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Contemporary Art, Science, Technology
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‘Pictures From the Moon’ - Holograms at the New Museum

‘Pictures From the Moon’ - Holograms at the New Museum | arslog | Scoop.it

«Holograms haven’t been cool for a long time. I’m old enough to remember when they were, at least to a 1980s kid raised on “Star Wars” and “Jem and the Holograms.” Somehow they’ve been left out of the great 3-D revival, confined to credit cards, scanners and other useful but dull items.

True, the reincarnation of Tupac Shakur at this spring’s Coachella festival had everyone talking about holograms for a millisecond. But it turned out that Tupac wasn’t actually a hologram; he was a digital animation projected on glass, using a 19th-century magician’s trick, no less.

“Pictures From the Moon: Artists’ Holograms 1969-2008,” at the New Museum beginning on July 5, should restore some of the hologram’s original techno-futuristic cachet. Accompanying a larger survey of art and technology called “Ghosts in the Machine,” it will explore the various ways artists have used holograms since they were introduced in the 1960s...» - Karen Rosenberg

 

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Prosthetic Knowledge Picks: Plants

Prosthetic Knowledge Picks: Plants | arslog | Scoop.it

«A collection of items from the Prosthetic Knowledge Tumblr archive and around the web, around the theme of 'Plants'...»

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Is Documenta 13 post-human?

Is Documenta 13 post-human? | arslog | Scoop.it

«Is Documenta 13 post-human? Three blitzschnell dispatches by Quinn Latimer, Filipa Ramos, and Ana Teixeira Pinto provide very different accounts of this friendly Frankenstein of an exhibition—an “ambitious world of worlds” (Ramos) or “engaged with the world that we (joyfully, sorrowfully, weirdly) inhabit” (Latimer). Rich in animal, vegetal, and other worldly influences, Teixeira Pinto perhaps best surmises the exhibition in...”

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edited by Angela Plohman, A Blueprint for a Lab of the Future

edited by Angela Plohman, A Blueprint for a Lab of the Future | arslog | Scoop.it

«Grounded on the previous " The Future of the Lab", this new publication expands the topic on a much broader level. This book includes documentation of Baltan Laboratories' first three years of activity, revealing the many projects supported and initiated there. Essays and interviews with various collaborators (focused on the lab concept), and several other texts of different lengths complete the work. Beyond being a self-celebrating volume or lab portfolio, the book has evolved into a precious compendium of a concept and is well-focused throughout as it sketches a detailed blueprint of a future lab. The format avoids preconceptions and how-to instructions, instead allowing strategies and needs to emerge from practices, experiments and from abstracting the experiences of the artists involved. This results in a timely challenge as labs are able to play a strategic role in...»

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Animal: The Other Side of Evolution by Ana Rajcevic

Animal: The Other Side of Evolution by Ana Rajcevic | arslog | Scoop.it

«London College of Fashion graduate Ana Rajcevic has created a series of tusks, horns and spines for the human body. Called Animal: The Other Side of Evolution, the sculptural pieces are based on exaggerated animal skeletons and designed to fit over the face, neck and head...»

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Artificial cells evolve proteins to structure semiconductors

Artificial cells evolve proteins to structure semiconductors | arslog | Scoop.it

Scientists have applied genetic engineering to create proteins that can be used to create electronics. They've used the tools of molecular biology and principles of evolution to find proteins that can make new structures of silicon dioxide, commonly found in computer chips, and titanium dioxide, often used in solar cells.

In this work, the scientists demonstrated that directed evolution of a mineral-producing protein could create materials with never-before seen structures. The next challenge is to learn how to change the selection pressures to evolve a specific property, such as semiconductor performance. “This approach will begin to allow the same DNA-based evolutionary processes that have created seashells and skeletons to be harnessed to advance human technologies,” they write.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Patterned by Nature

«Patterned by Nature was commissioned by the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences (naturalsciences.org) for the newly built Nature Research Center in Raleigh, North Carolina. The exhibit celebrates our abstraction of nature’s infinite complexity into patterns through the scientific process, and through our perceptions. It brings to light the similarity of patterns in our universe, across all scales of space and time.

