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Contemporary Art, Science, Technology
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Rescooped by arslog from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
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Are Interactive Films Transforming Modern Storytelling? Sundance's New Frontier Has the Answer

Are Interactive Films Transforming Modern Storytelling? Sundance's New Frontier Has the Answer | arslog | Scoop.it

 

Sean Flynn:  "Will any of these experiments in storytelling become the dominant forms of tomorrow? Or are they merely timely novelties whose relevance is tied up with the technologies that enable them?"


Via The Digital Rocking Chair
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Henrik Safegaard - Cloneartist's curator insight, January 29, 2014 6:44 AM

A festival still steeped in the established art of cinema, the question inevitably arises: Will any of these experiments in storytelling transcend the category of “first word art” and become the dominant forms of tomorrow? Or are they merely timely novelties whose relevance is tied up with the technologies that enable them?


Click to watch videos and read more.

The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, January 30, 2014 12:41 PM


Sean Flynn:  "Will any of these experiments in storytelling become the dominant forms of tomorrow? Or are they merely timely novelties whose relevance is tied up with the technologies that enable them?"

Rescooped by arslog from Cyborgs_Transhumanism
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#Robots with "soul" | #posthumanism

What kind of robots does an animator / jazz musician / roboticist make? Playful, reactive, curious ones. Guy Hoffman shows demo film of his family of unusual robots -- including two musical bots that like to jam with humans.

Via Claude Emond, luiy
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Claude Emond's curator insight, January 19, 2014 10:46 AM

Real robots enjoying music and interacting with the public. Very cool. Shape of things to come in posthumanity :)

Claude Emond's comment, January 19, 2014 5:40 PM
Bienvenu, Luis
luiy's comment, January 19, 2014 5:41 PM
Thanks Claude,
Rescooped by arslog from Chair et Métal - L'Humanité augmentée
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Soft pneumatic exoskeleton could be perfect for use in rehab

Soft pneumatic exoskeleton could be perfect for use in rehab | arslog | Scoop.it
We've recently been hearing a lot about how exoskeletons can be used in rehabilitation. The problem is, most exoskeletons are rigid. A team of scientists ar...

Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
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Rescooped by arslog from Science & Transhumanisme
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La technologisation du corps

La technologisation du corps | arslog | Scoop.it
“ Ce n'est plus de la science fiction, les robots sont partout dans notre vie quotidienne jusqu'à transformer nos corps. C'est une réelle révolution dans la conception du corps humain.”
Via Alliance VITA
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Rescooped by arslog from Tracking the Future
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Brainlike Computers, Learning From Experience

Brainlike Computers, Learning From Experience | arslog | Scoop.it

Computers have entered the age when they are able to learn from their own mistakes, a development that is about to turn the digital world on its head.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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VendorFit's curator insight, December 31, 2013 3:27 PM

Artificial intelligence is the holy grail of technological achievment, creating an entity that can learn from its own mistakes and can (independently of programmer intervention) develop new routines and programs.  The New York Times claims that the first ever "learning" computer chip is to be released in 2014, an innovation that has profound consequences for the tech market.  When these devices become cheaper, this should allow for robotics and device manufacture that incorporates more detailed sensory input and can parse real objects, like faces, from background noise. 

Laura E. Mirian, PhD's curator insight, January 10, 2014 1:16 PM

The Singularity is not far away

Rescooped by arslog from Augmented Collective Intelligence
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Collective intelligence: an interview with Pierre Levy | Masters of Media

"Levy is currently working on a research program, called IEML (Information Economy Meta Language). IEML is a metalanguage and proposes itself as the language of collective intelligence. As a metalanguage it differs fundamentally from natural languages we know. This can be best understood in the way it is conceived. Natural languages are, in the first place, the results of a process of documenting the spoken word. A metalanguage is artificial and is a result of formalizing ideas, instead of words. The practice of formalizing ideas in a universally adopted metalanguage is well established in the realm of natural sciences. For centuries now, ideas are being documented in terms of formulas, numbers, equations, molecules etc. There is a finite, well structured toolset at the hands of every natural scientist. "


