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Contemporary Art, Science, Technology
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Fluxus Reader edited by Ken Friedman (1998) – Free Digital Edition available for DL

Fluxus Reader edited by Ken Friedman (1998) – Free Digital Edition available for DL | arslog | Scoop.it

"In celebration of the 50th anniversary of Fluxus—the international laboratory of art, architecture, design and music—Swinburne University of Technology has released a free digital copy of The Fluxus Reader.

Fluxus began in the 1950s as a loose, international community of artists, architects, composers and designers. By the 1960s, Fluxus had become a laboratory of ideas and an arena for artistic experimentation in Europe, Asia and the United States. Described as ‘the most radical and experimental art movement of the 1960s’, Fluxus has challenged conventional thinking on art and culture for half a century. Fluxus artists had a central role in the birth of such key contemporary art forms as concept art, installation, performance art, intermedia and video. Despite this influence, the scope and scale of this unique phenomenon have made it difficult to explain Fluxus in normative historical and critical terms.

In The Fluxus Reader, editor Ken Friedman offers the first comprehensive overview of this challenging and controversial group. The Fluxus Reader is written by leading scholars and experts from Europe, the United States and Australia.

First published in 1998, the book was out of print for several years and only available from rare book dealers and galleries. To celebrate the 50th anniversary of Fluxus in 2012, Swinburne University arranged for a complete digital edition in PDF format, copy-enabled with full search features..."

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The Smithsonian Utilizes Recent Strides In 3D Technology

The Smithsonian Utilizes Recent Strides In 3D Technology | arslog | Scoop.it

"The Smithsonian, the world’s largest museum and research institution, has embarked on an ambitious endeavor to share a lot more of their work with the world. The museum holds an overwhelming 137 million pieces in their archive, but is only capable of exhibiting approximately 2% to the public at any given time. Through the use of advanced 3D tools, the museum plans to digitally archive, replicate, and showcase a number of their most treasured works in galleries and exhibitions across the globe.

For this process, the museum will use a 3D scanner to retrieve each piece’s geometric measurements, which will be then be archived, while a 3D printer will be used to physically produce the structures. Though it is an intricate, lengthy process, the finished reproductions come out with remarkable accuracy..." - Alexander Pack

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Dialogue between Bertram M. Niessen and Geert Lovink

"BMN: There is a struggle going on between different views of the ownership of the data produced and shared throughout the Web. While companies and governments are claiming for a stronger copyright control, individual users and on-line communities are reclaiming open-source oriented solutions that redefine many immaterial products as digital commons. You have different ideas about the solutions to face this critical situation, especially regarding the nature of commons. How do you frame the contemporary situation from this point of view? And what future scenarios do you forecast?

 

GL: I am not a copyright expert nor an active Creative Commons evangelist. As a radical pragmatist I use Creative Commons as often as possible. My take on this issue has been to question the uncritical use of terms such as ‘free’ and ‘open’. We should no longer listen to (free) software experts in this regard as they are still in demand in terms of employment, worldwide, and have turned out to be bad advisers when it comes to organizing sustainable sources of income for designers, artists, musicians, writers and others in the ‘content’ business. The question whether computer programmers have the freedom to change code has been too long in the centre of attention. If we care about the so-called precarious creative workers we should shift our attention away from the professions that are (still) able to organize their own income (such as programmers and academics) and start to theorize the new digital labor conditions of the global creative classes and come up with viable alternatives...."

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New York: Tony Cragg at Marian Goodman Gallery through March 10, 2012

New York: Tony Cragg at Marian Goodman Gallery through March 10, 2012 | arslog | Scoop.it

"Tony Cragg’s latest body of work is currently on display at the Marian Goodman Gallery through March 10. The show consists of 15 of the sculptor’s pieces, all of which were made in the last five years utilizing a wide variety of materials including plywood, bronze, and stone. Accompanying this exhibition are several large-scale pieces by the artist in The Sculpture Garden at 590 Madison Avenue...."

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Ziwon Wang: The Sculptural Stages Of Cyborg Life

Ziwon Wang: The Sculptural Stages Of Cyborg Life | arslog | Scoop.it

"In his work, Ziwon Wang questions human identity in a technologically evolving world. Like fellow sculptor Seong-Woon Shim, Wang expresses his ideas about the inevitable marriage of human and mechanical forms.

