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Fujifilm XF16-55mm F2.8 R LM WR – Review

Fujifilm XF16-55mm F2.8 R LM WR – Review | Art Photography Nick Chaldakov | Scoop.it
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Nick Chaldakov-photographer's insight:

Fujifilm XF16-55mm F2.8 R LM WR – Review

 

•  Positive sides 

+ Quick auvtofokus working well in the dark! 
+  Zoom quality hard 
+ acute image of all panels andfour lens unit 
+ 16 mm, 23 mm, 35 mm and 55 mm in one 
+  quality 
+ performance dust and moisture resistant 
+ Easy to use

 

•  Negative countries 
- of 55 mm F / 2.8 a bit soft

 

•  GALLERY  Fujifilm XF16-55 mm F2.8 sample images

 

English:

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Review: Fujifilm Fujinon XF 50-140mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR | Admiring Light

Review: Fujifilm Fujinon XF 50-140mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR | Admiring Light | Art Photography Nick Chaldakov | Scoop.it

Fujifilm’s X-Series interchangeable lens system has only been around for a bit less than three years, and in that time, they’ve managed to put together a rather impressive lens lineup.  However, missing from that lineup until recently are pro-grade fast zoom lenses.  While the fast standard zoom is set to be released in 2015, Fuji users get the telephoto zoom just before the holidays.  Today I’ll review the Fuji 50-140mm f/2.8 OIS WR.  This is the second weather resistant Fuji lens, and the first constant f/2.8 zoom lens.  This is a pro-grade zoom lens with a pro-grade price, retailing for $1599.  Can this large mirrorless lens meet the very high expectations that Fuji users demand?  Let’s find out......


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Review: Fujifilm Fujinon XF 50-140mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR | Admiring Light

Review: Fujifilm Fujinon XF 50-140mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR | Admiring Light | Art Photography Nick Chaldakov | Scoop.it

Fujifilm’s X-Series interchangeable lens system has only been around for a bit less than three years, and in that time, they’ve managed to put together a rather impressive lens lineup.  However, missing from that lineup until recently are pro-grade fast zoom lenses.  While the fast standard zoom is set to be released in 2015, Fuji users get the telephoto zoom just before the holidays.  Today I’ll review the Fuji 50-140mm f/2.8 OIS WR.  This is the second weather resistant Fuji lens, and the first constant f/2.8 zoom lens.  This is a pro-grade zoom lens with a pro-grade price, retailing for $1599.  Can this large mirrorless lens meet the very high expectations that Fuji users demand?  Let’s find out......


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X-T1 + 56 1.2 impression from a X-E2 user | Albert on Digital Photography Review

X-T1 + 56 1.2 impression from a X-E2 user | Albert on Digital Photography Review | Art Photography Nick Chaldakov | Scoop.it

Got to play with X-T1 at the local Fujifilm store, together with Zeiss 12mm, Fuji 14mm, 23mm, 27mm, 35mm, 56mm 1.2 and 55-200mm lenses.  Coming from X-E2 and have used XPro1/X-E1/X100, here are my impressions:


The EVF is not as lag free as everyone was saying here.  It feels about the same as X-E2.  Blurring still occurs when I pan the camera horizontally.  The blurring is more noticeable with wide angles lenses and less with telephoto.The EVF sure looks big and the uncluttered display is nice (Fuji should have done this since day one).The handgrip design is very nice.  It feels solid and secure.  I'm using the Fuji grip with X-E2 and I'm pretty sure I can skip the additional handgrip with this one.The EV compensation dial is not as stiff as someone was reporting here, about the same as X-E2 and I have no problem changing it with just my thumb.The 4-way controller is sure hard to press.  The buttons are sloped/recessed towards the center which makes them harder to press compared to having flat buttons.The shutter dial detents do not feel quite as positively as X-E2, it has a bit of a mushy feel.  Same with the dials for changing metering and drive mode.The tilting LCD has a solid feel.8fps is fast and I can keep shooting without any slow down.  With X-E2, high speed shooting slows down after a second or two.During the high speed shooting mode, there is no live view between frames.  All I saw were 8 frames presented within the second.  This is the same as X-E2.AF seems about as fast as X-E2.  It could be a little bit faster (hard to tell), as the X-T1 seems to drive the AF motor faster.Shutter sound is quiet, which is the same as X-E2.
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The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1 and X-E1/E2 articles on the Web ... | Thomas Menk

The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1, X-T1 and X-E1/E2 articles on the Web ... | Thomas Menk | Art Photography Nick Chaldakov | Scoop.it


Aspects of Digital Photography focusing on the Fuji X-Pro 1, X-T1, X-E1/E2 and X100s - photographer, reviews, samples and more.

