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Contemporary Art, Science, Technology
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Neuroscience is about discovering our limits, then hacking to get around them |

Neuroscience is about discovering our limits, then hacking to get around them | | arslog | Scoop.it
Crockett, a neuroscientist at University College London and Oxford University, specialises in the neurological functions driving human morality and altruism. Which is not to say she's suggesting we find hacks to get around being moral, altruistic beings, but rather hacks that help make us better at doing the right thing.
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Boy gets prosthetic hand made by 3-D printer

Boy gets prosthetic hand made by 3-D printer | arslog | Scoop.it
“ Two years ago, Paul McCarthy began searching for an inexpensive yet functional prosthetic hand for his son Leon, who was born without fingers on one of his h...”
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3-D data visualization | #cyborgs

3-D data visualization | #cyborgs | arslog | Scoop.it
“ For graduate student Deven Vignali of Libby, the three-dimensional data visualization center at Montana Tech has made his life easier.”
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Robotic Insect Eyes Destined for Next-Gen Micro Drones - IEEE Spectrum

Robotic Insect Eyes Destined for Next-Gen Micro Drones - IEEE Spectrum | arslog | Scoop.it
“ This flexible new camera can see even better than bugs do (Robotic Insect Eyes Destined for Next-Gen Micro Drones - IEEE Spectrum http://t.co/hOew4oPXKO via @IEEESpectrum)...”
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BIO-SENSING ART in the 1970s - Data Garden interviews: bio-art pioneer Richard Lowenberg

BIO-SENSING ART in the 1970s - Data Garden interviews: bio-art pioneer Richard Lowenberg | arslog | Scoop.it

Artist and eco-systems designer Richard Lowenberg discusses his pioneering efforts in bio-sensing art and his proposition for a slow-tech movement.

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George M. Church, "Regenesis: How Synthetic Biology Will Reinvent Nature and Ourselves", Ed Regis: Books

Regenesis: How Synthetic Biology Will Reinvent Nature and Ourselves

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Regenesis: How Synthetic Biology Will Reinvent Nature and Ourselves [George M. Church,Ed Regis] on Amazon.com. *FREE* super saver shipping on qualifying offers.

Imagine a future in which human beings have become immune to all viruses, in which bacteria can custom-produce everyday items, like a drinking cup, or generate enough electricity to end oil dependency. Building a house would entail no more work than planting a seed in the ground. These scenarios may seem far-fetched, but pioneering geneticist George Church and science writer Ed Regis show that synthetic biology is bringing us ever closer to making such visions a reality.
 
In Regenesis, Church and Regis explorethe possibilities—and perils—of the emerging field of synthetic biology. Synthetic biology, in which living organisms are selectively altered by modifying substantial portions of their genomes, allows for the creation of entirely new species of organisms. Until now, nature has been the exclusive arbiter of life, death, and evolution; with synthetic biology, we now have the potential to write our own biological future. Indeed, as Church and Regis show, it even enables us to revisit crucial points in the evolution of life and, through synthetic biological techniques, choose different paths from those nature originally took.
Via Gerd Moe-Behrens
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n-Polytope, Behaviors in Light and Sound after Iannis Xenakis

n-Polytope, Behaviors in Light and Sound after Iannis Xenakis | arslog | Scoop.it

«A few days ago, Chris Salter, along with his collaborators Sofian Audry, Marije Baalman, Adam Basanta, Elio Bidinost and Thomas Spier, premiered n-Polytope, Behaviors in Light and Sound after Iannis Xenakis at LABoral Art and Industrial Creation Centre in Gijón, Spain.

The cutting-edge light and sound environment is an homage to Iannis Xenakis' Polytopes which at the time of their development (1960s-1970s) were regarded as pioneering and radical. Reading articles about the Polytopes, you realize that many of the concepts and structures used to describe them are part of today's new media art and interaction design language: large-scale "multimedia performances", "immersive architectural environments", etc. Xenakis' Polytopes were live performances that merged electronic sound, light shows, and temporary structures. They made the indeterminate and chaotic patterns and behavior of natural phenomena experiential through the temporal dynamics of light and the spatial dynamics of sound. But as ground-breaking as they sound, the polytopes are still relatively unknown...» - Regine

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0h!m1gas, biomimetic surveillance for scratching

0h!m1gas, biomimetic surveillance for scratching | arslog | Scoop.it

«Relationships between art and nature have been proposed for a long time – although they mostly function on an aesthetic level. The work of Kuai Shen, however, goes far beyond classical observations. His installation 0h!m1gas makes both artistic and scientific advances - creating a closed environment, an artificial ecosystem, defined as "biomimetics stridulation", where a colony of ants lives subjected to video and sound surveillance. The engine of the project is biomimetics, a tool already used for science research and an emerging practice in the art world. Its functioning is based on the observation of nature with the aim of reproducing observed structures. The movement of ants, played by a digital matrix, turns over two vinyl records, which in turn generate sounds surprisingly similar to those produced by the insects. Working as a Dj collective, the ants scratch unconsciously inside a sound system that...» - Benedetta Sabatini

