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Arrival Cities
being an immigrant or living in a "slum" is a feature not a bug
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Get Away From the Sprawl: More Young Folks Moving Into Cities

Get Away From the Sprawl: More Young Folks Moving Into Cities | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

If it seems like cities these days are crawling with more young people than ever before, that's because they are, according to data released by the U.S. Census Bureau.

 

The takeaway by the AP is hardly a surprise:


Burdened with college debt or toiling in temporary, lower-wage positions, they are spurning homeownership in the suburbs for shorter-term, no-strings-attached apartment living, public transit and proximity to potential jobs in larger cities.

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BioLite - Cookstove that also generates electricity

BioLite - Cookstove that also generates electricity | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

The decentralization of electricity generation is a critical component of a resilient global "brain", not to mention having light and comfort. BioLite has created a low-cost biomass cookstove that, by converting waste heat into electricity, reduces smoke emissions by up to 95% while simultaneously providing users with the capability to charge mobile phones and LED lights.


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How Can We Create 1.5 Million Jobs And Reduce Pollution? Recycling. — Green For All

How Can We Create 1.5 Million Jobs And Reduce Pollution? Recycling. — Green For All | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

"A new report called More Jobs, Less Pollution was released this week, showing that a national 75% recycling rate would create nearly 1.5 million new jobs while reducing an amount of climate pollution equal to shutting down 72 coal-fired power plants, or taking 50 million cars off the road. This report describes the benefits of building a resource recovery economy that creates community jobs with family-supporting wages."


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the transition of West Rockland Street

This soundslide showcases the transition that West Rockland Street has undergone. Residents hope to improve the appearance and value of the neighborhood. Voice of Ada Pullett.
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How data could save cities from outgrowing themselves

How data could save cities from outgrowing themselves | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
According to physicist Geoffrey West, the world's cities have what one might call a growing problem. As they grow bigger, their problems grow worse, which means it takes an ever-faster pace of innovation to keep things in check.
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How solar power can help the billion people without electricity

How solar power can help the billion people without electricity | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

One of the major opportunities lies in providing energy access for the more than 1.2 billion people who don't have electricity, most of whom, in business-as-usual scenarios, still won't have it in 2030. These are the poorest people on the planet. Ironically, the world's poorest can best afford the most sophisticated lighting — off-grid combinations of solar panels, power electronics, and LED lights. And this creates an opportunity for which the economics are compelling, the moral urgency profound, the development benefits enormous, and the potential leverage game changing.

 

The cost of coal and copper — the ingredients of conventional grid power — are soaring. Meanwhile, the cost of solar panels and LEDs, the ingredients of distributed renewable power, are racing down even faster.

 

If we want the poor to benefit from electricity we cannot wait for the grid, and we cannot rely on fossil fuels. The International Energy Agency, historically a grid-centric, establishment voice, admits that half of those without electricity today will never be wired. The government of India estimates that two-thirds of its non-electrified households need distributed power.

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Dreams of Eco-community come true | Imagine Rural Development Initiative

Dreams of Eco-community come true | Imagine Rural Development Initiative | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

It begins with the dream

 

A year ago, the eco-community at Ngabwe, a thriving area of 200 sq km of virgin with sunken lakes and rivers running through it, was simply a dream. Today it is unfolding.

 

As Chief Ngabwe, the head of a tribe of 6000 people in Zambia and Steven Putter of Imagine Rural Development, sat night after night dreamtalking about the building of an eco village, thousands of miles away John Kriedler and his wife Kelly were wondering how they could make their dream of living sustainably come true.

 

If not my dream > your dream = our dream

 

Read on  


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Going Holistic: Health and Conservation Converge in Tanzania

Going Holistic: Health and Conservation Converge in Tanzania | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
Incorporating women’s, children’s and community health — along with gender equity — is critical to attaining a more sustainable human relationship with our planet.

 

Susan Kabiwa-Nturama lives in western Tanzania. With 6 children, she struggles to support her family, working long days on her small plot of land and walking hours each morning to gather water.


These days, fields are less productive, water is scarcer and access to health care is difficult to obtain, sometimes dangerously difficult. Childbirth complications mean long journeys to Kigoma, the nearest city. In 2007, Susan nearly died from such complications, and she lost her baby that day. One in ten children in western Tanzania die before the age of five, a period of life that is both precious and precarious for children and their families in much of rural Africa.


When asked to compare her life to that of her parents, she says simply, “Life is harder.” What would make life easier, Susan says, are things many of us take for granted: primary school, access to family planning and more knowledge about ways to protect and utilize natural resources.