The most comprehensive Collection on Fuji X-Pro1 and X-E1 articles, reviews and X-Pro1 Photographer on the Web!


____________________________________________________________

Curated by official Fujifilm X-Photographer Thomas Menk

____________________________________________________________


Following Thomas Menk on Twitter: http://twitter.com/fuji_x_pro


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Thoughts on the Fuji 23mm f1.4 VS the X100s 23mm f2 | Ed Dombrowski

Thoughts on the Fuji 23mm f1.4 VS the X100s 23mm f2 | Ed Dombrowski | Art Photography Nick Chaldakov | Scoop.it


I recently had the Fuji 23mm F1.4 lens shipped to me. I pre-ordered it the day it was officially announced and it got to me last week. I have been shooting with it for a week or so but am not going to do any sort of image quality review at this time other than to say it is at least as good as all the other Fuji lenses. It is very similar in fit and finish to the 14mm.  I was more interested in writing about the debate that has gone on in my head since it was added to the roadmap. The thought was that when the 23mm f1.4 was released sales of the X100s would dry up. Why would you buy an X100s when you now have a fast 35mm equivalent offer for the X-Pro1 or X-E1?......


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Liquid Photography by Marcel Christ

Liquid Photography by Marcel Christ | Art Photography Nick Chaldakov | Scoop.it
Here, we are featuring here some amazing art shot of Marcel Christ. He is Amsterdam, Netherlands based photographer.
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The Olympus OM-D E-M1 Full Review. The most versatile Mirrorless Camera ever.

The Olympus OM-D E-M1 Full Review. The most versatile Mirrorless Camera ever. | Art Photography Nick Chaldakov | Scoop.it

“The Olympus OM-D E-M1 Full Review. The most versatile Mirrorless Camera ever. Inspiration: a person or thing that inspires. The E-M1 with 17 1.8 at 1.8.”


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Fuji XF 55-200mm f/3.5-4.8 R LM OIS Hands-on … plus more interesting news about the X system | MirrorLessons

Fuji XF 55-200mm f/3.5-4.8 R LM OIS Hands-on … plus more interesting news about the X system | MirrorLessons | Art Photography Nick Chaldakov | Scoop.it

I was given a mere ten minutes to try it, as other people were waiting in line to test it as well, and it was the only sample available. Also, the lens was a prototype, very close to the final version. In that brief time, I used it on an X-Pro 1 and took a couple of pictures around the block. The lens is not too heavy and I find it well balanced with the X-Pro 1 in terms of both weight and ergonomics. The zoom ring wasn’t as smooth as others I’ve tried, but it could be related to the sample I used. Also, the aperture ring, as with other XF lenses, is a little bit too soft and you can inadvertently change the aperture. Since I had such a short window of time, I concentrated on bringing home some interesting shots. I wanted to try the zoom at its fastest apertures but I didn’t realize that I had accidentally changed it to 5.6 the whole time I was out with the lens. Anyway, the blame’s on me! This lens is the first telephoto lens for the X system and Fuji seems to have made it right: the quality is there. It is very sharp, with a nice bokeh that seems to be more pleasant to the eye than traditional telephoto zoom lenses without the constant aperture like this one. The lens is stabilized and while I didn’t try it much, I took a few shot at less than 1/100s and it responded very well. The minimal focus distance is more than acceptable for this type of lens, but don’t expect close macro performance here. It is indeed an interesting lens for those interested in chasing animals in the park or for portraits. Its non-constant aperture won’t make it ideal in low-light performance. As for the autofocus, the X-Pro 1 handed to me had the latest firmware on it that support this new lens, and that is suppose to enhance the autofocus on the X-Pro 1 as well. Again, 10 minutes isn’t enough to judge a lens, but it seems that it possesses the normal Fuji autofocus speed found in the X-pro line, so nothing terribly fast.....


