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Eco-Resort Pedras Salgadas by Diogo Aguiar and Luís Rebelo de Andrade

Eco-Resort Pedras Salgadas by Diogo Aguiar and Luís Rebelo de Andrade | Art and Spaces | Scoop.it
The new eco-resort of Parque de Pedras Salgadas, Portugal, consists of a set of seven small houses in perfect harmony with the surrounding outstanding nature.

Designed in a modular prefabrication system but flexible to adapt to the specific places within the park, these houses result in several different combinations of the same three modules (entrance/bathing – living – sleeping) creating different morphologies and different dialogues with the surrounding nature, wisely occupying the empty spaces between the trunks of large trees and, at the same time, allowing each home to be unique, special and worth visiting.
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Ecobuilding: Cooper Point House by Mickey Muennig

Ecobuilding: Cooper Point House by Mickey Muennig | Art and Spaces | Scoop.it

74-year-old green architect mickey muennig is featured in this month’s wall street journal magazine. muennig was been building green-roof architecture for over 30 years in big sur, california. one of his latest eco-buildings is this one on cooper point, covered in a roof of wild grasses. while he has been a long-time eco-architecture practitioner, muennig remains an unsung hero of the green movement. the cooper point house is built into the landscape and features concrete walls on two side and all-glass walls in between. the green roof above is a continuation of the landscape that feature thick covering which helps make the house more fireproof and provides insulation. the home is ultra-efficient and runs off the grid thanks to a bank of solar panels. inside the home prominently features douglas fir beams that support the home with a large skylight to let in the natural light. the home covers 2,745 sq. feet with its 3 bedrooms. the profile of the home and muennig in this month’s wall street journal magazine is written by alastair gordon with photographs by simon watson.


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Angeles's comment, December 3, 2012 9:19 PM
Nice!!!!!!
archYable's comment, December 3, 2012 10:03 PM
Yes, it´s really interesting! Thanks
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Casa El Pangue tiered house by Elton + Léniz

Casa El Pangue tiered house by Elton + Léniz | Art and Spaces | Scoop.it

Panoramic Pacific views can be enjoyed from terraces created by the tiered levels of this hillside house in Chile by architects Elton + Léniz.

 

The house is developed towards a central vertical circulation, connecting the 4 levels and 3 terraces in which the house is organized, in order to get as much of the view of the pacific ocean as possible, taking advantage of the height offered by the natural slop of the site.

 

The constructive system is generated upon sustaining concrete walls that terraces the site in three levels. The fourth level was designed in lightweight structure with wood siding.

 

The living room level appears as a great terrace surrounded by planters which replaces the railings.


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archYable's comment, November 29, 2012 12:31 PM
thanks to you
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Room for sustainable thinking

Room for sustainable thinking | Art and Spaces | Scoop.it
Inspirational conference centre in the treetops of Hechtel-Eksel in Belgium


A gem has been created within the woods of Hechtel-Eksel in Belgium. Described as inspirational, The TREEHOUSE has the vision to bridge the extensive gap between ecology and the economy.

 

Sappi, The Flemish Forest and Nature Agency, the commune of Hechtel-Eksel and Proximity have joined forces with the aim of encouraging companies, politicians and organisations to embrace sustainability in their daily activities. They all share one vision: to enhance the quality of the environment and social responsibility for the benefit of people, planet and prosperity.

 


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archYable's comment, November 19, 2012 9:12 PM
thanks for your interest
Angeles's comment, November 19, 2012 9:17 PM
you´re welcome!
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How Biomimicry Can Help Designers and Architects Find Inspiration To Solve Problems

How Biomimicry Can Help Designers and Architects Find Inspiration To Solve Problems | Art and Spaces | Scoop.it
How you can unlock the design-enhancing secrets of biomimicry using online resources like AskNature and Biomimicry 3.8.

 

Shortly before his death in 2011, Steve Jobs said, “I think the biggest innovations of the 21st century will be at the intersection of biology and technology. A new era is beginning.” The crossroads that he spoke of actually has a name – biomimicry – and while it has been helping inventors, designers and architects innovate in genius ways for centuries, its value has become even more apparent in the past few years as we realize that Mother Nature is one of the universe’s most incredible designers. If you’re not yet familiar with biomimicry, it’s a word that describes finding design inspiration from nature to solve human problems. There are examples of biomimicry all around us – velcro, airplanes, solar panels modelled on ivy, and even buildings modelled after termite mounds. The people who came up with these inventions were obviously intelligent, but even more important, they were good observers able to make a connection between an issue they wanted to address and a solution that already existed in nature. If you’re an architect, designer or inventor facing a design dilemma that you simply can’t get past, or if you’re just feeling stuck in a rut, the answer may be right in front of you – if you know where to look.

 


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Vila Alstrup in Demark: energy-plus design

Vila Alstrup in Demark: energy-plus design | Art and Spaces | Scoop.it

The house on the shore with a view of the Wadden Sea is an energy-plus house, which means that it produces more electricity and heat than it uses.

 

This was achieved without compromising on the exclusive qualities of a large home, including panoramic sea-views. The architecture uses clear and simple expression, open and transparent to the sea and more closed and private towards the neighbors. The unusual geometry of the volume is combined with a calm and unpretentious detailing, and a restrained material palette.

Designed with ‘passive house’ principles, the home is compact in form, with large windows facing the view to the south-west, to make optimal passive use of the sun’s heat. The angle also respects the shoreline protection zone, creating a triangular floor plan. The sloping roof is angled to optimize the performance of the solar heating cells. Passive solar heat gain is absorbed and accumulated in the interior concrete walls and floor slabs, while the south-west facing balcony and overhangs shade the facades and control the amount of seasonal solar energy. The balcony is a free-standing concrete slab completely eliminating any cold-bridging to the interior...

 

Read more about this contemporary and contextual green design at the article link...


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TOYO ITO: "What Was Metabolism? Reflections on the Life of Kiyonori Kikutake"

TOYO ITO: "What Was Metabolism? Reflections on the Life of Kiyonori Kikutake" | Art and Spaces | Scoop.it

The Metabolist Movement in the 1960s established the foundation from which contemporary architecture in Japan has emerged up to the present. Even today, the visionary architectural and urban projects created by the leading Metabolist Kiyonori Kikutake continue to shine brightly, according to Toyo Ito. In this lecture, he will consider Metabolism’s significance today through his rereading of Kikutake's works of that time.

 

Toyo Ito was born in Seoul; after graduating from the University of Tokyo, Department of Architecture, he worked at Kiyonori Kikutake Architects and Associates before establishing his own office, under the name Urban Robot, in 1971. With Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects since 1979, Ito has completed many notable projects, including the widely published Sendai Mediatheque (2000), Tower of Winds in Yokohama (1986), Tama Art University Library (2007), and Toyo Ito Museum of Architecture (2011). "Ripples," a metal street furniture piece, won the Compasso D'Oro, the prestigious Italian furniture prize, in 2004. Toyo Ito's many awards received for architecture include the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement, at the 2002 Venice Architecture Biennial, and the Golden Lion for Best Pavilion, for the Japanese Pavilion at Venice in 2012.


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