and using carbon within the rocks, these deep organisms could be modifying the carbon cycle on Earth, and could ultimately have some impact on the rates of release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere from volcanoes over Earth's history.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Scooped by Lauren Malecha
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Breast feeding vs bottle feeding, the on going battle. - Kids Product Directory

Breast feeding vs bottle feeding, the on going battle. - Kids Product Directory | Articles for students to read. | Scoop.it
Colostrum which is released during breast feeding is highly beneficial for newborns. It contains cells and antibodies that are necessary for the development of our immune systems.
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Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from Pregnancy, Birth and Early Childhood News
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Breastfeeding duration helped by formula

Breastfeeding duration helped by formula | Articles for students to read. | Scoop.it
SMALL amounts of formula for infants experiencing high levels of early weight loss can increase the length of time their mothers breastfeed, research suggests.

Via David Holloway
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Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from Pregnancy, Birth and Early Childhood News
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Breast milk protects mothers and babies from infection

Breastfeeding may be an ancient practice but we are learning new things about it all the time.

Via David Holloway
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Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from Pregnancy, Birth and Early Childhood News
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Obese Moms More Likely to Give Birth Extremely Prematurely

The latest medical news that affects your practice - from medical journals, government agencies, scientific conferences, and major media reports.

Via David Holloway
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Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from Articles
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10 Ideas for Creating Literacy Centers With Technology - Edudemic

10 Ideas for Creating Literacy Centers With Technology - Edudemic | Articles for students to read. | Scoop.it
Combine Jenn responding that she has iPads, iPods, laptops, and SMART Boards, with a 2-hour layover in the Dulles airport followed by a two hour flight, and you have a recipe for 10 ways to create literacy centers with technology.

Via John Evans, Anna Frantzis Condoleon
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Tamra Dollar's curator insight, July 19, 2013 11:02 AM

Another great tool for empowering students to write!

Jonathan Jarc's curator insight, July 20, 2013 11:23 AM

Looking for ideas on how to impact literacy with a limited amount of tech? Here's some wonderful thinking along those lines.

 

Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Home of CELLS alive! - Biology


Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from Health Science Literacy for High School
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To Change the Future of Diagnostic Medicine

To Change the Future of Diagnostic Medicine | Articles for students to read. | Scoop.it
To Change the Future of Diagnostic Medicine: Hundreds of medical experts gather from 3-7 December in Bo...

Via Teresa McDaniel
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Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from FOOD? HEALTH? DISEASE? NATURAL CURES???
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Enhancing Safety at Every Step in Food Supply Chain

Enhancing Safety at Every Step in Food Supply Chain | Articles for students to read. | Scoop.it
Few would dispute that the emergence of chilled and frozen food technologies in the last century was a major advance for modern society, transforming all our lives and bringing convenience and choice.

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
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Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from Nutrition, Food Safety and Food Preservation
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Contaminated Cucumbers Sicken 73 in 18 States

Contaminated Cucumbers Sicken 73 in 18 States | Articles for students to read. | Scoop.it
At least 73 people in 18 states have been sickened with salmonella poisoning after eating cucumbers imported from Mexico, government health officials said Thursday.

Via Ron Wolford
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Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from Human Anatomy Resources
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Anatomy & Physiology Class Website

Anatomy & Physiology Class Website | Articles for students to read. | Scoop.it
This site was designed for students of anatomy and physiology. It contains textbook resources, such as chapter review guides, homework sets, tutorials, and printable images. Each chapter has a practice quiz and study tips for learning the topic.

Via Donna Browne
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Donna Browne's curator insight, July 9, 2013 1:31 PM

A well organized, comprehensive anatomy resource from Biology Corner.

Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from healthcare technology
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Medical devices that become obsolete against a smartphone

Medical devices that become obsolete against a smartphone | Articles for students to read. | Scoop.it

We have already looked at how a mobile phone can be used as a tool for helping and monitoring people with certain medical conditions (like for example diabetes patients or people with reduced eyesight), but more and more apps and accessories are appearing in the mHealth field, which make use of the features of smartphones in order to replace other traditional medical devices.