Via Pierre Levy, juandoming, luigi vico, Howard Rheingold
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luiy's curator insight, December 19, 2013 4:30 PM

The scientific revolution in the human sciences will culminate in collective intelligence, a common good which will throttle human development. In a recent book, Levy proposed a “loose IEML model” to monitor the coordination of human development. The axis of human development are defined by “education, health, sustainable economic prosperity, security, human rights, conservation and enrichment of cultural heritage, environmental balance, scientific and technical innovation” which are in accordance with the United Nations Development Program, Levy assures me. I wondered whether a metalanguage which positions itself functionally as neutral (as opposed to Berners Lee universal ontology) should contain assumptions on how western democratic society is structured to which Levy partly agrees that any metalanguage can’t be neutral:

 

There can be a lot of disagreements about the right ways or methods to improve human development. IEML, as a universal semantic code, can accomodate any method. Above all, IEML provides a common semantic sphere where all disciplines of human sciences can compare their theories and methods and can coordinate their findings at the service of human development. (…) Now, you can say: “Okay, but what if I am against improving health and education because these are western values and / or it has been used to justify western imperialism”. My response is: “It’s up to you!” In general, I do not think that any theory or metalangage can be neutral. Every act, being practical or theoretical, occurs in a hypercomplex context and has an effect on this context. I do not claim any impossible neutrality or objectivity. The objection “you’re not neutral” is besides the point. I have a very precise goal. My aim is to improve human development, collective intelligence and knowledge management in the humanities.

Howard Rheingold's curator insight, December 20, 2013 1:06 PM

Pierre Levy has been thinking about augmented collective intelligence for a long time. How can the disparate pieces of knowledge contributed by myriad online postings in blogs, question and answer sites, Twitter, etc. be connected in various automatic frameworks? Levy believes a metalanguage (HTML can be seen as a metalanguage) is need. 

Patricia Soumarmon's curator insight, December 22, 2013 7:50 AM

Levy... ou la difficulté d'être (trop) en avance sur son temps...

Rescooped by arslog from Cinema Zeal
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Akira Kurosawa to Ingmar Bergman: “A Human Is Not Really Capable of Creating Really Good Works Until He Reaches 80”

Akira Kurosawa to Ingmar Bergman: “A Human Is Not Really Capable of Creating Really Good Works Until He Reaches 80” | arslog | Scoop.it
In July of 1988, Ingmar Bergman—retired from film—turned 70. He had every reason to believe that his best work lay behind him. After all, he had won three Academy Awards (and the Irving G.

Via Xaos
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Rescooped by arslog from Cyborgs_Transhumanism
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#Singularity University plots hi-tech future for humans I #transhumanism

#Singularity University plots hi-tech future for humans I #transhumanism | arslog | Scoop.it
Rob Nail walks into the room looking like a Silicon Valley Doctor Who as played by David Tennant - tailored suit, 3D-printed trainers and the Californian twist on the sonic screwdriver, Google Glass. But despite spending most of his days predicting what the future will look like, he doesn't want to become a time lord. "I feel more like a robot," says the chief executive of the Singularity University (SU). He thinks that the gap between humans and robots is closing as biology and silicon increasingly collide. He reels off examples. Bionic eyes that combine a Google Glass device with a tiny electrode in the retina and will be available in the US for partially-sighted people in a few weeks' time. It is only a matter of time before they filter down to the wider public. "Useful for pilots.," he says. He describes apps for the next-generation Google Glass that will allow users to read the heat maps of people's faces to tell if someone is lying or not. "They will either be banned or become a must-have in the world's boardrooms." And the first re-engineered human is not far off, either. "It will come within the next year, probably initially to offset some disease," he predicts. "If you want to be at the head of the class in future you are going to have to be enhanced," he says matter-of-factly.
Via Wildcat2030, luiy
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Rescooped by arslog from Machinimania
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Meet The Virtual Headset That Uses Your Eye As A Screen - Forbes