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Leonardo Electronic Almanac / Volume 5, No. 10 / October 1997

Leonardo Electronic Almanac / Volume 5, No. 10 / October 1997 | arslog | Scoop.it
UC Berkeley, Department of Art Practice – Assistant Professor in New Genres ANNOUNCEMENTS Seventh Annual Florida Electroacoustic Music Festival Leonardo Music Journal, Vol. 8 (1998) – Theme: "Ghosts and ...

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Type + Code: Processing For Designers

By Yeohyun Ahn and Viviana Cordova. Type + Code, explores the aesthetic of experimental code driven typography, with an emphasis on the programming language Processing which was created by Casey Reas and Ben Fry.

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New Museum Preserves “Extinct” Noises

New Museum Preserves “Extinct” Noises | arslog | Scoop.it

«Growing up, I had a cockatiel that could mimic the bleeping cacophony of a dial-up connection with dead accuracy. I never stopped to think that my bird (still alive) preserves a valuable trace of our pre-broadband heritage. Just like Boa Sr, Thud the cockatiel could be the last “speaker” of an otherwise forgotten set of sounds.

Stepping into the void of noise is Brendan Chilcutt’s Museum of Endangered Sounds. This online repository preserves defunct sounds as diverse as a Nokia ring tone, a fax machine and the preloaded game that came with Encarta encyclopedia. Rich in memory and resonance to members of a certain generation, these noises are a mere curiosity to younger people. “Curiosity” might even be a strong term. Without any cultural connections, the majority of these sounds have no intrinsic interest.

The museum skews towards technologies created within the last 20 years. It...»

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Rescooped by arslog from Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s)
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Digital Snow - Michael Snow and Anarchive - Daniel Langlois Foundation and Époxy Communications

Digital Snow - Michael Snow and Anarchive - Daniel Langlois Foundation and Époxy Communications | arslog | Scoop.it

The DVD-Rom anarchive 2: Digital Snow was co-produced in 2002 by the Daniel Langlois Foundation and Époxy Communications. From June 2011 to February 2012, with permission from Michael Snow and Anne-Marie Duguet (anarchive), the Daniel Langlois Foundation has transposed Digital Snow to the Web


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Interview with James Archer of Anatomy Blue

Interview with James Archer of Anatomy Blue | arslog | Scoop.it

«With an MA in Biomedical Communication from UT Southwestern and tremendous experience in the medical illustration/animation scene, James Archer is particularly sought after for his artistic style and approach to work. His 3D medical illustrations captivate the viewer with their diffuse lighting, organic hues, intimate depth of field, and overall softness that make anatomy and science look almost poetic.

I had the opportunity to work with James on a medical animation project recently and for someone with such a high standard of detail and execution, he’s an extremely laid back guy. He’s also impressively nonchalant about his incredible talent. I caught up with James after our project to uncover more about his background, technique, and cool personality...»

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Digital literacy and informal learning environments: an introduction

Digital literacy and informal learning environments: an introduction | arslog | Scoop.it
New technologies and developments in media are transforming the way that individuals, groups and societies communicate, learn, work and govern. This new socio-technical reality requires participants to possess not only skills and abilities related to the use of technological tools, but also knowledge regarding the norms and practices of appropriate usage. To be ‘digitally literate’ in this way encompasses issues of cognitive authority, safety and privacy, creative, ethical, and responsible use and reuse of digital media, among other topics. A lack of digital literacy increasingly implicates one's full potential of being a competent student, an empowered employee or an engaged citizen. Digital literacy is often considered a school-based competency, but it is introduced and developed in informal learning contexts such as libraries, museums, social groups, affinity spaces online, not to mention the home environment. This article recognizes and connects the ways and places we might conceptualize and realize an expanded view of digital literacy that fits today's changing reality.(2013). Digital literacy and informal learning environments: an introduction. Learning, Media and Technology: Vol. 38, Digital Literacy and Informal Learning Environments, pp. 355-367.
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Michio Kaku: The Universe in a Nutshell

The Universe in a Nutshell: The Physics of Everything Michio Kaku, Henry Semat Professor of Theoretical Physics at CUNY What if we could find one single equa...
Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
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PARAMETRIC SEMIOLOGY

PARAMETRIC SEMIOLOGY | arslog | Scoop.it
“ Harvard GSD | Fall 2013 | Studio Patrik Schumacher & Marc Fornes”
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Lectures by Gilles Deleuze: Theory of Multiplicities in Bergson