10 feet wide and 90 feet in length, this sculptural ribbon winds through the five story atrium of the museum and is made of 3600 tiles of LCD glass. It runs on roughly 75 watts, less power than a laptop computer. Animations are created by independently varying the transparency of each piece of glass.

The content cycles through twenty programs, ranging from clouds to rain drops to colonies of bacteria to flocking birds to geese to cuttlefish skin to pulsating black holes. The animations were created through a combination of algorithmic software modeling of natural phenomena and compositing of actual footage.

An eight channel soundtrack accompanies the animations...»

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An Interview with Edward Boatman, Co-Founder of The Noun Project

An Interview with Edward Boatman, Co-Founder of The Noun Project | arslog | Scoop.it

«The Noun Project is a seemingly infinite collection of black-and-white symbols put into the public domain. As the founders put it, it is an attempt to organize the world’s visual language into one online database. Edward Boatman, one of the project’s founders, is also its sole gatekeeper. Each symbol on the database was either collected off the Internet or created by designers around the world. Boatman approves every submission to the project and assigns each icon a word — a noun, of course, either an object or a concept. The images are often surprisingly evocative, despite their simplicity, and unlock a potential for wordless communication for anyone with an Internet connection.

Boatman was working in architecture design when he noticed it was surprisingly difficult to find basic, high-quality symbols on the web, even for common transportation symbols used by the government. The Noun Project was launched shortly thereafter in December 2010. Now the scope of the Noun Project is limitless. As Boatman told me, the project could create a symbol for, potentially, every noun in the world. Boatman (and co-founders Sofya Polyakov and Scott Thomas) are looking ahead to making the project a sustainable business.

I talked to Boatman about the purpose behind the project, design for social good, and some of the challenges in creating a visual database that’s always growing.

SS: The Noun Project has thousands of icons. What are you looking for in a good image?

EB: Simplicity is key. One thing I always try to articulate for best design practices in a symbol is this idea of only analyzing the essential facts of the object or idea. It’s really fun. First you have to analyze it, and then...»

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Complexity and Evolving Synthetic Soil

Complexity and Evolving Synthetic Soil | arslog | Scoop.it

«Twenty-first century society draws from a world that is less determined by objects and increasingly shaped by connectivity. The clear either/or distinctions that formerly informed experience are being replaced by a much more fluid understanding of the world. Identity is not fixed, but shaped by networks where people and ‘things’ can coherently exist in many states. This ‘complex systems’* view extends to the characterization of nature, which is made up of many interacting bodies. Some of these are human, others living and many other participating agencies that are dynamic, yet are not thought of as being alive. Yet the animal, plant and mineral kingdoms represent different kinds of organizing networks that are entwined and constitute our living world. The study of complex systems has become an important scientific study that requires interdisciplinary collaboration to characterize their properties. Networks, which share patterns of organization, are at the heart of complex systems. This helps us understand poorly understood complex systems, such as metabolic networks, by making analogies with well-known ones, such as the Internet. Complex systems are usually represented as diagrams whose points of convergence, or ‘nodes’, represent the various participating bodies. The connections between these active sites are represented topologically to signify the interactions between them. Structural features of complex systems are...»

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Book Review: “Artist Animal” by Steve Baker, University of Minnesota Press

Book Review: “Artist Animal” by Steve Baker, University of Minnesota Press | arslog | Scoop.it

«Artist Animal examines the work of contemporary artists who directly confront questions of animal life, treating animals not aesthetically or symbolically but rather as beings who actively share the world with humanity. Featuring full-color examples of their art, it situates artists within the wider project of thinking beyond the human, asserting art’s power to open new ways of thinking about animals.

Animals have always been compelling subjects for artists, but the rise of animal advocacy and posthumanist thought has prompted a reconsideration of the relationship between artist and animal.In this book, Steve Baker examines the work of contemporary artists who directly confront questions of animal life, treating animals not for their aesthetic qualities or as symbols of the human condition but rather as beings who actively share the world with humanity.