Meet The Virtual Headset That Uses Your Eye As A Screen - Forbes | arslog | Scoop.it
“ Meet The Virtual Headset That Uses Your Eye As A Screen Forbes Also, its “Virtual Retina Display” uses reflected light, which the human eye is best suited to looking at for extended periods, rather than the emitted light we strain to see every day...”
Via Dulcie Mills, Henrik Safegaard - Cloneartist
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Rescooped by arslog from Chair et Métal - L'Humanité augmentée
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Bionic Implant to Treat Mental Disorders in Development

Bionic Implant to Treat Mental Disorders in Development | arslog | Scoop.it
Scientists are developing the first bionic implant that will help treat mental disorders. Over the next three years Professor Xu-Feng Huang and his researchers from the University of Wollongong in Australia will lead the development of a bionic implant which will mitigate the symptoms of schizophrenia.
Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
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Rescooped by arslog from Post-Sapiens, les êtres technologiques
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PostHuman: An Introduction to Transhumanism

We investigate three dominant areas of transhumanism: super longevity, super intelligence and super wellbeing, and briefly cover the ideas of thinkers Aubrey de Grey, Ray Kurzweil and David Pearce.
Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
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Rescooped by arslog from Bionic City™
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Synthetic Biology and The Living City, Re:Work Cities Summit

Synthetic Biology and The Living City session from Re:Work Cities Summit, London, December 13th 2013.


Via Bionic City
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Bionic City's curator insight, January 16, 2014 5:06 PM

We are experiencing an unprecedented era in the history of urbanisation. How we manage the pace of urban growth will be one of the defining challenges of the 21st Century. How can sensor data, digital simulation, automated fabrication, augmented reality and synthetic biology create buildings and future cities that are more adaptive, regenerative, and alive?


Speakers: 

David Benjamin, Founding Principal, The Living; Melissa Sterry, Design Scientist & Futurist, Bionic City; Neil Spiller, Dean, School of Architecture, Design & Construction at University of Greenwich; Claudia Pasquero and Marco Poletto, Founders, ecoLogicStudio.

Rescooped by arslog from e.cloud
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Mini industrial robot arm turns your desk into a factory space

Mini industrial robot arm turns your desk into a factory space | arslog | Scoop.it
Become a mini tycoon of industry with the uArm industrial robot arm, sized to fit on your desk and do your bidding. Read this article by Amanda Kooser on CNET.

Via Alessio Erioli
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Rescooped by arslog from Post-Sapiens, les êtres technologiques
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▶ Aldous Huxley - The Ultimate Revolution (speech at Berkeley 1962)

Aldous Huxley, author of 'Brave New World', gives his speech "The Ultimate Revolution" at Cal Berkeley, 1962.
Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
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Rescooped by arslog from The New Global Open Public Sphere
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PLOS Biology: The Open Knowledge Foundation: Open Data Means Better Science

PLOS Biology: The Open Knowledge Foundation: Open Data Means Better Science | arslog | Scoop.it
Data provides the evidence for the published body of scientific knowledge, which is the foundation for all scientific progress. The more data is made openly available in a useful manner, the greater the level of transparency and reproducibility and hence the more efficient the scientific process becomes, to the benefit of society. This viewpoint is becoming mainstream among many funders, publishers, scientists, and other stakeholders in research, but barriers to achieving widespread publication of open data remain. The Open Data in Science working group at the Open Knowledge Foundation is a community that works to develop tools, applications, datasets, and guidelines to promote the open sharing of scientific data. This article focuses on the Open Knowledge Definition and the Panton Principles for Open Data in Science. We also discuss some of the tools the group has developed to facilitate the generation and use of open data and the potential uses that we hope will encourage further movement towards an open scientific knowledge commons.
Via Irina Radchenko, Pierre Levy
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Rescooped by arslog from Post-Sapiens, les êtres technologiques
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Hyping Artificial Intelligence, Yet Again

Hyping Artificial Intelligence, Yet Again | arslog | Scoop.it
Some advances are genuinely exciting, but whether they will really produce human-level A.I. is unclear.

Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
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Rescooped by arslog from Post-Sapiens, les êtres technologiques
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This Machine Can 3-D Scan Your Insides In A Single Heartbeat

This Machine Can 3-D Scan Your Insides In A Single Heartbeat | arslog | Scoop.it

You've never seen your organs like this before.

In a quarter of a second, this new CT scanner can take a perfect 3-D photo of your brain or heart. The underlying technology is nothing new, since CT scanners have been around for 40 years. But they’ve never been nearly this fast.

“It’s analogous to the shutter speed on a camera,” says Scott Schubert, general manager of premium CT at GE Healthcare, whose Revolution CT is now pending approval from the FDA. “The faster the shutter speed on a camera, the more you’re able to freeze moving objects.”


Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
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Rescooped by arslog from Digital Design and fabrication
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Can 3D printing mark a turning point in tissue engineering?

Can 3D printing mark a turning point in tissue engineering? | arslog | Scoop.it
3d printing tissue engineering

Via Growthobjects, Hassan Raza Balti
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Rescooped by arslog from Anthropology, communication & technology
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The Algorithms of Our Lives

The Algorithms of Our Lives | arslog | Scoop.it
Software has become a universal language, the interface to our imagination and the world. What electricity and the combustion engine were to the early 20th century, software is to the early 21st century. I think of it as a layer that permeates contemporary societies. If we want to understand today's techniques of communication, representation, simulation, analysis, decision making, memory, vision, writing, and interaction, we must understand software.
Via Pierre Levy, Andrea Naranjo
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Rescooped by arslog from Anthropology, communication & technology
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Software Studies: "Software is the Message" - new mini article (1000 words) from Lev Manovich

Software Studies: "Software is the Message" - new mini article (1000 words) from Lev Manovich | arslog | Scoop.it

Via Pierre Levy, Andrea Naranjo
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Rescooped by arslog from Amazing Science
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Processors That Work Like Brains Will Accelerate Artificial Intelligence

Processors That Work Like Brains Will Accelerate Artificial Intelligence | arslog | Scoop.it
A new breed of computer chips that operate more like the brain may be about to narrow the gulf between artificial and natural computation—between circuits that crunch through logical operations at blistering speed and a mechanism honed by evolution to process and act on sensory input from the real world. Advances in neuroscience and chip technology have made it practical to build devices that, on a small scale at least, process data the way a mammalian brain does. These “neuromorphic” chips may be the missing piece of many promising but unfinished projects in artificial intelligence, such as cars that drive themselves reliably in all conditions, and smartphones that act as competent conversational assistants.
Via Szabolcs Kósa, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by arslog from Post-Sapiens, les êtres technologiques
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inFORM - Interacting With a Dynamic Shape Display

“ inFORM is a Dynamic Shape Display that can render 3D content physically, so users can interact with digital information in a tangible way. inFORM can also interact…”
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Rescooped by arslog from DigitAG& journal
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Can evolution select for evolvability? | Machines Like Us

Can evolution select for evolvability? | Machines Like Us | arslog | Scoop.it
“ Evolution does not operate with a goal in mind; it does not have foresight. But organisms that have a greater capacity to evolve may fare better in rapidly changing environments. This raises the question: does evolution favor characteristics that increase a species' ability to evolve? For several years, biologists have attempted to provide evidence that natural selection has acted on evolvability. Now a new paper by University of Pennsylvania researchers offers, for the first time, clear evidence that the answer is yes. The senior author on the study, published in the journal PLOS Pathogens, is Dustin Brisson, an assistant professor in the School of Arts and Sciences' Department of Biology. His coauthors include Penn's Christopher J. Graves, Vera I. D. Ros and Paul D. Sniegowski, and the University of Kentucky's Brian Stevenson. ”"It's not controversial that populations evolve and that some traits are more apt to evolve than others," Brisson said. "What we were asking is whether the ability of an organism to evolve is a trait that natural selection can pick." “ .”
Via Wildcat2030, Andrea Graziano
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