Arrival Cities
Follow
Find
7.8K views | +0 today
Arrival Cities
being an immigrant or living in a "slum" is a feature not a bug
Curated by ddrrnt
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Ron Finley: A guerilla gardener in South Central LA

Ron Finley plants vegetable gardens in South Central LA -- in abandoned lots, traffic medians, along the curbs. Why? For fun, for defiance, for beauty and to offer some alternative to fast food in a community where "the drive-thrus are killing more people than the drive-bys."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Storied-places in a multispecies city [pdf]

ddrrnt's insight:

Random discovery.  But wow, I need to read more of this sometime.  Makes sense to me that animals would come to experience meaningful relations with the city.   

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

kolkata

kolkata | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

The slums of Kolkata can be divided into three groups: the older ones, up to 150 years’ old, in the heart of the city, are associated with early urbanization. The second group dates from the 1940s and 1950s and emerged as an outcome of industrialization-based rural–urban migration, locating themselves around industrial sites and near infra-structural arteries. The third group came into being after the independence of India and took vacant urban lands and areas along roads, canals and on marginal lands. In 2001, 1.5 million people, or one third of Kolkata’s population, lived in 2011 registered and 3500 unregistered slums.

 

Registered Slums (bustees): these slums are recognized by the Calcutta Municipal Corporation (CMC) on the basis of land title; since 1980, they have been taken over by the CMC for letting/lease to slum dwellers.

 

Unregistered slums: this comprises slums onthe land encroaching settlements.

 

The "bustee-type" generally has some form of secure tenure or ownership rights based on land rent or lease, with structures built by the slum dwellers, or house rental/lease of structures built by third parties.


Tenure security is, in principle, not available to the unregistered land encroaching settlements on road sides (jhupri), along canals (khaldhar) or on other vacant land (udbastu).


Over 40 per cent of Kolkata’s slum residents have been slum dwellers for two generations or longer, and more than half originate from the Kolkata hinterland. With the majority engaged in the informal sector, with average monthly earnings of between 500 and 1700 rupees and a household size of five to six persons, some three-quarters of the Kolkata slum population are below the poverty line.


This summary has been extracted from:

UN-Habitat (2003) Global Report on Human Settlements 2003, The Challenge of Slums, Earthscan, London; Part IV: 'Summary of City Case Studies', pp195-228.

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/dpu-projects/Global_Report/pdfs/Kolkata_bw.pdf

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Dakshinpuri: The Ninth Delhi: The Beginning

Dakshinpuri: The Ninth Delhi: The Beginning | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Dakshinpuri is a working class neighborhood in South Delhi, created during the Emergency in 1975 as part of a mass resettlement campaign of inner-city slum-dwellers to the outskirts of the city. This blog is about the history of Dakshinpuri, as reflected in the stories of its residents--stories about carving a neighborhood out of the wilderness, about urban demolition, water pumps, TV-centers and first electricity bills, about plot cards, bricks and bulldozers.


Dakshinpuri was created as part of the Emergency’s mass resettlement campaign of inner-city slum dwellers to the outskirts of Delhi. The displacement of about 120,000 families and the creation of 27 resettlement colonies, mostly on the periphery of the city, were part of the Emergency’s sweeping urban development plan to beautify and organize the city. According to Emma Tarlo, who cites a DDA (Delhi Development Authority) publication of the time, the demolitions and planting of trees were directly proportional: half a million people were resettled and half a million trees were planted. While Delhi’s poor was relocated to the vast wilderness surrounding Delhi, their former homes were being leveled and converted to parks, stadiums and shopping centers. (While sterilization was often a prerequisite for getting a plot card later on in the Emergency, in Dakshinpuri, which was mostly settled in the summer/monsoon months of 1975, it does not seem to have played a role in the resettlement process.) Dakshinpuri's primarily Dalit residents were given leases for 99 years--and for most, it was the first time they had ever legally owned land.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Out of India's Trash Heaps, More Than a Shred of Dignity

Out of India's Trash Heaps, More Than a Shred of Dignity | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
Pune, India, has developed a a waste-management approach that is improving the environment, as well as the livelihoods and social standing of some of the city’s poorest inhabitants.

 

Waste-pickers are often uneducated, rural migrants who sift through trash heaps or landfills, looking for plastics and glass that they sell to middlemen by weight, who send them to be recycled.  This informal system results in recycling rates of almost 50 percent for plastics (as compared with 8.2 percent in the United States) — which is why activists call waste-pickers “invisible environmentalists.”