The concerns of the artists presented in this book — Sue Coe, Eduardo Kac, Lucy Kimbell, Catherine Chalmers, Olly and Suzi, Angela Singer, Catherine Bell, and others — range widely, from the ecological to the philosophical and from those engaging with the modification of animal bodies to those seeking to further the cause of animal rights. Drawing on extensive interviews he conducted with the artists, Baker explores these vital contributions...» - Jo-Anne Green

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NextNature Theme: Hypernature

NextNature Theme: Hypernature | arslog | Scoop.it

«(...)Human design has made nature hypernatural. Hypernature is an exaggerated simulation of a nature that never existed. It’s better than the real thing: a little bit prettier, slicker and safer than the old kind. Hypernature is culture in disguise...»

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Post Digital Print. The Mutation of Publishing Since 1894 by Alessandro Ludovico

«A series of activities around the publication of Post Digital Print. The Mutation of Publishing Since 1894 by Alessandro Ludovico.
A collaboration between Onomatopee, Baltan Laboratories and Piet Zwart Institute.

Post-Digital Print, The Mutation of Publishing Since 1894 is an extensive investigation into the relationships between traditional and digital publishing, outlined in six chapters. The book starts from the announcement of the death of print, looks at how avant-garde art movements strategically used the printed medium, what the role of paper should be in the future, similarities and differences between print and online media, the digital archiving of printed content, and the importance of personal and public networks for the development of new print strategies and products...»

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"American Dreamers", Strozzina, Center for Contemporary Culture, Palazzo Strozzi, Florence

"American Dreamers", Strozzina, Center for Contemporary Culture, Palazzo Strozzi, Florence | arslog | Scoop.it

«American Dreamers, the exhibition currently on view at Strozzina, Center for Contemporary Culture at Palazzo Strozzi in Florence, invites us to question what remains of the American dream in this age of weak economy, war on terror and housing crisis.

(...)How do contemporary artists react and comment on the situation? While many of them have chosen to document the social and economic crisis, others are using it to build a refuge, an alternative world made of fantasy and illusions. This second reality might sometimes present a veneer of nostalgia and hedonism but it always comes with a dark undercurrent.

(...) American Dreamers remains open Strozzina, Center for Contemporary Culture at Palazzo Strozzi in Florence until 15 July 2012.» - Regine

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Book Review: Remix Theory: The Aesthetics of Sampling, by Eduardo Navas

Book Review: Remix Theory: The Aesthetics of Sampling, by Eduardo Navas | arslog | Scoop.it

«Remix Theory: The Aesthetics of Sampling is an analysis of Remix in art, music, and new media. Navas argues that Remix, as a form of discourse, affects culture in ways that go beyond the basic recombination of material. His investigation locates the roots of Remix in early forms of mechanical reproduction, in seven stages, beginning in the nineteenth century with the development of the photo camera and the phonograph, leading to contemporary Remix culture. This book places particular emphasis on the rise of Remix in music during the 1970s and ’80s in relation to art and media at the beginning of the twenty-first Century. Navas argues that...»

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Embedded Structures: An Interview with Shilpa Gupta

Embedded Structures: An Interview with Shilpa Gupta | arslog | Scoop.it

«Shilpa Gupta's work sometimes takes place outside of or leaves the gallery, and ranges from photographs and objects to websites and interactive video. I spoke with the Mumbai-based artist over email:...»

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Changing states of matter, May 31 – July 28, 2012 Brand New Gallery, Milan

Changing states of matter, May 31 –  July 28,  2012 Brand New Gallery, Milan | arslog | Scoop.it

«The group exhibition Changing states of matter, a show that sets out to reveal the processes behind artistic creation, processes that involve a ‘hypothetical production’ of the real, taken to the extreme limit of sensory experience. Through fragmentation of the initial work, this group of artists probes matter in ways that bring it to light in new forms and guises, giving rise to mysterious worlds obtained by the subversion of traditional artistic techniques. Each of the artists included in this group show has chosen a means of expression on the basis of his or her own experience of tangible matter and private memories. Thus matter becomes a metaphor for the structures of the society and the reality in which we live, and its aggression turns into a practice that can be used to explore the relationship with otherness and the mutual exchange that is constantly going on between people and objects.
Although some of the works presented in this exhibition may seem, in the accepted terms of the history of art, very traditional, the difference comes from subversion of the clichés inherited from and connected with the genre. They lay bare an evident tension between thought and the process of constitution, which makes it possible to conceive a new mode of sculpture that offers a kaleidoscopic vision of indeterminate spaces...»