While Shim builds external mechanical extensions of the human body, Wang’s work conveys the internalization of technology, yielding partly organic, partly robotic beings reminiscent of Chris Cunningham’s imagery for Björk’s “All Is Full Of Love,” and the seminal manga/anime franchise Ghost In The Shell...." - Jangmin Choi

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Vinyl Rally, record's racing

Vinyl Rally, record's racing | arslog | Scoop.it

"A common issue in presenting experimental music and sound art is finding an effective way to share with the audience the fun of exploring unconventional uses of musical objects. Reinventing, hacking and sometimes destroying instruments, playback devices and other media can provide a good deal of fun, but perhaps due to the gritty, harsh and uncontrolled output these activities tend to generate, their playfulness can be underestimated. In his latest work Vinyl Rally) Lucas Abela pitches together two apparently opposed situations. A physical arcade game where visitors drive remote controlled cars around a large scale racing track is combined with techniques of noise making derived from experimental turntablism. Enlarging an idea already proposed in works such as Yuri Suzuki’s Sound Chaser or Staalplaat Soundsystem’s Yokomono, Abela uses..." - Matteo Marangoni

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Bioconservatives vs. Bioprogressives - Reason Magazine

Bioconservatives vs. Bioprogressives - Reason Magazine | arslog | Scoop.it

Opposition to the technologies that make life longer, healthier, and happier creates strange bedfellows.

The Body Politic: The Battle Over Science in America, by Jonathan D. Moreno, Bellevue Literary Press, 224 pages, $18.95

"We are now living in the age of biopolitics, claims University of Pennsylvania bioethicist Jonathan Moreno in his new book The Body Politic: The Battle Over Science in America. “Biopolitics is the nonviolent struggle for control over the actual and imagined achievements of the new biology and the new world it symbolizes,” he writes. “The stakes are about as big as they can get.” Moreno is right.

Our biopolitical and bioethical struggles span human concerns from birth to death. Should embryos be tested genetically in vitro, allowing parents to implant only those they choose? What about using embryos to produce stem cells that can be transformed into tissues to repair damaged hearts and brains? Is it OK to create mice endowed with human brain cells? When is it appropriate to halt medical care for people who show no signs of minimal consciousness?"


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Computational Origami by MIT’s Erik Demaine

Computational Origami by MIT’s Erik Demaine | arslog | Scoop.it

"Brain Pickings is all about the cross-pollination of ideas across disciplinary boundaries. We have a particularly soft spot for the interplay of art and mathematics — from Anatolii Fomenko’s vintage mathematical impressions to Vy Hart’s playful mathematics to Benoît Mandelbrot’s legendary fractals. So we love the work of MIT father-and-son duo Erik and Martin Demaine. In this wonderful presentation from MoMA’s now-legendary 2008 Design and the Elastic Mind exhibition, Erik reveals the extraordinary computational origami he has developed with his father, MIT’s first artist in residence...."

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TEDxMarrakesh - Hans Ulrich Obrist - The Art of Curating

"Hans Ulrich Obrist is Co-director of the Serpentine Gallery in London. Prior to this he was Curator of the Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris from 2000 to 2006, as well as curator of Museum in progress, Vienna, from 1993 to 2000. Obrist has co-curated over 250 exhibitions since his first exhibition, the Kitchen show (World Soup) in 1991 to 1994; Take Me, I'm Yours, 1995; Manifesta 1, 1996; Laboratorium, 1999; Cities on the Move, 1997; Live/Life, 1996; Nuit Blanche, 1998; 1st Berlin Biennale, 1998; Utopia Station, 2003; 2nd Guangzhou Triennale, 2005; Dakar Biennale, 2004; 1st & 2nd Moscow Biennale, 2005 and 2007; Lyon Biennale, 2007; Yokohama Triennale, 2008 and Indian Highway, 2008-2011. Obrist has contributed to over 200 book projects, his recent publications include 'A Brief History of Curating', 'Everything You Always Wanted To Know About Curating But Were Afraid To Ask', The Conversation Series (Vol. 1-20.), 'Ai Weiwei Speaks' and 'Interviews Vol. 2'. He is also contributing editor of Abitare Magazine, Artforum, Paradis Magazine and 032c Magazine..."