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Cities Take the Lead on Tackling Climate Change | WRI Insights

Cities Take the Lead on Tackling Climate Change | WRI Insights | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Climate change may not have been on the official Rio+20 agenda, but that didn’t stop mayors from megacities around the world from making major headway on the issue. At the Rio+20 conference on Tuesday, the network of C40 city leaders announced a huge new commitment to address global climate change through local action: They will reduce 1.3 billion metric tons of carbon emissions by 2030.


Via Flora Moon, Renew Cities
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Vertical Veg – inspiring and supporting food growing in tiny spaces

Vertical Veg – inspiring and supporting food growing in tiny spaces | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
Looking for inspiration and practical advice on how to grow food in containers? Vertical Veg offers ideas, tips and training to make the most of small spaces.
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Why the Places We Live Make Us Happy

Why the Places We Live Make Us Happy | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

In an article titled "Understanding the Pursuit of Happiness in Ten Major Cities," the authors concluded that good urbanism contributes positively to happiness:

 

"We find that the design and conditions of cities are associated with the happiness of residents in 10 urban areas. Cities that provide easy access to convenient public transportation and to cultural and leisure amenities promote happiness. Cities that are affordable and serve as good places to raise children also have happier residents. We suggest that such places foster the types of social connections that can improve happiness and ultimately enhance the attractiveness of living in the city."

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Mariana Soffer's comment, June 25, 2012 7:01 AM
I really like your work dd, it's great
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Havana Urban Agriculture - Infrastructure for Food Gardens

Havana Urban Agriculture - Infrastructure for Food Gardens | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Havana, Cuba is often lauded as the world leader in urban agriculture, with some sources suggesting that anywhere from 50% to 90% of the city's fresh produce is grown within it's boundaries. The formation of a strong urban agriculture system in Havana began as a response to crisis - the collapse of the Soviet Bloc in 1989 - at which point Cuba lost access to importing food and agricultural inputs from their main trading partner. Further pressure came in the form of the U.S. embargo which created a shortage of gasoline for transporting food from rural to urban areas. A major food shortage resulted, and when residents began planting their own food across the city, the Ministry of Agriculture supported them. In 1994 an Urban Agriculture Department was formed.

 

Read the interview with Claire Napawan-Seybert is a landscape architect, and a professor in the U.C. Davis Department of Environmental Design. Her research focuses on urban agriculture systems, and she recently visited Havana, Cuba to see the famed urban food gardens first-hand.

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The Easily Ignored Plants of Daily Life

The Easily Ignored Plants of Daily Life | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Peter Del Tredici’s Wild Urban Plants of the Northeast serves not only as an absorbing field guide to spontaneous urban plants but also as a razor-sharp critique of how we value urban plants in general. In clear, jargon-free language, Del Tredici lays out his challenge to our ecological assumptions in the book’s introduction. He describes how we have a tendency to negatively judge plants that grow without human intention. Indeed, most of the plants described in this book are traditionally dismissed as weeds. Furthermore, we negatively judge plants based on their place of origin, labeling non-native species as “invasive.” Del Tredici argues that by automatically tagging these spontaneous urban plants as ecologically harmful, we ignore their potential benefits.

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Beijing, a Boon for Africa

Beijing, a Boon for Africa | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
China’s investment in Africa is not a new form of imperialism — it’s Africa’s best hope for economic growth.

 

"In 2009, China became Africa’s single largest trading partner, surpassing the United States. And China’s foreign direct investment in Africa has skyrocketed from under $100 million in 2003 to more than $12 billion in 2011."

 

by @DambisaMoyo, an economist and author of “Winner Take All: China’s Race for Resources and What It Means for the World.”

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CITY2.0 - Recycled Amusement

CITY2.0  - Recycled Amusement | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

“I shifted from doing artwork to just hang on walls, having little influence on society, to doing art that solves community needs. It’s helped me realize my value to society.”

 

Ruganzu Bruno Tusingwire is a 29-year old eco-artist from Uganda as well as the founding curator of TEDxKampala. In addition to being the winner of the first City 2.0 Award, Tusingwire is a 2011 Young Achievers award winner and a lecturer in the Department of Art & Design at Kyambogo University. His big idea is to use waste materials to create a movable amusement park for children living in slums of Kampala.

 

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CDC School in Thailand

CDC School in Thailand | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

The armed conflict that has persisted for decades in the Karen State of Myanmar results in a daily flow of refugees and immigrants to neighboring Thailand. In the Thai town of Mae Sot, a few kilometers from the Burmese border, numerous schools and orphanages offer accommodation and education to those in need. One of these centers, the CDC School (children development center) under the tutelage of Mae Tao Clinic organization, was built this year to host more than 500 students. Funded by the Embassy of Luxembourg in Bangkok, the low-impact building respects local practices and architecture.