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Thanks for sharing Thomas!
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Liverpool Sunrises with the Fuji X-Pro 1 | Liverpool Photographer

Liverpool Sunrises with the Fuji X-Pro 1 | Liverpool Photographer | Art Photography Nick Chaldakov | Scoop.it


For me, taking the time to watch the sunrise is a spirit-lifting experience in itself.  Every day is new, untold and full of possibilities.  To be out there facing that iconic view, seeing the day being born out of the darkness and lighting up the city where I’ve spent my entire life is quite an evocative thing to witness. That said, it’s not always such a calming experience because as the sun rises and its rays dance over the clouds, occasionally, and perhaps only for a few fleeting seconds, the sunlight skims the atmosphere at just the right angles and your eyes are treated to a fantastic explosion of colour.  It’s at those times when my sleepy mind is suddenly very alert and I’m most likely darting between two cameras I’ve got set up on tripods making sure their shutters are firing and the exposures are looking good.  And when I see those rear LCD previews glowing with same radiance, well, that’s when I don’t mind losing a bit of sleep so much. My usual kit for these sunrise shoots has been a Nikon D700, Nikon 24-70mm with an assortment of Lee filters (ND grads and a Big Stopper), a Fuji X-Pro 1 with the 35mm and 18-55mm XF lens and B&W 10-stop filter.  Let’s not forget the many layers of warm clothing, a flask of something hot and many hours to stand around waiting! The 4-year old D700 still has a place in my heart despite higher resolution offerings from younger siblings and rivals.  It’s reliable and predictable in so much as I know I can get extremely satisfying results from it.  Like a faithful old dog who knows where my favourite slippers, newspaper and pipe are. The Fuji X-Pro 1 on the other hand is still a very new camera, fashioned with classic and retro lines, but underneath its cool, dark exterior lies technology  which would make the Borg salivate.  The X-Trans sensor is innovative with its lack of anti-aliasing filter and funky colour array filter, but software companies have had decades to perfect their algorithms to render ‘traditional’ Bayer pattern sensor data so it’s no surprise there are still improvements to be had.  It’s not all bad news, though, and the X-Pro 1 still has a legion of fans with me being one of them.  Personally, I don’t find the raws that bad when processed in Lightroom.  Certainly, not as bad as some might claim. The styling is great, the handling is great, the autofocus is decent for a contrast detection based system, the sensor is relatively huge for such a small body and in my opinion packs just the right number of megapixels (16).  Crucially, the lenses are excellent (aherm, Sony) which makes the XF system such a great one.  To me, great lenses are the foundation of any system because they’re the pieces of equipment you carry over from one body to the next.  The JPG processing in-camera is good, but I’m still going to continue shooting raw because that leaves me the option of processing in-camera afterwards and because I believe raw support will improve. With all that said, what matters is the end result and whether I like it. I do. Very much so.


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Fujifilm XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 OIS (goes to the Bahamas) | Roel

Fujifilm XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 OIS (goes to the Bahamas) | Roel | Art Photography Nick Chaldakov | Scoop.it


It is the first zoom lens for the Fujifilm X camera system and unfortunately, I did not have a chance to use it as it was not available when I received the X-E1 for testing.  At a trade show in Toronto later that month, I did have a very brief opportunity to use the 18-55mm at the Fujifilm booth, but I could only view the images on the camera’s rear LCD screen (and not a calibrated computer monitor) so I did not feel that I had sufficient data to present an informed opinion. I really wanted to see how this lens performed – especially since I have been spoiled by the superb optical quality of the Fujifilm X prime lenses.  But I was just going to have to wait a bit longer before I could get my hands on this new zoom lens. As I was heading off for a much needed vacation in the Bahamas in December 2012, Fujifilm sent a production copy which I took with me on this trip. This is not an in depth review as I tend not to be a pixel peeper but I wanted to pass on my thoughts – plus, show you a few sample images.....

Final Thoughts

Here is a quick summary of this lens:

 

Pros

 

- excellent build quality

- fast for a variable aperture lens (f/2.8 to f/4)

- focus ring is dampened nicely

- aperture ring feels solid with discreet 1/3 stop settings

- sharp, even wide open

- incredibly sharp when stopped down

- OIS works well

- AF is extremely quiet in operation

- the petal lens hood is a much needed improvement over previous lens hoods

 

Cons

- the $US 699.99 price tag might put some people off

- Linear Motor provides adequate AF speed, but I expected it to be faster


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Fujifilm XF 14mm f2.8 R: will it be wide enough? | Mike Kobal

Fujifilm XF 14mm f2.8 R: will it be wide enough? | Mike Kobal | Art Photography Nick Chaldakov | Scoop.it

“Will it be wide enough or should I wait for the 10-24mm OIS f4?” This is a good question. I paired the Tokina 11-16mm with the Fuji X-E1 and went to Grand Central Station.

