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Graphene nanoribbons could be the savior of Moore’s Law

Graphene nanoribbons could be the savior of Moore’s Law | arslog | Scoop.it

With each new generation of microchips, transistors are being placed closer and closer together. This can only go on so long before there’s no more room to improve, or something revolutionary has to come along to change everything. One of the materials that might be the basis of that revolution is none other than graphene. Researchers at the University of California at Berkeley are hot on the trail of a form of so-called nanoribbon graphene that could increase the density of transistors on a computer chip by as much as 10,000 times.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Thierry Bodhuin's curator insight, February 18, 2014 4:10 AM

Moore's law may continue ... 

 

Yaroslav Writtle's curator insight, February 18, 2014 6:44 AM

Interesting stuff - wonder what could this mean for computing capacity 10 years down the line?

Benjamin Rees's curator insight, March 27, 2015 8:06 AM

For the past few decades, the concept of Moore's Law has proven to be relatively accurate in saying that the density of transistors able to be placed on an integrated circuit roughly doubles every two years. However, as transistors are manufactured to be placed increasingly close together, it can be foreseen that there will soon be no more room for improvement using current methods and materials. Recent developments in graphene technology may allow for more spatially efficient  circuits in the future, thereby continuing this trend of doubling transistor density.

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Artificial cells evolve proteins to structure semiconductors

Artificial cells evolve proteins to structure semiconductors | arslog | Scoop.it

Scientists have applied genetic engineering to create proteins that can be used to create electronics. They've used the tools of molecular biology and principles of evolution to find proteins that can make new structures of silicon dioxide, commonly found in computer chips, and titanium dioxide, often used in solar cells.

In this work, the scientists demonstrated that directed evolution of a mineral-producing protein could create materials with never-before seen structures. The next challenge is to learn how to change the selection pressures to evolve a specific property, such as semiconductor performance. “This approach will begin to allow the same DNA-based evolutionary processes that have created seashells and skeletons to be harnessed to advance human technologies,” they write.


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