Art Direction in Entertainment
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The 5 Most Dangerous Creativity Killers

The 5 Most Dangerous Creativity Killers | Art Direction in Entertainment | Scoop.it
The what the hell! effect and other ways we can short circuit our creativity.
Karen Aguilar's insight:

This article by Gregory Ciotti is very interesting and important to read for everyone interested in any art activity. It gives examples of the things you should avoid when you're an artist, and when you're in charge of a creative team.

 

Another good point of the ideas it shows, is that it also talks about team work. This is an article any director should read, because your job is to place the skills of every member of your team where they match, so that they can work better for you.

 

As an art director, it's important for you to know the importance of encouraging your team and don't limit their creative ideas. That's what creative people do, and it's quite hard to work creatively when your ideas are limited, so I agree with the author. 

 

10/10

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The Smart Creative’s Guide To Dressing for Work

The Smart Creative’s Guide To Dressing for Work | Art Direction in Entertainment | Scoop.it
Research tells us that what we wear affects how we think.
Karen Aguilar's insight:

I liked this article because it talks about the importance of the dress code to get any job you want. It's something that maybe people don't usually think about, but in order to give the best first impression, is totally something you should take into account. According to Jarrett, people who are dressed up quite formal and manly like (even girls who are dressed in a masculine way), are perceived as more aggressive and forceful, which make them more likely to be hired. But if you're a creative artist, like any art director, then what you'd like your future bosses to see is a hip outfit. That way you'd be perceived as a creative person. You have to "dress to impress" for a job interview, and you must dress accordingly to it. 

 

I think this article is interesting, but a little bit shallow. I agree in the fact that you must always show your personaliy through your clothes and use outfits that match the events you're wearing them for, but sometimes that's not the only thing that people will look at. In some enterprises, they'll also take into account if you're wearing fashionable stuff or if they're from an expensive bran. That's when the shallowness comes in.

 

8/10

 

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Stage direction: why don't more visual artists do theatre?

Stage direction: why don't more visual artists do theatre? | Art Direction in Entertainment | Scoop.it
Mark Lawson: Picasso, Munch and Gormley have all dabbled, but imagine the inspired collaborations that could result if more major artists turned their talents to stage design
Karen Aguilar's insight:

In this article, Mark Lawson makes a reflection towards the fact that there are not many visual artists who work in theatre. I think it's an interesting article for people who are passionate about theatre like myself, because I've always wondered about the people who create the environment on stage. I've always felt fascinated about the furniture, the lighting, the paintings and in general, the art you see on stage, because part of a good play production is the scenery. 

 

According to Mark Lawson, there aren't many stage art directors because stage design is a separate specialism from the rest of the designs. He talks about famous painters who have also worked for stage productions in the art direction, such as Dalí, Picasso, Munch, among others, but those are facts most people don't know. Another problem for stage art directors is the budget: "A second economic factor comes into play when a major artist works on stage: a theatre set created by, for example, Damien Hirst or Freud or Johns would potentially by worth millions, and so create issues of security and insurance"

 

I liked this article because it's hard to find people who write about art direction on stage, but I'd have liked to see more examples in musical theatre, which I think has the best art productions on stage. Those and plays based on Pedro Almodóvar's stories.

 

8/10

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Bioshock Infinite: Part 1 – Art Direction and Visual Storytelling | Terminally Incoherent

Bioshock Infinite: Part 1 – Art Direction and Visual Storytelling | Terminally Incoherent | Art Direction in Entertainment | Scoop.it
Karen Aguilar's insight:

This review about Bioshock Infinite is one of the most complete ones you'll ever find on the net. It's a must-read for art directors who want to work in video games, because it's a good example of how the visual narrative works in video games and how to really create a whole environment for the players. 

 

The author seems to be very passionate about video games, that's why he knows perfectly well the importance of creating a whole environment in a video game, because it's part of the experience of playing. Bioschock Infinite uses a lot of contrasts in its visual narrative, which is what makes it so good. These are tools an art director must know when creating a visual environment, be it in a movie, a play or a video game, in this case.

 

10/10 

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Encore's World of Film & TV: Art (Direction) isn't Easy; Incoherent Oscar: Art Direction

Encore's World of Film & TV: Art (Direction) isn't Easy; Incoherent Oscar: Art Direction | Art Direction in Entertainment | Scoop.it
Karen Aguilar's insight:

This is a quick article with predictions on the films that were nominated last year to win the Oscar for Best Art Direction, and you might wonder why is is worth reading now that we already know that Anna Karenina won? Well, I'd say that this article has a brief information about the art direction of each movie and is quite interesting for people who like to know more about Art Direction, because here are some names of both directors and movies from those directors you'd like to check out. 

 

I'm surprised it doesn't even mention Moonrise kingdom, though. I think it really deserved an Art Direction honorable mention at least. 

 

This article shows a mere opinion, though. I also think Anna Karenina was the best option to win the Oscar for Art Direction this year. 