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Paranoid Shelter, invisibly boxed

Paranoid Shelter, invisibly boxed | arslog | Scoop.it

«A high density of monitoring devices crowds the space of the installation "Paranoid Shelter", a project by the architecture research group fabric | ch. Despite the word "shelter" reminding of an atavistic sense of protection given by a closed and protected space, the skeletal appearance of the work is already alienating. The installation space is in fact occupied by three tall posts, dark and imposing, from which some steel cables depart, following the invisible boundary of the cones of the shoots of a videocamera that is also positioned on the posts. Intersecting each other, the cables draw a network - not very thick but compelling. The volume drawn by the intricacies of cables is a hyper-monitored area where sensors, cameras and microphones measure and track any movement or sound, temperature variation, the concentration of O2 and CO2, atmospheric pressure, light variations etc.. The data are recorded in realtime, stored in different databases according to the specific type of information, and finally crossed at various levels and related to the time and the space through an advanced system of complex analysis. The recorded activities are made available to visitors through a wifi access point network. Such a hyper monitored microcosm makes visible the mechanisms of...» - Chiara Ciociola

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'Technosensual', Wien, June14/Sept2, 2012

'Technosensual', Wien, June14/Sept2, 2012 | arslog | Scoop.it

"The exhibition ‚TECHNOSENSUAL: where fashion meets technology‛ presents electronic textiles and wearable technologies created by international haute tech couture designers. Curated by Anouk Wipprecht, the exhibition will open on June 14 at 20:00 at freiraum quartier21 INTERNATIONAL to kick off the 'MQ Summer of Fashion."


Via Andrea Graziano
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Point Cloud

«Point Cloud is an attempt to reimagine our daily interaction with weather data. Weather has always had a unique place in our lives, because it has a multiplicity that encompasses both the concrete and the indeterminate. It is the intangible context within which we build our lives and our cities, but it is also the physical element against which we create protective shelter. Most of the time it is an invisible network that we can see but are not aware of; yet it can manifest in a spectacle or disaster, come forward and activate our senses, make us forget our rationality in delight or fear. With modern scientific and technological developments, we can now deploy sophisticated monitoring devices to document and observe weather. Yet despite these advances, our analysis and understanding of meteorology is still largely approximate, and in many cases, inaccurate. Weather continues surprise us and elude our best attempts to predict, control, and harness the various elements. In contrast, however, the nuances of weather’s continuously shifting states are largely oversimplified as the information is transmitted into our daily experience. Our various home and mobile devices most likely distill a forecast into static representations, such as numeric values or simple infographics of sun, clouds, or rain. There is a deep discrepancy between the flatness of the visualizations we are accustomed to, and the rich mixture of tactility and perceptibility of our immediate physical experience. As a critical response to these issues, Point Cloud emerges as a sculptural form defined by a thin wire mesh, driven asynchronously by 8 individual servos controlled via Arduino...»

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Tomás Saraceno’s ‘Cloud City,’ on the Met’s Roof

Tomás Saraceno’s ‘Cloud City,’ on the Met’s Roof | arslog | Scoop.it

«Participatory art is all the rage these days, an ever-expanding category and, increasingly, a means for museums to signal their hipness to the younger, broader audiences they so desperately want to attract. Nothing says accessible like something you interact with physically.

Such art comes in many guises. It can range from relatively domestic tasks, like cooking a meal, to intricate trompe l’oeil environments that replicate or exaggerate huge chunks of reality. Somewhere in between are essentially abstract structures that sometimes involve the use of lights or mirrors, or sometimes jungle-gym-like arrangements that you navigate one way or another, walking under or through, or climbing over, perhaps pausing to sit or lie down.