It is impossible to answer this question and give a satisfactory answer for everyone. It will mainly depend on how you plan to use it and your subject matter. I for one am very excited about the Fujifilm 14mm F2.8, not because I think it is an ultra wide angle, by current standards it certainly is not, but I find the angle of view very appealing and I like the idea to have a depth of field scale for hyperfocal distance settings. And what we have seen so far from Rico Pfirstinger’s first tests, distortions are not a problem at all, the 14mm appears to be a stellar performer!  The Tokina 11-16mm is probably the best ultra wide angle zoom currently available for APSC sized sensors. Cinematographers are spending big bucks on having it converted to PL mount. The reason? Minimal distortions at every focal length and constant aperture value.

Kudos to Fuji for bringing us an almost distortion free 14mm prime , nothing is more frustrating then trying to correct complex, mustache style, barrel distortion during post-processing, especially when shooting interiors.

As for difference in angle of view, compare the two shots below, at 14mm (21mm equiv. FF) angle of view 89 Degrees, at 11mm (16.5mm equiv. FF) angle of view 108 Degrees. On ultra wide zooms like the Tokina 11-16mm and the Nikkor 14-24mm I find myself usually at the widest end. A notable exception is the Canon L 17-40mm, because it covers true super wide to normal on a FF sensor. The Tokina 11-16mm is a big and heavy lens, especially when mounted on the Fuji X-E1. I found it produced fantastic images and mf wasn’t a problem due to the brightness of 2.8. If you can’t make up your mind about the Fujifilm 14mm, here are a few things to consider:


Pros:
1) “distortion free” prime
2) fast 2.8
3) fast AF, MF with depth of field scale for hyperfocal focusing
4) smaller and lighter then a high quality ultra wide zoom

 

Cons:
1)not really ultra wide
2)the lack of zoom could be a problem in a confined space
3)wide is never wide enough
4)image stabilization (this is debatable on an ultra wide, but can come in very handy shooting dark castles/churches)

 

If you happen to own a Tokina 11-16mm for a different system it might be worth spending approx $25~30 bucks for and X-adapter, it might save you lots of cash! Do a search on Ebay.
I will be getting the 14mm not as an ultra wide zoom replacement but as an alternative to the 18mm when I need something wider. I really hope this lens won’t be too heavy, lots of glass in there


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X-E1 Firmware Update Ver.1.04 | Fujifilm Global

X-E1 Firmware Update Ver.1.04 | Fujifilm Global | Art Photography Nick Chaldakov | Scoop.it

The firmware update Ver.1.04 from Ver. 1.01 incorporates the following issue

1.    Adding the compatibility with "XF14mmF2.8R".
    You will get the full performance of "XF14mmF2.8R", including Manual Focus function.
    
2.    Newly added function
    Shutter release button can be active even if an external microphone or a remote release is connected to USB mini terminal or MIC/REMOTE terminal (Φ2.5mm) of the camera.
    
3.    Improvement in performance
    (1)Accuracy of auto focus performance has been much improved under a various shooting condition.
    Shooting with XF35mm lens, Shooting for the target with relatively high frequency, One-push AF by pressing AE-L/AF-L button,
    
    
    To enable more accurate AF performance with XF35mm lens, please update the firmware of your Fujinon XF35mm lens at the same time. Firwware version must be Ver 2.02 or later.
    
    (2)Audio performance has been optimized for Stereo Microphone MIC-ST1 (sold separately.)
    (3)Improvement of unexpected pixels recorded in the top far-left taken with XF18-55mm Lens under the condition of middle range focal length.