 

Waste-picking is full of occupational hazards. Waste-pickers sifting through trash with bare hands encounter rusty metal, cut glass, needles and menstrual blood; their life expectancy may be a decade or more below the average. With a daily income of 60 rupees (one dollar) in Pune, most cannot afford proper meals or medical care. Police and security guards harass them, particularly women. Governments offers little protection.

It took years for K.K.P.K.P. to mobilize the waste-pickers, who were scattered and reluctant to take time off work for meetings. As the group came together, however, they found a sympathetic ear in the Pune Municipal Corporation (P.M.C.), the city’s governing body.

 

That led to the innovation that changed Chandani’s life and has evolved into a waste-management approach that others can learn from. In 2007, the K.K.P.K.P. and Pune’s government got together to create a cooperative called Solid Waste Collection and Handling (Swach). The idea was to engage waste-pickers to handle almost all of the city’s waste, a remarkable departure from other cities, where private contractors haul waste to landfills with trucks. The question was: Could Swach save the Pune government lots of money, improve the environment and improve livelihoods for some of the city’s poorest inhabitants? The answer appears to be yes to all three.

ddrrnt's insight:

thanks to @toughLoveforx :

https://plus.google.com/u/0/114944409106623979163/posts/eH1KYEBHppg

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Project brings development to Rio de Janeiro’s slums

Project brings development to Rio de Janeiro’s slums | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
With financing from the IDB, the Favela-Bairro project has helped more than 100 communities.

 

also see:

http://web.mit.edu/urbanupgrading/upgrading/case-examples/ce-BL-fav.html

 

"The Inter-American Development Bank funded this US$180 million “slum to neighborhood” project in 1995 in which it sought to integrate existing favelas into the fabric of the city through infrastructure upgrading and service increases. The project involves 253,000 residents in 73 communities. Key to the success of this large project was a committed and flexible city government and the use of intra- and extra-institutional partnerships with NGOs, the private sector, churches, and the general population. Especially instrumental was the use of grass-roots level infrastructure upgrading experts as project managers who could work easily with both the government and with the community members."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Cities Are the Future of Human Evolution

Cities Are the Future of Human Evolution | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
Humans began to live in urban settlements about 7 thousand years ago. As humans continued to evolve over the millennia, so too did our cities.

 

 

Now that the majority of humans live in cities, we're going to be confronting a new set of problems in urban life. For one thing, natural disasters in cities can cause much greater numbers of fatalities than in sparse, rural communities. So the cities of tomorrow will need to be robust against many kinds of disaster, from earthquakes and floods, to radiation bombardment. It's possible that many cities will built partly under ground, and partly under water. They might even be built inside a single building surrounded by farms. Not only will such structures allow us to conserve space, but layers of earth and water are excellent protection against radiation.

 

Many future-minded designers and architects believe that cities of the future will survive these kinds of disasters partly by changing the materials we use to build. Instead of dead trees, we'll use living ones, combined with genetically modified algae and other plants that could purify water and air, as well as provide energy. In a recent book,Rachel Armstrong has described what she calls "living architecture," where cities are built with semi-living materials that can repair their own cracks and heal themselves when damaged by a quake or just regular wear and tear. She proposes rescuing Venice from drowning by engineering a living reef underneath the city. It would be made with calcium-extruding protocells that latch onto the city's existing piles, strengthening them and attracting living creatures whose shells will eventually turn into a true ocean reef.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from Renew Cities: Economic Prosperity
Scoop.it!

Would You Move To A Shrinking City If It Paid Off Your Loans?

Would You Move To A Shrinking City If It Paid Off Your Loans? | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

"That’s the plan of New York’s Niagra Falls. In the hopes of staunching its population decline and bringing a new generation of engaged youth, the city is accepting applications for urban pioneers willing to move in exchange for a little debt relief."


Via Renew Cities
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Homesteading: Bringing self-reliance back

Homesteading: Bringing self-reliance back | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
Kimberly Coburn, who founded The Homestead Atlanta, explains why 'old-school' is making a comeback with the modern homesteading movement.

 

Is there a difference in curriculum for a folk school in a city compared to one serving more rural regions? 