 

The advantage of this type of services and tools is obvious: a considerable cost reduction for medical devices, which not only allows anybody to obtain such devices to monitor a patient at home, but it also makes it less difficult to provide them in developing countries, regions in crisis or areas, where the closest hospital may be hundreds of kilometers away.

Example 1 : SpiroSmart, your Phone turned into a Spirometer

A spirometry may be one of the tests most frequently done on asthma patients and others suffering from breathing problems, fundamentally measuring lung capacity and volume. Although portable spirometers do exist, wouldn’t it be great to be able to take these measures wherever you are with your mobile phone?

 

This is exactly what a group of researchers from Washington University enables you to do with SpiroSmart, an application which - without any additional accessories - allows you to use your smartphone in place of a spirometer. It works in a very simple way: All you need to do, is blow towards the telephone allowing it to analyze the sound frequency. The application uses the user’s windpipe and voice chords to replace the tubes in traditional spirometers.

 

Example 2: MobiUS, Pocket size Ultrasound Scanner

Numerous medical examinations are based on ultrasound scans, that create two- or three-dimensional images of what is going on inside our body (like the womb of a pregnant woman, to give you a very common example). How is it possible to realize these kinds of exams without carrying a big and heavy piece of machinery? Pocket Scanners are one possible option, but they are quite pricy. MobiUS is another possibility.

 

MobiUS, has already received approval from the american FDA to be sold on the mHEalth market. It is a accessory which you can connect to a smartphone or tablet computer and slide it over the part of the patient’s body to be analyzed. The images obtained by the ultrasound accessory appear on our smartphone screen and may be stored or shared immediately with other doctors. And the accessory works with batteries, which makes it possible to use it in areas where no electrical grid is available.

  
Via nrip
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Richard Platt's curator insight, January 18, 2014 12:14 PM

Saw this coming, how about you?

Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from Empathy and Compassion
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Teaching Empathy in Medical School

Teaching Empathy in Medical School | Articles for students to read. | Scoop.it

Some institutions have begun to offer empathy training for their clinicians. At Weill Cornell, we have a number of initiatives that aim to cultivate empathy and humanistic values in our students. Last year, we launched an innovative pilot program that will eventually give students the opportunity to follow one or more patients over the course of their entire four years of medical school. Currently, one first-year and one second-year student are paired together under the supervision of a faculty mentor.

 

Students build relationships with patients by attending doctor's appointments with them, contacting them regularly, and conducting an annual home visit to understand how their diseases impact their daily lives. Students are asked to keep a reflective journal about their experiences, and they participate in monthly mentoring sessions where they discuss psychosocial issues relevant to their patients. A major goal of the program is to prepare students to deliver empathetic, socially, and ethically responsible care by providing them with exposure to patients from the very beginning of their training.

 

Antonio M. Gotto, Jr., MD, 
Laurie H. Glimcher, MD

 


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from Holistic & Alternative Health
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Breast Feeding vs. Bottle Feeding: What's the Right Choice? by Sylvia Anderson - Babies, Children and Teen Health - InsidersHealth.com

What’s the best choice for your new baby … breastfeeding or bottle feeding? Though there is no right answer one way or the other, the best thing you can do is learn about the pros and cons of both before making your decision.


Via InsidersHealth
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Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from Pregnancy, Birth and Early Childhood News
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Energy drinks may increase blood pressure, disturb heart rhythm | American Heart Association

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Energy drinks may increase blood pressure and disturb the heart’s rhythm.Researchers who analyzed seven previously published studies found an increase of 3.5 points in systolic blood pressure for those consuming energy drinks.Consuming energy drinks may increase the chances of developing an abnormal heart rhythm.


Via David Holloway
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Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from Pregnancy, Birth and Early Childhood News
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Safety first: reducing the risks of sleeping with your baby

With so much contradictory information about whether it’s safe for mothers to share a bed with their baby, it’s easy to see why parents are confused.

Via David Holloway
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Rescooped by Lauren Malecha from Pregnancy, Birth and Early Childhood News
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Chubby babies: healthy? - Health Report - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Chubby babies: healthy? - Health Report - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | Articles for students to read. | Scoop.it
New research suggests that weight gain during infancy can be detrimental to health in later life.

Via David Holloway
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