Lectures by Gilles Deleuze: Theory of Multiplicities in Bergson | arslog | Scoop.it
... I wanted to propose to you an investigation [recherche] into the history of a word, a still very partial, very localized history. That word is “multiplicity.” There is a very current use of multiplicity: for example, I say: a multiplicity of numbers, a multiplicity of acts, a multiplicity of states of consciousness, a multiplicity of shocks [ébranlements]. Here “multiplicity” is employed as a barely nominalized adjective. And it's true that Bergson often expressed himself thus. But at other times, the word “multiplicity” is employed in the strong sense, as a true substantive, thus, from the second chapter of Time and Free Will onward, the number is a multiplicity, which does not mean the same thing at all as a multiplicity of numbers. Why do we feel that this use of multiplicity, as a substantive, is at once unusual and important? (The concept of multiplicity, Time and Free Will 224-26) It's because, so long as we employ the adjective multiple, we only think a predicate that we necessarily place in a relation of opposition and complementarity with the predicate ONE: the one and the multiple, the thing is one or multiple, and it's even one and multiple. On the contrary, when we employ the substantive multiplicity, we already indicate thereby that we have surpassed [dépassé] the opposition of predicates one/multiple, that we are already set up on a completely different terrain, and on this terrain we are necessarily led to distinguish types of multiplicity. In other words, the very notion of multiplicity taken as a substantive implies a displacement of all of thought: for the dialectical opposition of the one and the multiple, we substitute the typological difference between multiplicities. And this is exactly what Bergson does: throughout all his work he continually denounces the dialectic as an abstract thought, as a false movement that goes from one opposite to the other, from the one to the multiple and from the same to the one, but which thus always lets the essence of the thing escape, that is the how many, the poson [Greek term for “how much”]. That's why in chapter three of Creative Evolution he will reject the question: is élan vital one or multiple? For élan vital is like duration, it's neither one nor multiple, it's a type of multiplicity. Even further: the predicates one and multiple depend upon the notion of multiplicity, and only agree precisely with the other type of multiplicity, that is to say with the multiplicity that is distinguished from that of duration or élan vital: “Abstract unity and abstract multiplicity are determinations of space or categories of the understanding” (Creative Evolution 280-81)...
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The Bowooss Bionic Inspired Research Pavilion

The Bowooss Bionic Inspired Research Pavilion | arslog | Scoop.it

«The School of Architecture at Saarland University in Saarbrücken, Germany, have lead a collaborative research project into bionic inspired wooden shell structures. They have designed and built a temporary pavilion, inspired by the material-efficient construction methods found in nature.» - by Dave 

 

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Industrial landscapes of the future/past: DataisNature and the work of Paul Prudence

Industrial landscapes of the future/past: DataisNature and the work of Paul Prudence | arslog | Scoop.it

«Algorithms only really come alive in the temporal time-frames that they move through. Their existence depends on being able to move freely along time's arrow, unfolding and expanding out in to the universe, or reversing themselves backwards into a finite point. Every form and structure that the universe creates is the result of a single step along that pathway and we're only ever observing it at a single moment. Those geological steps can take millions of years to unfold and we can only ever really look back and see the steps that happened before we chose to observe them. Computational algorithms break down that slow dripping of nature's possibilities and allow us to become time-travellers, stepping into any point that we choose to.

Paul Prudence is a performer and installation artist who works with computational, algorithmic and generative environments, developing ways to reflect his interest in patterns, nature and the mid-way point between scientific research and artistic pursuit. The outputs from this research are near cinematic, audio-visual events. Prudence's creative work, and his blog, Dataisnature (kept since October 2004), explores a number of creative potentials as well as documentating the creative and scientific research work of others that he finds of interest...» - By Mark Hancock

 

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Book Review: "Sound", edited by Caleb Kelly, Whitechapel Gallery

Book Review: "Sound", edited by Caleb Kelly, Whitechapel Gallery | arslog | Scoop.it

«There seems to be a kind of sub-genre in sound art books: the anthology of historical texts. Perhaps because sound art is still a hybrid which lacks a well defined and acknowledged identity, this attitude towards compiling selections of important texts from renowned artists and musicians seems quite peculiar. Somehow it feels like a huge effort to be exhaustive and consistent, as with a comprehensive CD box collection that tries summarize a whole genre concept or time period in a limited space. That said, the selection made by famous sound art critic Caleb Kelly is definitively worthy and includes contributions from philosophers, curators and scholars. The unavoidability and physicality of sound emerges overbearingly through the texts, as well as plenty of fascinating perspectives on the simple yet multifaceted act of listening. The exponential production of sounds and noise and our ability to define...»