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Small World in Motion Gallery

Small World in Motion Gallery | arslog | Scoop.it

"2011 Nikon Small World in Motion Winners

In response to the exciting new trend in digital photomicrography of recording movies or digital time-lapse photography through the microscope, Nikon Small World in Motion was created as a sister competition under the Nikon Small World brand. Movies are judged on the merit of being visually outstanding as well as depicting the intersection of science and art..."

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Rem Koolhaas to Build Marina Abramovic’s New Museum of Performance Art

"Marina Abramovic signed a deal with architect Rem Koolhaus earlier this week to design and construct her Center for the Preservation of Performance Art in Hudson, New York. The Serbian art superstar will seek to raise $8 million to pay for the project, she revealed Tuesday night to a group of art collectors at a panel at Manhattan's tony Core Club, and the museum will be devoted to performance art pieces of "six hours minimum." Some of them will go on for days.

Abramovic purchased a cavernous former tennis center “only two hours” from the city four years ago, with the intent to turn it into a museum and theater. But other projects put its development on hold, most notably the artist's 2010 Museum of Modern Art retrospective, “Marina Abramovic: The Artist Is Present,” in which she sat motionless for 700-plus hours. Now she’s ready to go forward, she told the collectors. She’s also meeting with Hudson's town mayor, she added, to advocate for construction of a hotel for art-world types and fans who head north..."

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Any Sufficiently Advanced Civilization is Indistinguishable from Nature

Any Sufficiently Advanced Civilization is Indistinguishable from Nature | arslog | Scoop.it

"In Western cultures, nature is a cosmological, primal ordering force and a terrestrial condition that exists in the absence of human beings. Both meanings are freely implied in everyday conversation. We distinguish ourselves from the natural world by manipulating our environment through technology. In What Technology Wants, Kevin Kelly proposes that technology behaves as a form of meta-nature, which has greater potential for cultural change than the evolutionary powers of the organic world alone.

With the advent of ‘living technologies’ [2], which possess some of the properties of living systems but are not ‘truly’ alive, a new understanding of our relationship to the natural and designed world is imminent. This change in perspective is encapsulated in Koert Van Mensvoort’s term ‘next nature’, which implies thinking ‘ecologically’, rather than ‘mechanically’. The implications of next nature are profound, and will shape our appreciation of humanity and influence the world around us."

 


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Electric Landscapes

Electric Landscapes | arslog | Scoop.it

"Gardens might soon be power plants, scaled up to whole landscapes generating domestic electricity. "With a tangle of bright red cables spilling out from among the plants' roots, this grass is wired to the hilt and produces electricity day and night," New Scientist reports. After all, there is "potential in harvesting electrons released among plant roots" in damp, conductive soil, and this "could eventually generate a significant portion of our domestic electricity needs, making juice that will be even greener than power from solar panels or wind turbines."

Researchers in the Netherlands have narrowed in not on trees or other charismatic megaflora—not future forests sparkling with electrical storms between branches—but on any plant "with shallow roots that thrives in damp or waterlogged soil where oxygen is scarce." More specifically, this means marsh grasses and reeds (though we read that "the technology should have particular appeal in Asia, where it could be used to turn millions of hectares of rice paddies into power stations").

The techniques under study in Holland currently involve a specially designed electrode that can harvest excess electricity from otherwise organic plantlife..."

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Seong-Woon Shim: Blurring The Line Between Man And Machine Through Sculpture

Seong-Woon Shim: Blurring The Line Between Man And Machine Through Sculpture | arslog | Scoop.it

"Seong-Woon Shim draws inspiration from his childhood experience of building plastic models. In his current work, one can also spy a hint of RPG games like Neon Genesis Evangelion, where humans hop onto gigantic robots which stride into the horizon. Each of Shim’s pieces resembles something you’d see in a big budget sci-fi production, and despite their immense size, each part is painstakingly detailed. Shim’s concepts derive from the marriage between humanity and robotics. Over time, sci-fi films and animation have seen robots increasingly evolving into human forms..." - Jangmin Choi

