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Contemporary Art, Science, Technology
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Contiki: The Open Source Operating System for the Internet of Things

Contiki: The Open Source Operating System for the Internet of Things | arslog | Scoop.it

Via Andrea Graziano
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10 Books That Could Change the Way You Understand Modern Cities

10 Books That Could Change the Way You Understand Modern Cities | arslog | Scoop.it
“ We have just entered the Urban Age, when the majority of the world's population lives in cities. Most of us may live in the metropolis, but these miracles of engineering and cultural productivity are almost impossible to understand. These ten books will help you untangle the mysteries of today's city life.”
Via Artur Coelho
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From solar panels to batteries, algorithms are becoming key to designing new materials

From solar panels to batteries, algorithms are becoming key to designing new materials | arslog | Scoop.it

Materials science is being transformed by algorithms, and computers are now selecting new material combinations to test in the lab.


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Building a Better You? The Era of Trans-Human Technology (Op-Ed)

Building a Better You? The Era of Trans-Human Technology (Op-Ed) | arslog | Scoop.it

Are we cyborgs? That depends on what your definition of "is" is.


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Iris van Herpen - Biopiracy

Iris van Herpen - Biopiracy | arslog | Scoop.it

Via Alessio Erioli
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The Inside Story of Oculus Rift and How Virtual Reality Became Reality | Gadget Lab | WIRED

The Inside Story of Oculus Rift and How Virtual Reality Became Reality | Gadget Lab | WIRED | arslog | Scoop.it
Oculus has found a way to make a headset that does more than just hang a big screen in front of your face. By combining stereoscopic 3-D, 360-degree visuals, and a wide field of view—along with a supersize dose of engineering and software magic—it hacks your visual cortex. As far as your brain is concerned, there’s no difference between experiencing something on the Rift and experiencing it in the real world.

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Transhumanisme : de la science-fiction à la réalité

Transhumanisme : de la science-fiction à la réalité | arslog | Scoop.it

Les avancées technologiques dans les domaines de la bionique et de la génétique se succèdent à un rythme toujours plus élevé. Découvrez la nature de ces découvertes et leurs applications au travers de notre dossier consacré au transhumanisme, cette tendance qui rassemble scientifiques et technologues convaincus que le futur de l'humanité passe par une fusion entre hommes et machines. 


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luiy's curator insight, May 19, 2:24 PM

Neuromancien, RoboCop, Ghost in the Shell, Deus Ex... Les concepts évoqués dans ces œuvres de fiction, de l'interface neuronale à la réalité augmentée sans oublier les exosquelettes, les prothèses biomécaniques ou les modifications nanotechnologiques, sont en effet désormais à notre portée, quand elles ne sont pas déjà implémentées. Cela passe par les smartphones devenus indispensables et par l'essor des objets connectés : smartwatches, lunettes (voire lentilles), vêtements. Mais aussi et surtout par les progrès effectués dans le domaine médical, qu'il s'agisse de génétique ou de bionique.

Rescooped by arslog from Computational Design
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Chromosonic

CHROMOSONIC project is an electronic textile that changes color, using the Arduino open-source platform. The dynamic changes in the textile color derive from processed…

Via Alessio Erioli, Hassan Raza Balti
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Everything in the Universe Is Made of Math – Including You | DiscoverMagazine.com

Everything in the Universe Is Made of Math – Including You | DiscoverMagazine.com | arslog | Scoop.it
In this excerpt from his new book, Max Tegmark proposes that our reality isn't just described by mathematics, it is mathematics.

Via Roberto S L Naboni
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Droplets - Liquid that Thinks