To be honest, that's something we'll have to see moving forward. For the most part, no — sustainability and the ability to care for yourself with aesthetic integrity are of equal value whether you're living on 20 acres or in a high-rise. Of course, certain concessions have to be made and alternative approaches explored to compensate for the lack of time and space facing most urban dwellers, but what is lost in land availability is made up for by availability of resources and community. If, for instance, you took a beginning blacksmithing class with The Homestead Atlanta and really wanted to continue learning, there are a surprising number of forges scattered across the city. One significant difference I've noticed between urban and rural regions in terms of this kind of education is that many of the lost arts were never entirely lost in rural areas. Plenty of people — whether by choice or necessity — maintain a "fix it up, wear it out, make it do or do without" ethic while urban culture seems increasingly dependent on the temporary and the disposable. All the more reason, then, to offer education where it's needed most.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Connecting Citizens To Their Government By Turning It Into A Game

Connecting Citizens To Their Government By Turning It Into A Game | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

PlanIt is a game about the issues that face local government, designed to get people (especially young people) more involved and understanding of what goes in to managing their communities.

 

It works like this: A group--say, a planning commission or small business--puts up a few hundred dollars for community investment. Players register on the PlanIt platform, and take part in three "missions." To win pledgeable "coins," they complete "challenges" within each mission. Then the projects with the most pledged coins get real cash to spend.

 

About half the players so far have been under 18. Gordon says younger people add a lot of competitive spirit, and are important for encouraging others to play. "This is their first introduction to anything to do with civic engagement. They provide really meaningful input into these issues. And not only that, they also tend to motivate the adults."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Urban farmers join green revolution in South Africa

Urban farmers join green revolution in South Africa | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Urban farmers in Africa are increasingly being recognized as important contributors to the green sector.

 

... more small farmers are needed to make Africa self-sufficient, IFAD’s 2011 Rural Poverty Report stated. Although the farms are small, they must work efficiently as businesses.

 

“Smallholder farming can offer a route out of poverty for many,” IFAD President Kanayo Nwanze noted in his report, “but only if it is productive, commercially oriented and well-linked to modern markets.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

New York City Farm and Culinary Hotel Concept | Urban Gardens

New York City Farm and Culinary Hotel Concept | Urban Gardens | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

The Allotment, a hotel whose culinary focus makes growing and cooking food the fundamental ingredient of the guest experience.

 

A “grow, teach, eat, and share” idea that links the necessary hotel functions of sourcing, food production, cooking, and serving, the Allotment is composed of four distinct elements–a market, restaurant, rooftop urban farm, and an off-site experience where guests explore the city’s culinary offerings with the hotel’s chefs.

 

http://www.jovoto.com/projects/rethink-hotels/ideas/21873

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from 21st Century Parenting
Scoop.it!

Learning to Connect the Dots: Developing Children’s Systems Literacy

Learning to Connect the Dots: Developing Children’s Systems Literacy | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

How can can adults nurture children’s capacity to “connect the dots” through everyday conversations and activities? How can educators build an environment that leads children to see the patterns that make a difference? In this article, educator and writer Linda Booth Sweeney points out that thinking about systems means paying attention to the interrelationships, patterns, and dynamics that surround us – and that children are naturally attuned to this. In cultivating systems literacy, you build upon this natural understanding to help promote this integrated way of thinking for the children in your life.


Via David Hodgson
more...
David Hodgson's curator insight, February 21, 2013 11:19 AM

How can can adults nurture children’s capacity to “connect the dots” through everyday conversations and activities? How can educators build an environment that leads children to see the patterns that make a difference? In this article, educator and writer Linda Booth Sweeney points out that thinking about systems means paying attention to the interrelationships, patterns, and dynamics that surround us – and that children are naturally attuned to this. In cultivating systems literacy, you build upon this natural understanding to help promote this integrated way of thinking for the children in your life.

Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Climate Change Promises Tough Times for Asia and Africa - Report

Climate Change Promises Tough Times for Asia and Africa - Report | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Urbanisation is increasing rapidly, especially in the developing world, with many more people living in slums and informal settlements, Kyte told IPS from London.

 

As climate change disrupts rainfall patterns and generates more extreme weather in the coming decades, leading to poor crop yields, rural populations will flood cities. Escalating numbers of urban poor will suffer, with temperatures magnified by the "heat island effect" of the constructed urban environments.

 

Safe drinking water will also be harder to find, especially after floods, contributing to greater water-borne diseases such as cholera and diarrhoea.

Coastal regions like Bangladesh and India's two largest coastal cities, Kolkata and Mumbai, will face extreme river floods, more intense tropical cyclones, rising sea levels and very high temperatures.

 

"Huge numbers of urban poor will be exposed in many coastal cities," Kyte said.