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Doug Aitken Will Turn Hirshhorn Into 360-Degree Screen

Doug Aitken Will Turn Hirshhorn Into 360-Degree Screen | arslog | Scoop.it

"As if Diller Scofidio + Renfro’s giant inflatable balloon set to rise (sometime) from its roof, Up-style, weren’t a sufficiently kinetic addition to the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington D.C., the institution announced in a press release yesterday that artist Doug Aitken will turn the building’s circular facade into an enormous 360-degreen screen for nearly two months this spring. For the multichannel projection “SONG 1″ (2012) — which will be on view from March 22 to May 13 — Aitken will use the building’s distinctive curving exterior wall as a screen for moving images streaming from 11 high-definition video projectors. While the images that will make up “SONG 1″ remain a mystery, they will be structured around the pop music classic “I Only Have Eyes for You,” new versions of which have been created especially for this project by Beck, LCD Soundsystem’s James Murphy and others...." — Benjamin Sutton

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Fred Eerdekens’ Shadow Typography Art

Fred Eerdekens’ Shadow Typography Art | arslog | Scoop.it

"Fred Eerdekens’ work combines shadows and and typography to create experimental artworks that lie somewhere between installation and sculpture. Each piece relies on the perfectly lit gallery space to create the visual tricks and the process of the work is revealed as viewers walk around and interact with the work...."

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The Lego Robotic Arm

The Lego Robotic Arm | arslog | Scoop.it

"Lego is one of those wonder toys that eternally captivates generations of children and adults and part of the reason is its versatility. It means while the kids get to grips with the fundamentals of basic construction, mum and dad can geek out by building a Lego Death Star. Although at $399 for the playset it’s not the cheapest hobby.

Not happy with conquering the markets of children’s toys, film merchandise and video gaming, now Lego has made the move into robotics with the Lego robotic arm, a prosthetic arm made entirely from Lego. And this piece is far from child’s play, utilizing Lego pneumatics and motors for that all-important wrist and elbow action..." - Kevin Holmes

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'Hijacking Natural Systems' by Jo Berry: Redefining Art Under the Microscope

"In a seamless blend of art and science, Jo Berry's cutting-edge project, Hijacking Natural Systems, explores beauty on a cellular level. Her innovative works are more than just pretty pictures: by highlighting cellular pharmacology, Berry and others hope to facilitate awareness and encourage the advancement of treatments for diabetes and obesity. “The project is celebrating the human body, the use of new technology, the collaboration between science and art,” she stated. “[It] also gives the public the opportunity to see art in a non-traditional setting.”

Certainly the artist did not embark on this foray into science unprepared: she spent six months researching the project, participating in practical research activities, and using fluorescence microscopy to study the pharmacology of drugs and receptors in living cells..."

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'Virtuality and the Art of Exhibition Curatorial Design for the Multimedial Museum' by Vince Dziekan

Full title: Virtuality and the Art of Exhibition: Curatorial Design for the Multimedial Museum

Auhor: Vince Dziekan

ISBN: 9781841504766

Published by: Intellect | Publication: January 2012

Price: £24.95/ $40

Binding: Paperback| Dimensions: 230x174

 

"The book examines how digital technologies are playing an increasingly important role in guiding the curatorial strategies of contemporary art museums. Designed around contextual studies of virtuality and the art of exhibition, this interdisciplinary volume applies practice-based research to a broad range of topics, including digital mediation, spatial practice, the multimedial museum, and curatorial design."

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Building Flowers

Building Flowers | arslog | Scoop.it

An architecture graduate constructs intricate botanical illustrations using the computer graphics programs intended to design buildings.

 

"What’s the difference between a 100-story skyscraper towering over a bustling metropolis and a 2-inch flower blooming in the countryside? To architecture-student-turned-artist Macoto Murayama, not a whole lot.

“[The flower] is organic and is rather different from architecture [in that way],” Murayama writes in an email (translated by Rodion Trofimchenko, a curator at the Frantic Gallery in Tokyo, Japan, where Murayama shows his work). “[But] when I looked closer into a plant that I thought was organic, I found in its form and inner structure, hidden mechanical and inorganic elements.”