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X-T1 setup guide v:3.00 | John Caz

X-T1 setup guide v:3.00 | John Caz | Art Photography Nick Chaldakov | Scoop.it
So you have downloaded the new firmware, loaded it and have fiddled with it, but somehow feel lost or not sure how to best utilize some of the options available. You’re in luck, read on and I will take you through each setting and show you what I have chosen and for what reason. Maybe my settings will suit your style of photography maybe not, either way, I'm sure you will find it helpful. First, lets do a factory reset to make sure we are starting from scratch. Go to the blue SETUP-UP menu and select SHOOTING MENU RESET>OK and then go back again and select SETUP RESET>OK. Make sure you have a fresh battery and a hot cup of coffee nearby (well at least for those living on the Northern hemisphere!) Now that we are set, let’s start from the beginning.....
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Fuji X Buyer’s Guide :: Lenses | Zack Arias

Fuji X Buyer’s Guide :: Lenses | Zack Arias | Art Photography Nick Chaldakov | Scoop.it

This is part two of my three part Fuji X Series Buyer’s guide. Please visit part one to read my introduction to this series and read my thoughts on the wide array of Fuji X cameras that are on the market. As stated in my camera post, the following information is simply my personal opinion on the Fuji lenses that I have used thus far. This isn’t going to be a comprehensive look at every Fuji lens made or third party lenses simply because I haven’t used every single lens out there on the market. I have used a good number of them, though, so I feel this will be a pretty good overview of what’s available along with some information about why I haven’t used some of the others. I’ll give some links at the end of this post to other resources for you to research this topic more if you choose to. When Fuji developed their interchangeable lens system they brought with them years and years of experience in lens design and manufacturing. Fuji has always made fantastic glass. From high end $62,000 video lenses, to satellite and medical optics, to designing and manufacturing Hasselblad lenses. Then there were all the Fuji cameras and lenses they’ve been making for years and years. To put it simply, Fuji knows glass.........


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A Very Brief Review of the Fujinon XF 35mm 1.4 lens | Colin Nicholls

A Very Brief Review of the Fujinon XF 35mm 1.4 lens |  Colin Nicholls | Art Photography Nick Chaldakov | Scoop.it

I'm just going to focus on the lens for this review, so the same goes if you have this on a XPro 1, XE1, XM1 or any other X camera, either way this lens is awesome, just incredible. As with the other reviews I'm gonna go mostly images on this one with a brief bit about why you should get this lens and just how awesome it is. It is sharp, damn sharp even at 1.4 and for the price it is a steal, sure its more expensive than your standard 50mm prime but its in whole other league, this is what you need if you have an X series system, if you gave me one camera and one lens to shoot a whole wedding I would do it on this, well I have done it on this albeit as a second shooting but I would be more than comfortable rocking this and only this for any wedding.....

Sharpness:

Peoples main love of this lens comes from its outstanding sharpness, I'm not going to make tests and charts, but show two examples of just how good it is, even wide open, which is how I shoot this lens most of the time. You can click the images to get a full screen view, with the crop the images start to soften up and grain becomes a bit more noticeable, but it really doesn't matter, you shouldn't have to crop this aggressively anyways, but if you ever need to the option is there. I do like a nice sharp lens, for me an images that are as crisp as the ones this lens produces are the kind that I want to create for my clients......


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Fujifilm X-T1 | CNet

Fujifilm X-T1 | CNet | Art Photography Nick Chaldakov | Scoop.it


If you're going to spend $1,700 on a kit, there's a long list of alternatives available, from full-frame dSLRs and ILCs like the Nikon D610, Canon EOS 6D and Sony Alpha ILCE-7 to fast APS-C models like the Nikon D7100 or the Micro Four Thirds Olympus OM-D E-M1. I think the X-T1 offers the nicest shooting experience without sacrifices, but still like optical viewfinders for fast action, and the E-M1 performs generally faster overall. It's a tough call, but the X-T1 does deserve a place on your short list......