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Eyes (and Hands) On The Street: Tactical Urbanism and Community Engagement

Eyes (and Hands) On The Street: Tactical Urbanism and Community Engagement | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

On Monday, San Francisco rolled out a website meant to help residents unravel the bureaucracy surrounding the city’s urban planning and improvement projects. Is this true DIY Urbanism?

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Intentional EcoVillage Takes Shape In Virginia | Earthtechling

Intentional EcoVillage Takes Shape In Virginia | Earthtechling | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Green co-housing enthusiasts of Virginia, take note: The Floyd EcoVillage, a new intentional community focused on bringing together people who want to live and work “in an environment that encourages sustainability, personal growth and lifelong learning” is coming to the New River Valley.

 

Every building planned here, which include duplexes and single family homes, will be built to a high energy conservation standard using as many locally harvested building materials as possible. Some will be built by the homeowner, others by the community (to be offered as rental or leased housing) but the overall goal here is ambitious: a net-zero energy use plan. The development will encompass 75 acres.

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Edible City

Edible City | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Edible City is a 72 minute documentary film that asks a few burning questions…

 

“How can we live in cities and still eat local, healthy, sustainable food?”


“How can we create jobs, build local economies, and increase food security all at the same time?”


“How can we create food systems that are economically, socially, and environmentally just?”

 

Edible City follows ten extraordinary stories exploring what’s going on in the food movement today, from the grassroots growth to the politics in Washington, D.C., from Occupy Oakland to creating community resiliency and local economic infrastructure.

 

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Africa: 1.3 Billion People Live in Extreme Poverty

There are 1.3 billion people living in extreme poverty and close to 900 million chronically undernourished globally, according to United Nations.

 

the world now faces the challenge of raising global food production by 60 per cent by 2050, while managing the natural resource base so that we are not robbing future generations.

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Putting Life Before Corporate Interests and Profits.

Putting Life Before Corporate Interests and Profits. | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Big business wants to control our resources--grabbing land, privatizing water, patenting seeds, and trying to squeeze out anyone who gets in the way of their profits. Fortunately, there is an alternative that places the rights of people and communities ahead of corporate interests--resource rights....


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Agenda 21: plot or paranoia?

Agenda 21: plot or paranoia? | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Professional planners and others who have looked into Agenda 21 say the alleged plot is a nonsensical conspiracy theory stemming from long-held fears that the U.N. is bent on ruling the planet under a world government. (...)


Those trying to end Agenda 21 — sometimes called "Agenders" — say the federal government pushes the U.N. plan to the local level. Then local officials impose it, often unwittingly, on citizens through measures such as the protection of open lands — a move some see as forcing people into dense "human settlement zones" where bikes are preferred over cars. (...)


"It makes it really hard to have meaningful discussions about what you want to do with your community when 95 percent of the professional language is off-limits because of the supposed nexus to Agenda 21." (...)


"It takes very little scrutiny to see that (the U.N. plot) is complete fiction and paranoia," Knapp said. "It's based on fear. People seem to just keep piling more and more things onto this conspiracy theory, and it's absurd."

 

 

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Networked Resilient Communities

Networked Resilient Communities | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Networked Resilient Communities integrate the production of food, energy, and water into the community’s fabric. They smartly leverage the best technologies and methodologies (e.g. permaculture) to maximize the quality, quantity, and availability of essential goods.

 

Networked Resilient Communities aren’t insular. They understand a larger world exists and even if the economy is depressed, they are actively entrepreneurial. They seek new sources of income. However, they don’t do this by courting large businesses. They do this by helping small artisinal businesses and co-ops export goods and services to the larger world. A group of nimble, small businesses like these produce a diverse income stream (where if one goes dry, another takes its place). They also can be flexible on terms (trade, barter, new currencies, etc.) in ways that larger businesses cannot.

 

Networked Resilient Communities build local platforms that make it easier for everyone in the community to produce. From tool libraries to Saturday fix-it sessions to hackerspaces t0 co-working spaces to solar co-ops to community supported agriculture to garden allotments to community currencies. Platforms that make the common things needed for productive tasks easier and less expensive. Platforms that make community building and business formation easier.

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Five ways the Smart City will change how Africa lives

Five ways the Smart City will change how Africa lives | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Imagine waking up in a house that practically runs itself, a low-carbon city where traffic congestion is almost non-existent, neighbourhoods are safer, and you can just use a single card or tag to do almost everything from buying groceries to paying your bus fare.  Sounds too far-fetched for Africa? it's actually not. Matebello Motloung looks at how smart cities will change how Africa lives in the next five years.

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