Often borrowing from science, design or architecture, they might be described as fun-house formalism. It’s not all bad, but a lot of it is fairly mindless.

You could probably trace its origins partly to Richard Serra’s disorienting torqued ellipses of steel of the ’90s. Among the most extreme and certainly the least time-consuming recent iterations are Carsten Höller’s slide-through tubes. One of the most successful is Anish Kapoor’s giant, extravagantly reflective, biomorphic stainless-steel sculpture, nicknamed “The Bean,” in Millennium Park in Chicago.

Tomás Saraceno’s “Cloud City” is a particularly prominent example of fun-house formalism...» - Roberta Smith

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Anatomical Typewriter Sculptures by Jeremy Mayer

Anatomical Typewriter Sculptures by Jeremy Mayer | arslog | Scoop.it

«Wow. Words can’t describe how cool this is (especially given his process)! Jeremy Mayer has mastered the disassembling and reassembling of old typewriters into anatomical figures, both human and animal. The figures fit together seamlessly in an intricate, delicate, and yet also robust way. It seems like...»

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Phil Toledano’s Plastic Surgery Beauties, Kopeikin Gallery, L.A.

Phil Toledano’s Plastic Surgery Beauties, Kopeikin Gallery, L.A. | arslog | Scoop.it

«London based artist Phil Toledano’s provocative “A New Kind Of Beauty” series examines the extreme lengths people go to alter, change, and morph their appearance through plastic surgery and other cosmetic alterations. Balancing on the verge of not looking human these individuals are pushing the limits of identity politics.

“I’m interested in what we define as beauty, when we choose to create it ourselves. Beauty has always been a currency, and now that we finally have the technological means to mint our own, what choices do we make? Is beauty informed by contemporary culture? By history? Or is it defined by the surgeon’s hand? Can we identify physical trends that vary from decade to decade, or..."» - Amir

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Book Review: Sabine Hochrieser, Michael Kargl, Birgit Rinagl, Franz Thalmair - Content. Form. Im-material

Book Review: Sabine Hochrieser, Michael Kargl, Birgit Rinagl, Franz Thalmair - Content. Form. Im-material | arslog | Scoop.it

«This book starts with an excellent question: "Why is it still easier to get an entire museum collection on the Internet than to get a single work of Internet-based Art in a museum space?". It coherently synthesizes five years of work by the Vienna-based collective CONT3XT.NET, founded in 2006 and active in the production of artworks and exhibitions of internet-based art. Reflecting their own methodology the book is not a strictly curatorial work, nor a chronology of their activities, but a collection of texts and artworks embodying their own (peculiar) attitude. The editors are not interested in defining internet art, but they do spend a lot of time on the "mediation of the fact that (internet-based art) is art", translating it into exhibition strategies and projects, something they call "translation work." This is at the core of their activity, trying to untangle the "variability" of internet-based art, and then...»

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Faith Condition, religious technologies

Faith Condition, religious technologies | arslog | Scoop.it

«Faith Condition is the graduation project in Industrial Design by Lukas Franciszkiewicz, a designer who has focused his creative practice on some important questions concerning our media society. In particular Franciszkiewicz focused his research on the inability of traditional religions to fully understand the notion of altered sensory perception. The work Faith Condition questions a trend seen in many contemporary technologies: they transmit security and trust rather than transparency – a mechanism that is at the core of every religion. From this concept, Franciszkiewicz has made a number of 'objects for the conditioning of faith' that are able to recreate the atmosphere, perceptions and actions that we usually associate with religious practices. These objects are very much appreciated for their great attention to detail; their surfaces evoke...» - Vito Campanelli

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What is Media Archaeology? — out now

What is Media Archaeology? — out now | arslog | Scoop.it

«It’s out, and gradually in book stores — What is Media Archaeology? (Polity), my new book about media archaeology (what a surprise)! It picks up where the edited volume Media Archaeology: Approaches, Applications, and Implications (Huhtamo and Parikka) left off; this means the implications bit, and how media archaeology relates to other recent discussions in art, cultural and media theory: software studies, new materialism, archives, and more. In other words, it complements the earlier collection...» - Jussi Parikka

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