Droplets - Liquid that Thinks | arslog | Scoop.it
We have developed a novel robotic platform to study swarming behavior — Droplets that form a liquid that thinks Goal Our goal is to test swarming algorithms on a large scale, bring Droplets into a new college course, use Droplets to teach K-12 science, and provide Droplets for artistic use. Platform A Droplet is a small mobile robot that is based on 10 years experience in swarm robotics. The Droplets are the only platform that, allow indefinitely long experiments by being powered from the floor, move and communicate omni-directionally, and can measure the distance and orientation of neighboring robots, allowing for complex pattern formation and self-assembly experiments. Why Swarming? Swarming is ubiquitous in nature. You can observe it in termites, slime mold, and ants, but if you think about it, everything is a swarm. Atoms as old as the universe interact with each other following the most basic laws of physics to form molecules, cells, brains and people. Our lab wants to understand and teach these mechanisms, a.k.a swarm intelligence, using the Droplets. A swarm of Droplets will allow us to research important applications for swarm robotics such as, self-assembly, distributed learning, cell-differentiation and the emergence of life-like behavior at an unprecedented scale! Applications In addition to performing research in swarming algorithms we plan the following activities. Teach "Swarm Intelligence" as a college level class: The Droplet Platform allows us to teaches classes with hands on activities, with each student working own their own small swarm throughout the semester to develop a large scale experiment involving the entire swarm. Teach K-12: We are working with the St. Vrain School district's innovation center and other schools to develop teaching modules that range from organic chemistry (every Droplet acts as an atom) to modeling the immune system and, of course, robotics! Art Installations: We are working with Michael Theodore and other artists to understand how matter can become alive. A swarm of Droplets is a totally new tool for artistic expression and we want to work with artists like Marina Zurkow and Stelarc who push the boundaries of our understanding of how we, our bodies, nature and technology interact. Your Support Your donations will help us to set off setup cost and allow us to reach cheaper costs per robot through volume discounts. You can also suport this project by supporting educational or artist packages. A detailed list of our rewards is available under the "market" tab of this project.A breakdown of our preliminary cost estimate is listed below. As you can see, the volume discounts really kick in when we start mass-production of Droplets. Quantity 100 500 1000 Shell Mold $50.00 $10.00 $6.00 Shells $1.00 $0.80 $0.50 PCB Manufacture $5.00 $1.70 $1.50 Parts ATMEL Mic. $5.00 $3.00 $2.50 Parts - Supercap $7.00 $4.00 $3.50 Parts - Other $18.00 $13.00 $10.00 Assembly $5.00 $4.00 $3.00 CU Facilities Overhead $9.00 $3.50 $3.00 Cost per Droplet $100.00 $40.00 $30.00 Our Team Nikolaus Correll (Asst. Professor) PhD in Computer Science EPFL 2007 MS in Electrical Engineering ETH 2009 Asst. Professor in Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering (by courtesy), Aerospace Engineering Sciences (by courtesy) Affiliate, Material Science Engineering program Anshul Kanakia (Ph.D. Candidate) BS in Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2010 Research interests: Design and Application of Swarm Robot Algorithms John Klingner (Ph.D. Student) BA in Computer Science, Cornell College, 2012 BA in Physics, Cornell College, 2012 BA in Mathematics, Cornell College, 2012

Via Alessio Erioli
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Rescooped by arslog from [THE COOL STUFF]
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How to make big things out of small pieces

How to make big things out of small pieces | arslog | Scoop.it
Researchers invent a new approach to assembling big structures — even airplanes and bridges — out of small interlocking composite components.

Via Roberto S L Naboni
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Flexible all-carbon electronics can be integrated onto plants, insects, and more

Flexible all-carbon electronics can be integrated onto plants, insects, and more | arslog | Scoop.it

Carbon-based electronics are being widely explored due to their attractive electrical and mechanical properties, but synthesizing them in large quantities at low cost is still a challenge.


Now in a new study, researchers have developed a new method for synthesizing entire integrated all-carbon electronic devices, including transistors, electrodes, interconnects, and sensors, in a single step, greatly simplifying their formation. The inexpensive electronic devices can then be attached to a wide variety of surfaces, including plants, insects, paper, clothes, and human skin.

 

The researchers, Kyongsoo Lee, et al., at the Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) in Ulsan Metropolitan City, South Korea, and the Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute in Changwon, South Korea, have published a paper on the new synthesis method in a recent issue of Nano Letters.

 

The new approach takes advantage of the unique atomic geometries of carbon to synthesize entire arrays of electronic devices, specifically carbon nanotube transistors, carbon nanotube sensors, and graphite electrodes.

 

"Our all-carbon devices (transistors and sensors) are composed of (i) carbon nanotubes (as channels) and (ii) graphite (as electrodes)," said Jang-Ung Park, Assistant Professor at UNIST.


The electrode part needs metallic materials whose resistance is very small with the negligible change by external bias." "Both the carbon nanotubes and graphite are carbon," he said. "Depending on the bond structure of carbon, the carbon nanotubes can exhibit semiconducting properties and the graphite can show metallic properties. We designed multiple catalysts to synthesize the carbon nanotubes and graphite locally with the desired structures of electronic devices. In this way, the all-carbon devices can be synthesized." 


