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Contemporary Art, Science, Technology
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Rescooped by arslog from Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s)
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#Call - Collide@CERN​ / Ars Electronica​ @ CERN​ - deadline 23.06.2015

#Call - Collide@CERN​ / Ars Electronica​ @ CERN​ - deadline 23.06.2015 | arslog | Scoop.it

Following on from three highly successful years of partnership with Ars Electronica, Arts@CERN launches today the open call for Collide@CERN Ars Electronica, the award in which artists from any country are invited to apply for a residency of two months at CERN. This call is open for digital artists, innovative concepts and ideas in the field of art, science and technology.



Via Jacques Urbanska
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Isabelle Lefebvre's curator insight, May 4, 2015 5:39 AM

Résultat à suivre

 

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Brainlike Computers, Learning From Experience

Brainlike Computers, Learning From Experience | arslog | Scoop.it

Computers have entered the age when they are able to learn from their own mistakes, a development that is about to turn the digital world on its head.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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VendorFit's curator insight, December 31, 2013 3:27 PM

Artificial intelligence is the holy grail of technological achievment, creating an entity that can learn from its own mistakes and can (independently of programmer intervention) develop new routines and programs.  The New York Times claims that the first ever "learning" computer chip is to be released in 2014, an innovation that has profound consequences for the tech market.  When these devices become cheaper, this should allow for robotics and device manufacture that incorporates more detailed sensory input and can parse real objects, like faces, from background noise. 

Laura E. Mirian, PhD's curator insight, January 10, 2014 1:16 PM

The Singularity is not far away

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Graphene nanoribbons could be the savior of Moore’s Law

Graphene nanoribbons could be the savior of Moore’s Law | arslog | Scoop.it

With each new generation of microchips, transistors are being placed closer and closer together. This can only go on so long before there’s no more room to improve, or something revolutionary has to come along to change everything. One of the materials that might be the basis of that revolution is none other than graphene. Researchers at the University of California at Berkeley are hot on the trail of a form of so-called nanoribbon graphene that could increase the density of transistors on a computer chip by as much as 10,000 times.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Thierry Bodhuin's curator insight, February 18, 2014 4:10 AM

Moore's law may continue ... 

 

Yaroslav Writtle's curator insight, February 18, 2014 6:44 AM

Interesting stuff - wonder what could this mean for computing capacity 10 years down the line?

Benjamin Rees's curator insight, March 27, 2015 8:06 AM

For the past few decades, the concept of Moore's Law has proven to be relatively accurate in saying that the density of transistors able to be placed on an integrated circuit roughly doubles every two years. However, as transistors are manufactured to be placed increasingly close together, it can be foreseen that there will soon be no more room for improvement using current methods and materials. Recent developments in graphene technology may allow for more spatially efficient  circuits in the future, thereby continuing this trend of doubling transistor density.