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Fuji xf 18-55mm vs Fuji xf 14mm | Régis Lessent

Fuji xf 18-55mm vs Fuji xf 14mm | Régis Lessent | Art Photography Nick Chaldakov | Scoop.it


Yesterday, I had the chance to try both the 18-55mm zoom and the 14mm prime. Therefore I thought it might be interesting to publish some pictures to show the difference, in term of field of view, between 18 and 14 mm. In my opinion, those little 4mm make quite a big difference. I like very much the extra dramatic effect the 14mm produces. I warn you, I wasn’t there to make a comparision between the lenses. It’s just afterwards, looking at the pictures I took, I realized I took nearly the same shots with the two lenses. Therefore, I wasn’t exactly on the same spot when I took the different pictures. Anyway, I think it still gives a good idea of the two field of view. On the technical side, I was surprised how the AF of the 18-55 felt so different from the 14mm or the 35mm I own. I would say it’s less « brutal » and less noisy. You don’t feel the lenses moving while the AF is working like it does on my 35mm. The 18-55 is also slightly heavier than the two others. To end, I’d like to thanks the Wshop in Woluwe (for belgian readers) who lent me the lenses. I think it’s great they let you borrow the lenses for a couple of hours for free. As well, it’s the only shop I know in Belgium where you can rent the Fuji lenses. Great to choose wisely the lens that suits you the best.......


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Olympus OM-D E-M1 review | Digital Camera World

Olympus OM-D E-M1 review | Digital Camera World | Art Photography Nick Chaldakov | Scoop.it
Olympus OM-D E-M1 review: will this new Olympus camera appeal to both Micro Four Thirds and Four Thirds users? Find out in our review video.
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Olympus OM-D E-M1 review @ Dpreview

Olympus OM-D E-M1 review @ Dpreview | Art Photography Nick Chaldakov | Scoop.it
Digital Photography Review: All the latest digital camera reviews and digital imaging news. Lively discussion forums. Vast samples galleries and the largest database of digital camera specifications.

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Review: Olympus OM-D EM-1

Review: Olympus OM-D EM-1 | Art Photography Nick Chaldakov | Scoop.it

“GP tests the new Olympus micro four-thirds flagship and discusses the merits of a smaller sensor. (Tested: the new @getOlympus OM-D EM-1 and the merits of a smaller sensor.”


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Fuji XF18-55mm F2.8-4

Fuji XF18-55mm F2.8-4 | Art Photography Nick Chaldakov | Scoop.it
Nick Chaldakov-photographer's insight:

 

@' 2013 Photography © Nick Chaldakov. 

 

Camera: Fujifilm X-E1
Lens Fuji XF18-55mm F2.8-4 R LM

F5, S 1/320, ISO 200, in camera sharp+1
Post processing: Photo Shop + Sharp

The original file is a little soft. The structure of the image is good for processing. The end result is good. But with a sharp lens like Fuji 60 Makro would be better.

Conclusion: Sharpness of Fuji XF18-55mm F2.8-4 R is a little lower than I would like. Lens have good reproduction of black. This is very important. Good zoom lens. But for art images you need a Macro Fuji 60/2.8 ore new Carl Zeiss 50/2.8 Macro. I hope it will be better...

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Fujifilm XF 18-55mm F2.8-4 R LM OIS Review | PhotographyBLOG

Fujifilm XF 18-55mm F2.8-4 R LM OIS Review | PhotographyBLOG | Art Photography Nick Chaldakov | Scoop.it


The Fujifilm XF 18-55mm F2.8-4 R LM OIS is much more than just a standard kit lens. It's remarkably sharp in the image centre almost throughout the entire focal range, except at full 55mm telephoto where optimum sharpness isn't achieved until f/8. Similarly edge sharpness is also commendably high at most settings, with the same exception of the 55mm focal length. The fast maximum apertures of f/2.8 at 18mm and f/4 at 55mm make it easy to creatively throw the background out of focus, with the seven-blade iris diaphragm achieving some appealing bokeh effects. Vignetting is practically a non-issue, and chromatic aberrations are present but very well-controlled. There is some barreling at the 18mm wide-angle focal length, but no pincushion distortion of note at the 55mm setting. The lens' macro performance is rather unremarkable but its close-focus point of 30cm still comes in handy when including a foreground interest in the image, as you often do in landscape and architectural photography. The lens also benefits from a fast and quiet auto-focus mechanism, generously wide zoom ring and a welcome aperture ring which makes it quick, easy and precise to set this key element of exposure. The lens mount is, thankfully, made of metal and, thanks to an internal focusing (IF) system, the front element and filter thread does not rotate on focus, which is very good news for those using polarisers and ND grads on a regular basis. The only real fly in the ointment is the price - at around £599 / $799 this isn't exactly a cheap lens, which may hold back many enthusiasts, especially in the current economic climate. Compared to a similarly specced DSLR lens with fast apertures, however, it could be viewed as something of a bargain, especially when you consider that the Fujifilm 18mm and 35mm primes are even more expensive. And if you're looking to buy a body to go with it, then the new X-E1 and 18-55mm kit is a veritable steal.