 

8/10

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Maxim Zhestkov: As In A Dream

Maxim Zhestkov: As In A Dream | Art Direction in Entertainment | Scoop.it
Maxim Zhestkov, a 22-year-old director, video artist, and motion and graphics designer discusses alternative practices for inspiring creativity.
Karen Aguilar's insight:

This article/interview by Lee Pinkas is one of the most intwresting I've read because of the unusual and effective methods young Maxim Zhestkov uses to get new ideas and create, among other things, new spaces and designs. 

 

He says he gets them from two things mainly: from his dreams and from whatever he finds on the net. He spends hours in Wikipedia trying to learn and see new things about every topic, so he can nurture his mind. He also talks about working without getting any sleep at all! Like he says: "I like when the schedule shifts. When you're working for 48 hours with no sleep, you feel everything around you quite differently. I really love those kinds of experiments. Everything becomes so crystal clear and the idea bends into new patterns. Those are moments of enlightenment.” 

 

Personally, I find his methods interesting and original, and what I liked the most about this article is that the readers can easily feel identified with this young artist, specially young students who are passionate about design and have got that feeling of liking more your work after spending hours breaking your head to get a great idea. 

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peter&wendy: Simplicity Is Key

peter&wendy: Simplicity Is Key | Art Direction in Entertainment | Scoop.it
Xavier Encinas, founder of peter&wendy, takes some time out to talk to us about his creative motivations, client interaction, and Swiss influences.
Karen Aguilar's insight:

Thir article is based on an interview the author, Heather Ann Snodgrass, had with Xavier Encinas about peter&wendy, which is a graphic design studio. The interview is quite interesting, because Xavier Encinas is an expert in the matter of design and he talks about how he works, how conceptualizing and seeing things as a whole first, helps to work on doing something quite innovative and creative and basically about the creative process. He also talks about the importances of keeping things "simple, clean and fresh", referring to the fact that their mission as designers is to create something that can be understood by everyone, in other words, translating the world through images. 

 

I liked this interview because it was brief but concise and the information it has, although seems to be the same you could get from any designer, isn't useless for any design artist.

 

8/10

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33 things I know about Art Direction

33 things I know about Art Direction | Art Direction in Entertainment | Scoop.it
Things that might just help young creatives, about the Art direction.

Via Baiba Svenca
Karen Aguilar's insight:

David Bell is an expert in design, and he shows this throughout this presentation. All the content in the slides is quite accurate for the topic of "art direction". What I liked the most about his brief but goog-looking article was that he gave important data and tips not just with words but also with the visual part. I think that's an important thing when it comes to designers telling us about design.

 

On the other hand, I think part of the content is only understood by designers, because it has many references to visual knowledge, that maybe not all of the people is able to understand. I'd like David Bell to make "33 things I know about Art Direction" for dummies. 7/10

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The Power of Structured Procrastination

The Power of Structured Procrastination | Art Direction in Entertainment | Scoop.it
Embrace the Nuclear Option and allow your procrastination to work for you.
Karen Aguilar's insight:

Sometimes when you're an artsy person you're not so compromised to the other important tasks you have to do. This is an article for you! It shows a structured way of procrastination so that you can still get done everything you have to get done. 

 

The important thing is that you divide your big task into small tasks that you can keep on procrastinating while doing some of the other small tasks. By the deadline, you'll have everything done and you won't feel so pressured to finally do the ONE BIG TASK. In fact, you'll feel the pressure of the deadline, and you'll feel more motivated, so maybe you'll do it with very little time, but it might be done better because of the pressure and motivation. So if you're one of those procrastinators, this is something you should read.

 

In the other hand, we shouldn't procrastinate at all, but that's something you just can't get rid off sometimes. 

 

8/10

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The Surprising Benefits of a Creative Rivalry

The Surprising Benefits of a Creative Rivalry | Art Direction in Entertainment | Scoop.it
From Michelangelo to the Beatles, history tells us that a healthy rivalry can push us to new limits — as long as we avoid obsession.
Karen Aguilar's insight:

I absolutely loves this article. It gives an important tip for every creative person and artist in the world: get a rival. It's interesting to see all the examples we have from famous and successful people who ever had a rival. Some benefits a creative rivalry could have is that knowing a person who somehow defies you, brings the best out of you because you don't want to let them win. 

 

However, according to Christian Jarrett, this rivalry may turn into something negative if you get too obsessed about it and about your rival. It's important to keep this kind of relationship healthy, and why not? Even friendly, just like Paul McCartney and John Lennon did in some part of their lives.

 

I think the article is quite good, and it talks about a specific artistic rivalry: that of Michelangelo and Raphael, which makes us think of both of them as equally brilliant. I'd like to have seen more specific artistic examples, though.

 

9/10

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Developer Blog #3 – Environmental Art and Design « Interceptor Entertainment

Developer Blog #3 – Environmental Art and Design « Interceptor Entertainment | Art Direction in Entertainment | Scoop.it
Karen Aguilar's insight:

This article written by Cade Cook, Environment artist in Rise of the Triad,  gives an insight in the development of this new video game. Apparently he belongs to a new group of young artists who work together in Rise of the Triad. 