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The Tanks at Tate Modern by Herzog & de Meuron

The Tanks at Tate Modern  by Herzog & de Meuron | arslog | Scoop.it
Architects Herzog & de Meuron have uncovered three underground concrete tanks at the Tate Modern gallery in London to create new spaces for art and performance, which open this week (+ slideshow).

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39 New Scientific Concepts That Everyone Should Understand

39 New Scientific Concepts That Everyone Should Understand | arslog | Scoop.it

The editors over at Edge.orgasked some of the most influential thinkers in the world — including neuroscientists, physicists and mathematicians — what they believe are the most important scientific concepts of the modern era.The result is "This Will make You Smarter: New Scientific Concepts To Improve Your Thinking," a compilation of nearly 200 essays exploring concepts such as the "shifting baseline syndrome" and a scientific view of "randomness."

We've highlighted 39 of the concepts here, crediting the author whose essay highlights the theory.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/scientific-concepts-from-this-will-make-you-smarter-2012-6?op=1#ixzz20lnQ9Spd


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Humans, Animals, and Robots: A Phenomenological Approach to Human-Robot Relations

This paper argues that our understanding of many human-robot relations can be enhanced by comparisons with human-animal relations and by a phenomenological approach which highlights the significance of how robots appear to humans. Some potential gains of this approach areexplored by discussing the concept of alterity, diversity and change in human-robot relations, Heidegger’s claim that animals are ‘poor in world’, and the issue of robot-animal relations. These philosophical reflections result in a perspective on human-robot relations that may guide robot design and inspire more empirical human-robot relations research that is sensitive to how robots appear to humans in different contexts at different times.


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Book review - The Art of Not Making: The New Artist / Artisan Relationship

Book review - The Art of Not Making: The New Artist / Artisan Relationship | arslog | Scoop.it

«Publisher Thames & Hudson writes: Can an artist claim that an object is a work of art if it has been made for him or her by someone else? If so, who is the 'author' of such a work? And just what is the difference between a work of art and a work of craft?

The Art of Not Making tackles these questions head on, exploring the concepts of authorship, artistic originality, skill, craftsmanship and the creative act, and highlighting the vital role that skills from craft and industrial production play in the creation of some of today's most innovative and sought-after works of art.

Michael Petry presents the art of over 115 contemporary artists - including Takashi Murakami, Matthew Barney, Tony Cragg, Cornelia Parker, Grayson Perry, Ai Weiwei, Daniel Buren and Carsten Höller - all of whom have one thing in common: they do not always make their own work. Instead, they often either employ others to produce it on their behalf, or appropriate objects made by someone else. Original interviews with the artists and artisans offer insights into this creative collaboration, which often produces works breathtaking in their scope and ambition.

Painters of the Renaissance did it, Damien Hirst does it and so does Takashi Murakami. Marcel Duchamp became one of the most influential artists in history for doing it. Each of these artists rely on external assistance to 'do their job.' Some have an idea for an artwork and entrust an assistant or the expert of another discipline or craft to actually make the whole piece. Others delegate only part of the process. We know that. Yet, in the mind of the public, the artist is still this individual of great mind, impeccable dexterity and expertise who's behind every single element of his work.

Interestingly, Michael Petry draws parallels with cinema. A film is the result of a collaborative effort between actors, technicians, assistants, writers, etc. Yet, we never question the fact that it is the film director who is credited as the maker of the film.

Petry believes that the rise in this partnership between the artist and the artisan is partly due to the return in favour of a highly crafted aesthetic in art, an aesthetic that...» - Michael Petry

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From Tribes to Digital Networks

From Tribes to Digital Networks | arslog | Scoop.it

«...Organizational complexity is defined as the amount of differentiation that exists within different elements constituting the organization. This is often operationalized as the number of different professional specializations that exist within the organization. For example, a school would be considered a less complex organization than a hospital, since a hospital requires a large diversity of professional specialties in order to function. Organizational complexity can also be observed via differentiation in structure, authority and locus of control, and attributes of personnel, products, and technologies. Contingency theory states that an organization structures itself and behaves in a particular manner as an attempt to fit with its environment. Thus organizations are more or less complex as a reaction to environmental complexity. An organization’s environment may be complex because it is turbulent, hostile, diverse, technologically complex, or restrictive. An organization may also be complex as a result of the complexity of its underlying technological core. For example, a nuclear power plant is likely to have a more complex organization than a standard power plant because the underlying technology is more difficult to understand and control. There are numerous consequences of environmental and organizational complexity. Organizational members, faced with overwhelming and/or complex decisions, omit, tolerate errors, queue, filter, abstract, use multiple channels, escape, and chunk in order to deal effectively with the complexity. At an organizational level, an organizational will...»

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