Intrigued, Murayama began applying the computer graphics programs and techniques he had learned while studying architecture at Miyagi University of Education in Sendai to illustrate, in meticulous detail, the anatomy of flowers. After choosing a flower, purchased at the flower shop or picked up on the side of a road, he carefully dissects it, cutting off its petals with a scalpel and extracting the ovary and other internal structures. He then sketches what he sees, photographs it, and models it on the computer using 3dsMAX software, a program typically used by architects and animators. Finally, he creates a composition of the different parts in Photoshop, and uses Illustrator to add measurements and other labels..." - Jef Akst

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CultureLab: The unnatural art of synthetic biology

CultureLab: The unnatural art of synthetic biology | arslog | Scoop.it

Near the end of the new exhibit Synth-ethic at Vienna's Natural History Museum, visitors are encouraged to confide their anxieties about biotechnology to sculptures that are a twist on Guatemalan worry dolls. Instead of traditional materials, these tiny dolls are constructed from cultured tissue, making them "semi-living," according to the artists, Oron Catts and Ionat Zurr.


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IDENTITÄT Gives 3D Printed Form To Our Virtual Selves

IDENTITÄT Gives 3D Printed Form To Our Virtual Selves | arslog | Scoop.it

"Our digital identities are intangible things, occupying virtual space as we trawl around online, they’re our “second self” in the words of cybrog anthropologist Amber Case, our low-tech cyborg alter egos. It’s an identity that, while intangible, gets ported around with us on our portable electronic devices able to be summoned at the swipe of a touchscreen.

But how do you quantify this digital trail? Can it only be measured in terms of bytes or ghostly electronic remnants left behind by our online activities? IDENTITÄT from Berlin-based design practice Studio NAND aims to give some physical presence to this virtual data by visualizing personal raw data sets from 100,000 people to create a “gestalt of digital identity” for the users.

By analyzing raw data sets using custom tools—which ranged from music interests via Last.fm to shopping habits via Amazon, Twitter feeds and search habits—they created 3D sculptures by running the information through a software cocktail of Processing, toxiclibs, and Sunflow..."

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Switching Codes: Thinking Through Digital Technology in the Humanities and the Arts

Switching Codes: Thinking Through Digital Technology in the Humanities and the Arts | arslog | Scoop.it

Thomas Bartscherer, Roderick Coover - Switching Codes: Thinking Through Digital Technology in the Humanities and the Arts - 448 pages , University Of Chicago Press , 2011, English , ISBN: 978-0226038315


The communication problem between humanism and science (defined in the past as the "two cultures" problem) is not a recent one: even William Gibson, in the late eighties, was encouraging people to talk about the slash between humanism and science. This book is trying to focus on the topic using a new methodology. It's an edited collection of texts, but not just a mere anthology: it's intended as a dialogue among scholars, artists, and computer scientists, in printed form. The book is divided into four sections which all conclude with two responses, promoting a "conversation..."

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Steampunk Mask Fittings

Steampunk Mask Fittings | arslog | Scoop.it

"Designer Richard Symons is no stranger to the absurd. With a fascination of skulls, cyborgs, and steampunk culture, Symons brings some interesting handmade oddities.

The Techno Masks by Richard Symons, although peculiar, scream killer craftsmanship and attention to detail. Any huge fan of cyborgs and steampunk styling will love to own one of these pieces of art.

These are definitely some awesome creations, I just wouldn’t recommend wearing the Techno Masks by Richard Symons outside...."

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Undertaking Transmodern: At the Threshold of the Present Moment :: Call for Submissions — Deadline: April 1.

"The Transmodern Performance Festival cordially invites you to submit scores, ideas, images, essays, plays, poems, parlor games, recipes, instructions for a performance, etc. for a publication on the theme of TRANSmodern. This publication will work as a collection of musings on the state of being “trans” (as in transcendent, transgressive, translated, transmogrified, transgender, transient, etc.) in today’s cultural and political landscape. We are attempting to define and expand upon these concepts through variant media and disciplines. By approaching these fascinating and complex theories from an array of diverse fields and methods we will more adequately represent the multifarious nature of these theories. The Transmodern Performance Festival is constructing a publication which considers its topic not solely through authoritative textual statements but through the visual and the musical — the questioning and the suggesting..."

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