Ratings (out of 5)
Design: 4.5
Features: 4
Ease-of-use: 4.5
Image Quality: 4.5
Value for money: 4


Via Thomas Menk
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Fujifilm XF 14mm f/2.8 R | Roel

Fujifilm XF 14mm f/2.8 R | Roel | Art Photography Nick Chaldakov | Scoop.it


I was fortunate enough to have the opportunity to test a pre-production copy of this new prime to provide some feedback to Fujifilm.  This article will discuss my experience with it plus provide you with some of my initial images taken with this lens.

Before you can use this lens with your X-Pro1 or X-E1,  you will need to upgrade the firmware on the camera body (which allows for lens corrections plus enables a few other features).  I was supplied with (non-public) beta-firmware from Fujifilm (V2.02 for my X-Pro1) but I suspect when this lens is publicly released, a new firmware version (V2.03 or higher) will be available for download.

Final Thoughts

Here is a quick summary of this lens:

 

Pros

- excellent build quality and lightweight

- fast f/2.8 aperture

- the AF/MF clutch is a welcome feature to move quickly from AF to MF

- focus ring responds nicely when using manual focus (as opposed to the original focus by wire)

- Depth of Field markings

- Distance Scale markings

- aperture ring feels solid with discreet 1/3 stop settings

- sharp, even wide open

- very little distortion

- surprisingly flare resistant

- the petal lens hood is an improvement over the previous ones made by Fujifilm

 

Cons

- the $US 899.99 price tag might put some people off

- 14mm (21mm equivalent) is very wide and will challenge any photographer’s composition skills

- the focus ring could use more dampening, but that may change in the final production units


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Fujifilm XF 14mm f/2.8R - First Tests | Mike Mander

Fujifilm XF 14mm f/2.8R - First Tests | Mike Mander | Art Photography Nick Chaldakov | Scoop.it

These are the first tests I shot with the new Fujifilm XF 14mm f/2.8R wide-angle on my X-E1. All shots were processed in Phase One's Capture One Pro v7.02 with some slight post-processing in Adobe Lightroom v4.3. Some perspective distortion correction was applied on a few of the night shots, but no corrections for barrel distortion were applied, nor were they needed. Note that it was windy, so there is some movement and blur in trees and foliage on some of the night shots. The XF 14mm is equivalent to 21mm on a full-frame body and quite simply, this new lens is very nearly the best ultra-wide prime I have ever shot with. The only lens I've used that is in the same league optically, and that is wider than 24mm (full-frame equivalent), is Canon's EF 17mm f/4L TS-E and it, of course, is manual focus as well as big, heavy and very expensive. As mentioned, none of these photos have had any barrel distortion correction. The XF 14mm seems essentially free from any sort of field curvature, there is virtually no detectable chromatic aberration and only the barest hint of purple fringing along extremely high-contrast boundaries, for example, with power lines or branches against a white, blown out sky. Even the edges of the frame are essentially tack sharp wide open at f/2.8, with the extreme corners following by f/4 already. There is also no green/magenta bokeh fringing and what little background blur one can get with an ultra-wide at f/2.8 (see frame 9), looks to be very smooth and pleasing as well. Internal reflections seem well controlled, contrast is good... although I have yet to see how it performs in daylight with the sun shining on the front element or when the sun is included in the frame. The only noticeable flare spots I saw in all these photos that were due to the lens itself, are below and the bright light in frame 22 and over the pillar in frame 33, although there are a few shots where there is some reflection off the inside of the front protective filter (frame 32 for example). The resolution of this lens is so consistent and even, that one can take a series of tripod shots, zoom into an extreme corner and flip through images shot from f/4 to f/11 and there is virtually no detectable change or improvement in corner sharpness, presuming there are no depth of field issues there of course. Only at f/2.8 in the extreme corners, is there a hint of contrast and sharpness loss, and beyond f/11, diffraction starts taking a visible toll across the entire frame. I would say it is actually sharpest in the f/4 to 5.6 range, which is truly superb for such a wide-angle lens. The XF 14mm f/2.8 R has exceeded my wildest dreams and is truly an exceptional performer!


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