The electronic devices can also be integrated onto various surfaces via van der Waals forces. For example, after wetting the transistors and sensors, the researchers showed that they can be attached to the leaf of a live bamboo plant and to the epidermis of a live stag beetle. The researchers also demonstrated that the sensors could be fitted onto the surfaces of a fingernail, a particulate mask, a protective arm sleeve, adhesive tape, and newspaper.

 

The widespread application of all-carbon electronics in outdoor environments could be useful for a variety of reasons. Here the researchers show that the sensors can detect very low levels of DMMP vapor, which is used for producing nerve agents such as soma and sarin. The sensors could also be used to monitor environmental conditions, including temperature, humidity, pollution, and infections. All this can be done without an on-board power source.

 

"We integrated antennas with our devices," Park said. "Thus, the wireless transportation of power and sensing signals was possible with no battery."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Andreas Bastian Creates Incredible Bendable 3D Printed Mesostructured Material

Andreas Bastian Creates Incredible Bendable 3D Printed Mesostructured Material | arslog | Scoop.it
When it comes to designing and printing on 3D printers, the most common types of materials used are PLA and ABS plastics. These materials are sturdy, yet have a

Via Roberto S L Naboni
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Ionut Anton's curator insight, April 30, 10:48 AM

3d printed bended material

Rescooped by arslog from Machinimania
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Submissions for the Machinima Expo 7 are now OPEN « THE ...

Submissions for the Machinima Expo 7 are now OPEN « THE ... | arslog | Scoop.it
The Machinima Expo 7 is now accepting submissions for its 7th annual virtual film festival which will take place on November 22 & 23rd, 2014. You can submit your film through our website (Use the SUBMIT link below) from ...

Via Henrik Safegaard - Cloneartist
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Henrik Safegaard - Cloneartist's curator insight, June 4, 6:05 AM

5 Simple Rules for submitting your film to the Expo 7

  1. 1. Your film must have animation in it. Any form of animation. Any length.
  2. 2. Your film cannot have been submitted to a previous Expo
  3. 3. If you use copyrighted music in your film we will only consider it for screening NOT for our jury competition. 
  4. 4. You must provide a link from Vimeo or Youtube for us to download your film (you can make it private if you want)
  5. 5. You will have to fill out our application providing us with contact info, credits and a few snapshots from your film for publicity. 
Click  http://machinima-expo.com/v3/ for more info.
Rescooped by arslog from Cabinet de curiosités numériques
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Interactive Thunderstorm Installations

Interactive Thunderstorm Installations | arslog | Scoop.it
Symphony in D Minor - Those who just survived an encounter with Sandy will probably not be strolling into the Symphony in D Minor installation any time soon. It is an in...

Via Audrey Bardon
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Robot Plants Grow Just Like Your Real Plants - ScienceGymnasium

Robot Plants Grow Just Like Your Real Plants - ScienceGymnasium | arslog | Scoop.it

Via Alessio Erioli
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Can the Nervous System Be Hacked?

Can the Nervous System Be Hacked? | arslog | Scoop.it
Welcome to the brave new world of bioelectronics: implants that can communicate directly with the nervous system in order to try to fight everything from cancer to the common cold.

..

Conceptually, bioelectronics is straightforward: Get the nervous system to tell the body to heal itself. But of course it’s not that simple. “What we’re trying to do here is completely novel,” says Pedro Irazoqui, a professor of biomedical engineering at Purdue University, where he’s investigating bioelectronic therapies for epilepsy. Jay Pasricha, a professor of medicine and neurosciences at Johns Hopkins University who studies how nerve signals affect obesity, diabetes and gastrointestinal-motility disorders, among other digestive diseases, says, “What we’re doing today is like the precursor to the Model T.”


Via Wildcat2030, Xaos
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Hard to Be a God: Brilliant Russian Film Imagines Humanity Without a Renaissance

Hard to Be a God: Brilliant Russian Film Imagines Humanity Without a Renaissance | arslog | Scoop.it
The first thing I saw when I arrived in the Netherlands for this year's International Film Festival Rotterdam was a glossy print of Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring, blown up and sprawled ac...

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Mlik Sahib's curator insight, May 20, 4:41 AM

"The film is a battle cry against those who seek to snuff art out of the world, a call for us to not slide further back into our natural barbaric state. It tells us that whatever the threat, culture is only our only weapon against an endless deluge of muck and filth and shit. And it reminds us that, though all of it, great art must survive."