 

"We face a huge challenge over the next 20 years to... redesign our cities to protect them from climate change," Kyte predicted, even as cities already face a huge infrastructure investment gap.

 

One trillion dollars a year needed to be invested every year by 2020 by some estimates, Kyte said, adding that "to build climate resilience into cities will take another 300 to 500 million dollars a year".

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Scientific Proof That Cities Are Like Nothing Else in Nature

Scientific Proof That Cities Are Like Nothing Else in Nature | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

"Luis Bettencourt, a physicist with the Santa Fe Institute, explains why we've never been able to come up with a proper metaphor for the city"

 

Bettencourt’s theoretical framework suggests that a kind of optimal city exists when we have the most social interaction – and social and economic output coming from it – with the least cost of connecting people and goods and ideas to each other. A sprawling city, for instance, isn’t reaching the full potential it could achieve if more people moved into town in denser development. Likewise, a dense but congested city loses some of the potential it could achieve with better transportation.

ddrrnt's insight:

He encourages us to look at "what cities do", the processes and interconnected relationships, not just the form.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Mimiboard. The Virtual Noticeboard. Empowering Local Communities

South Africa-based Umuntu Media, as part of a mission to help communities create and find useful content, decided to bring the news board online.

 

Mimiboard marks an evolution of the way local information can be shared. It is simply the digital manifestation of a time-trusted product many Africans can relate to. At the same time, Mimiboard is not just a traditional news portal. It allows for mobile sharing and provides a great user experience – something previous online forums have failed to accomplish.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

India's millennium city a 'slum for the rich'?

India's millennium city a 'slum for the rich'? | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
The BBC's Shalu Yadav looks at why Gurgaon, India's Millennium City, has turned out to be a failure in planning.

 

Infrastructure is in a shambles: electricity is infrequent and erratic, groundwater is declining at an alarming rate, and the sewage system and roads are decrepit. There aren't enough policemen to secure the burgeoning population.

 

A whopping 70% of the residents are dependant on ground water, which is being indiscriminately extracted despite restrictions.

 

Things are so alarming that the federal ground water authorities have warned that the water table will be completely depleted by 2017.

The sewage situation also looks dire.

 

Delhi's Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) believes that by 2021, Gurgaon's estimated 3.5m people will produce so much waste that the city will be drowning in its own sewage.

 

"Unfortunately in India, infrastructure doesn't precede development. That is why one feels that Gurgaon and many upcoming Indian cities are a failure. India needs sustainable urbanisation, " Lalit Jain, chairman of the Confederation of Real Estate Developers' Association of India said.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Rethinking our country’s planning : A need for a new urban form

Rethinking our country’s planning : A need for a new urban form | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Mauritius is an island of promise and of prosperity, an island symbolising dreams of brighter tomorrows.   ... a new ordered urban form is strongly needed: one that promotes the connection of human beings to their activities. As for its structure, instead of centralised city, we need a living & productive model. One of which could be that of a geometrically living cellular pattern where each cells having their own cores, much like a living organism. A setting of this sort, adapted to our local planning code, would have numerous advantages:

• It would help promote a decentralised system.
• Vehicular transportation would be discouraged and basic activities that connect a human to his habitat, such as walking, would be on the increase. 
• The panorama would be more pleasing as our roads would be populated with fewer cars. This would in turn decrease the need for numerous parking lots and hence encourage the green expansion of land. This would also directly impact on the pollution levels.
• A drop in stress levels and increase in productivity rate.
• Economically more viable as it would reduce our energy consumption through vehicular fuel cut back and decreased electricity consumption through reduced heat island effect.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

A Visit to an Integrated Urban Plan for the City of Manaus, Brazil | PPIAF

A Visit to an Integrated Urban Plan for the City of Manaus, Brazil | PPIAF | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Since 1970, the population of Manaus grew from 300,000 to over 2 million inhabitants.  Many of those who arrived, lacking a place to live, squatted on empty lots and built palafitas—wooden shacks that sit on stilts. 


By 2003 the city of Manaus faced important urban challenges as a result of rapid population growth, unplanned city growth, and a lack of investment in sanitation infrastructure. 


The government of the State of Amazonas, of which Manaus is the capital, decided to take action to improve the living conditions of the inhabitants of the igarapés and bring back the splendor of the city of Manaus.  The government began preparing an Integrated Urban Plan for the city that included engineering, environment, urbanization, housing, social, and institutional action. 

ddrrnt's insight:

https://twitter.com/toughLoveforx/status/344163348990021632

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from The Big Picture
Scoop.it!