 

This article should be read by all artists who want to learn about creating environments in video games. It gives quite precise examples with pictures and even measures. It might work as a tutorial as well in how to use the platforms where they program all the visuals in a video game.

 

However, I'd like it to be more specific and maybe explain some terms for non-gamers and non-programmers like me. Other than that, it's a good article and the advantage is that it's written by the same people who work on the video game, so they absolutely know what they're writing about.

 

9/10

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Nothing’s insurmountable on set of Oz the Great and Powerful

Nothing’s insurmountable on set of Oz the Great and Powerful | Art Direction in Entertainment | Scoop.it
On Hollywood film sets, it’s Todd Cherniawsky’s job, as supervising art director, to be the glue holding everything together.
Karen Aguilar's insight:

This article gives an insight to what it's like to be an art director. Todd Cherniawsky talks about hiw work as the art director's assistant in "Oz the Great and Powerful". If you saw the movie, you're most likely to agree in the fact that the art direction is amazing: the landscapes it shows, and how they use the black-and-white scenes and transform it into the colorful world of Oz show how art direction can be used as an important narrative element. 

 

Cherniawsky has been very successful freelancing, he has an interesting CV, because he originally studied Architecture and then he stepped into the Film and Video Arts Society Alberta. That's where he started being the arts-and-crafts man he is now. He's a great example of how to make a good career in art direction.

 

A phrase I loved from this article is the following: “We look for the impossible, but in a few days or a few weeks or a few months, it won’t be.” I think it's a good motto for art directors everywhere.

 

However, I'd like to have known more about how he helped his director to build the visual narrative, froe example. But it's a great article.

 

9/10

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Paperman

IIntroducing a groundbreaking technique that seamlessly merges computer-generated and hand-drawn animation techniques, first-time director John Kahrs takes the art of animation in a bold new direction with the Oscar®-nominated short, "Paperman." Using a minimalist black-and-white style, the short follows the story of a lonely young man in mid-century New York City, whose destiny takes an unexpected turn after a chance meeting with a beautiful woman on his morning commute. Convinced the girl of his dreams is gone forever, he gets a second chance when he spots her in a skyscraper window across the avenue from his office. With only his heart, imagination and a stack of papers to get her attention, his efforts are no match for what the fates have in store for him. Created by a small, innovative team working at Walt Disney Animation Studios, "Paperman" pushes the animation medium in an exciting new direction.


Via Gregg Morris
Karen Aguilar's insight:

This is a great review of what "Paperman" is. It talks a little about the story and the fact that it is made with a new technique that combines the best of both virtual and hand-drawn animation, which is why it was so innovative. Besides, the art in it is so neat, is a must-watch for art directors who want to see an example of awesome black-and-white art. This short film won the Oscar to Best Animated Short Film, and after watching it, there's no wonder why.

 

10/10

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Jonathan Moore: Interactive & Productive

Jonathan Moore: Interactive & Productive | Art Direction in Entertainment | Scoop.it
New Ezra, aka Jonathan Moore, discusses his layered approach to organization and the need for constant client communication -- like it or not.
Karen Aguilar's insight:

This article by the Behance Team of 99U y quite interesting for two things: Jonathan Moore is a great example of success in the Design industry and in this interview he shares his insight on what really matters when you're trying to get a job as a designer.

 

Jonathan More is an interactive and productive designer that has worked for quite important companies, such as Disney, Adobe, Electronic Arts and Adidas, and although now he belongs to 2Advanced Studios as the Senior Art Director, he talks about how hard he had to work his way up so he could become an important figure. 

 

I like this interview a lot because it encourages new designers to go as far as they want to go in their profession. First we find a few tips, and then he gives his most important advice for younger designers: "Formal education is incredibly important, but not essential to achieving success in the creative industry. Determination and drive will see you through". I always love when experienced people give these kind of advices and work as an example of success, because I share that thought of persistance. 

 

9/10

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Art Direction and Design

Art Direction and Design | Art Direction in Entertainment | Scoop.it
Sure, your design’s composition is perfectly balanced, the typographical hierarchy works, and the contrast is bang on. But, when you step back and take a look, how does it make you feel? Does your design evoke the right emotion?
Karen Aguilar's insight:

Dan Mall writes like an expert about what art direction truly is about. I think the whole article can be resumed with this line: "Art direction is about evoking the right emotion, it’s about creating that connection to what you’re seeing and experiencing.". I couldn't agree more with it.

 

Mall proposes that the emotion an artist wants to evoke in its audience is what will make people turn around and maybe stay longer watching the web page they're watching. This article is specially about web art direction and design, but I really think it can be applied to all kinds of art direction as well.

 

This article is quite complete, it is very well structured and has many good examples and references on the topic, which helps a lot if you want to become a good art director. It talks about how to make good choices in typography and design. It sounds quite useful for art directors, specially those who want to work in editorials or web pages. Take a look!

 

I'd have liked to see more examples, though. I think it uses only a few for each main idea. But great article, indeed.

 

8/10

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