Rescooped by arslog from The Aesthetic Ground
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$8,793 Worth of [digital] art - we make money not art

$8,793 Worth of [digital] art - we make money not art | arslog | Scoop.it

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Brain-machine interface capable of learning - E & T Magazine

Brain-machine interface capable of learning - E & T Magazine | arslog | Scoop.it

The first brain-machine interface system capable of learning commands has been developed in Japan.

The system, designed to help people with severe motion or speaking disabilities, is the first of its kind addressing the excessive mental load existing systems place on a user. Every time the user wants to perform even a simple action, he or she has to focus their mental energy to deliver the message, which could be very tiring.

“We give learning capabilities to the system by implementing intelligent algorithms, which gradually learn user preferences,” said Christian Isaac Peñaloza Sanchez, a PhD candidate at the University of Osaka, Japan.

“At one point it can take control of the devices without the person having to concentrate much to achieve this goal," he said.

For the past three years, Peñaloza Sanchez has been developing the system which uses electrodes attached to the person’s scalp to measure brain activity in the form of EEG signals. The signals show patterns related to various thoughts and the general mental state of the user as well as the level of concentration.

Currently, the system can learn up to 90 per cent of common instructions such as controlling a wheel chair and navigating it around a room.

After the system learns the command from the user, the action could be triggered either by pressing a button or by a quick thought. While performing the automated action, the system looks for the so-called error-related negativity signal – a reaction in a human brain when an incorrect response is initiated – for example if the system opens a window instead of turning on the TV.

"We've had pretty good results in various experiments with multiple people who have participated as volunteers in our in vivo trials,” said Peñaloza Sanchez.

“We found that user mental fatigue decreases significantly and the level of learning by the system increases substantially."


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Delicate Paper Sculptures Suspended in Mid-Air by Peter Gentenaar

Delicate Paper Sculptures Suspended in Mid-Air by Peter Gentenaar | arslog | Scoop.it
From limitations come creativity. It’s an age-old adage that’s been repeated in almost every industry. And it rings true for the Netherland-based artist Peter Gentenaar, whose billowing paper sculptures were born out of what he couldn’t do with

Via Alessio Erioli, Luciana Santos.
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Robot Film "Construct" Could Change Everything You Know About CGI | The Creators Project

Robot Film "Construct" Could Change Everything You Know About CGI | The Creators Project | arslog | Scoop.it
Combining motion capture with ray tracing, the forthcoming film could start a VFX revolution.

Via Xaos
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Rescooped by arslog from Cabinet de curiosités numériques
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Sand Noise Device - YouTube

The Sand Noise Device (SND) is both a complex generative music system as well as a novel and intuitive interface for influencing and interacting with this sy...

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Rescooped by arslog from Philosophy everywhere everywhen
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The Daily Habits of Highly Productive Philosophers: Nietzsche, Marx & Immanuel Kant

The Daily Habits of Highly Productive Philosophers: Nietzsche, Marx & Immanuel Kant | arslog | Scoop.it

Ever wonder how famous philosophers from the past spent their many hours of tedium between paradigm-smashing epiphanies? I do. And I have learned much from the biographical morsels on “Daily Routines,” a blog about “How writers, artists, and other interesting people organize their days.” (The blog has also now yielded a book.) While there is much fascinating variety to be found among these descriptions of the quotidian habits of celebrity humanists, one quote found on the site from V.S. Pritchett stands out: “Sooner or later, the great men turn out to be all alike. They never stop working. They never lose a minute. It is very depressing.” But I urge you, be not depressed. In these précis of the mundane lives of philosophers and artists, we find no small amount of meditative leisure occupying every day. Read these tiny biographies and be edified. The contemplative life requires discipline and hard work, for sure. But it also seems to require some time indulging carnal pleasures and much more time lost in thought.


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Krishna Del Toso's curator insight, May 14, 3:45 AM

Avere una vita cadenzata e regolare in effetti si dice porti ottimi benefici anche alla produttività! Che ne pensate? Felice giornata! :-) k

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The Virtual Reality Renaissance Is Here, But Are We Ready?

The Virtual Reality Renaissance Is Here, But Are We Ready? | arslog | Scoop.it
With tech like Oculus, we may be nearing a new VR era. Yet the average consumer still can't picture the practical applications, much less stomach the cost.

Via Susan Bainbridge, Ghislaine Boddington
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