Brighton & Hove is world's first One Planet Living City

Brighton & Hove became the world’s first designated One Planet City on 18 April 2013 when the city’s Sustainability Action Plan officially received independent accreditation from BioRegional for its plans to enable residents to live well within a fairer share of the earth’s resources. BioRegional is an award winning charity with an international reputation for developing sustainable solutions.


Via David Hodgson
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Your Brain Really Wants To Be In Nature

Your Brain Really Wants To Be In Nature | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
If (like me) you’ve been sitting at your desk for too long, then you really ought to get up, find the nearest park, and go for a nice walk.

 

Writing about the paper, Richard Coyne (Researcher at Heriot-Watt University, in Edinburgh) says the work shows the public benefits of investing in greenery:

 

"Our study has implications for promoting urban green space to enhance mood, important in encouraging people to walk more or engage in other forms of physical or reflective activity. More green plazas, parkland, trees, access to the countryside, and urban design and architecture that incorporates more of the atmosphere of outdoor open space are all good for our health and wellbeing."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Cultivating a Better Food Production System

Cultivating a Better Food Production System | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
Written by the founders of Food Tank; 13 resolutions for changing the food production system.

 

Growing in Cities:  Food production doesn’t only happen in fields or factories. Nearly one billion people worldwide produce food in cities. In Kibera, the largest slum in Africa, farmers are growing seeds of indigenous vegetables and selling them to rural farmers. At Bell Book & Candle restaurant in New York, customers are served rosemary, cherry tomatoes, romaine, and other produce grown from the restaurant’s aeroponic rooftop garden.
 
Creating Better Access:  People’s Grocery in Oakland and Fresh Moves in Chicago bring mobile grocery stores to food deserts giving low-income consumers opportunities to make healthy food choices. Instead of chips and soda, they provide customers with affordable organic produce, not typically available in their communities.

more...
Jared Broker's comment, June 14, 2013 9:57 PM
Local and urban gardening is the future of food. The horrifying studies of GMO food are fueling it. About time!
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Crowd-sourced data hold potential for positive change and human rights abuses

Crowd-sourced data hold potential for positive change and human rights abuses | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

"Citizens become participants in data collection without having to alter their normal routines," Fawkes said. The goal in such cases is less to create scientific data than to create "good-enough data," Fawkes said, that such information could help get the U.N. started in taking a closer look at local needs and developing response plans. Quickly collected crowd-sourced data can enable early interventions and the implementation of social safety nets that can bring quick aid to a disaster zone or political crisis and thereby prevent long-term damage to communities.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

The environment is the space in which we live, work, and play.

I tend to employ a definition more often used by those in the environmental justice movement–that the environment is the space in which we live, work, and play. It includes our parks and schools,  shops and workplaces, our homes and backyards.  Environmentalism includes the health effects of children living by freeways, the planning of a new sub-division in a city, the vegetables grown in the yard of a rural or urban home. Without understanding our environment as something in which we are a part, the chasm between “people” and “place,” “society” and “environment,” will continue to loom large.

 

I would like to argue that such a dichotomy is not, and must not be true; and that privileging the land over people, or vice versa, is not a “sustainable” behaviour. Yet all too often, it appears that one side of the equation is left out, depending on what sphere of influence one happens to travel within.  Social justice is often a forgotten cast-off in the environmental sphere, while environmental impacts become minimized by those privileging a social lens. Each side believes they are justified.

 

By: Darlene Seto
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

FOOD FIGHT - Earth Amplified feat. Stic.Man of Dead Prez

‎"We feel the greatest hope for fundamental change starts with the foundation for the future -- our youth -- so the Food Fight team combined music and film with a school curriculum, to help teachers engage students on the most pressing issues we face, in a unique way.

The flaws of our global economy are best exposed by looking at our food system -- soil-depleting and oil-depleting factory farming, economic policies that contribute to starvation abroad, and disease and obesity at home, all packaged with a marketing campaign to enforce the "buy first, ask never" social contract -- just buy what they say to buy, and eat/shut up.

 

If we care about our kids, ourselves, and our planet, it's time to expose the truth on a broader scale, and hope enough Food Fighters step up to make the changes we need."

 

SHARE IT? Accompanying FREE CURRICULUM, LYRICS & SONG DOWNLOAD at http://SosJuice.com/foodfight ;

more...
No comment yet.