Arrival Cities
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being an immigrant or living in a "slum" is a feature not a bug
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Climate Change, Disaster Risk, and the Urban Poor: Cities Building Resilience for a Changing World

Climate Change, Disaster Risk, and the Urban Poor: Cities Building Resilience for a Changing World | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Poor people living in slums are at particularly high risk from the impacts of climate change and natural hazards. They live on the most vulnerable lands within cities, typically areas that are deemed undesirable by others and are thus affordable. Residents are exposed to the impacts of landslides, sea-level rise, flooding, and other hazards. Exposure to risk is exacerbated by overcrowded living conditions, lack of adequate infrastructure and services, unsafe housing, inadequate nutrition, and poor health. These conditions can turn a natural hazard or change in climate into a disaster, and result in the loss of basic services, damage or destruction to homes, loss of livelihoods, malnutrition, disease, disability, and loss of life. This study analyzes the key challenges facing the urban poor given the risks associated with climate change and disasters, particularly with regard to the delivery of basic services, and identifies strategies and financing opportunities for addressing these risks. Several key findings emerge from the study and provide guidance for addressing risk:

 

1) The urban poor are on the front line. The poor are particularly vulnerable to climate change and natural hazards due to where they live within cities, and the lack of reliable basic services.

 

2) City governments are the drivers for addressing risks. Local governments play a vital role in providing basic services which are critical to improving the resilience of the urban poor.

 

3) City officials build resilience by mainstreaming risk reduction into urban management. Climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction can be best addressed and sustained over time through integration with existing urban planning and management practices.

 

4) Significant financial support is needed. Local governments need to leverage existing and new resources to meet the shortfalls in service delivery and basic infrastructure adaptation.

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California's Unusual Plan to Cut Greenhouse Gases

California's Unusual Plan to Cut Greenhouse Gases | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
The state is relying on cities to figure out how to cut emissions in their region. Will it work?
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Detroit | Y Worlds

Detroit | Y Worlds | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
RESURRECTION

Y Worlds formally offers the City of Detroit, the State of Michigan and the United States Government a plan to make Detroit the first collaboratively developed sustainable and NETS driven modern city in North America.

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Worker Bees on a Rooftop, Ignoring Urban Pleasures

Worker Bees on a Rooftop, Ignoring Urban Pleasures | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

At One Bryant Park in Manhattan, the Durst Organization is cultivating bees as part of an environmental program for the 51-story building.''

 

"Beekeeping has also been catching on atop buildings outside of New York. Earlier this summer, bee hives were added to the green roofs of the Minneapolis City Hall building, and similar environs have been encouraged in other urban areas with green roof habitats. In London, the number of urban beehives has exploded in recent years, to the point there was concern that the city had an insufficient supply of bee-friendly plants to feed the growing populations."


"On the green roof at One Bryant Park, the bees’ natural pollination process helps maintain the area’s nearly 6,000 square feet, where the sedum was planted to help to reduce urban heat energy and runoff."

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Abandoned Walmart is Now America’s Largest Library | WebUrbanist

Abandoned Walmart is Now America’s Largest Library | WebUrbanist | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

There are thousands of abandoned big box stores sitting empty all over America, including hundreds of former Walmart stores. With each store taking up enough space for 2.5 football fields, Walmart’s use of more than 698 million square feet of land in the U.S. is one of its biggest environmental impacts. But at least one of those buildings has been transformed into something arguably much more useful: the nation’s largest library.

 

A sprawling abandoned Walmart in McAllen, Texas has been transformed into the nation's largest public library, with self-check-out kiosks and an art gallery.

 

 

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Shareable: Region in Italy Reaches 30% Coop Economy

Shareable: Region in Italy Reaches 30% Coop Economy | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

The Emilia-Romagna region in Northern Italy is one of the richest in Europe, known for its high-end car manufacturing. While Emilia-Romagna is one of the most economically successful regions in Europe, it is also one of the most cooperative regions in the world. Nearly two of every three of its 4.5 million citizens are members of a cooperative. Cooperatives support around 30% of the region’s GDP, making it a stellar example of a large-scale cooperative economy. As with Mondragon Cooperative Corporation in Spain, the cooperative economy is strongly bolstered by networked relationships which also make cooperatives more resilient in economic crises. Learn more by watching the prezi below.

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Nations are no longer driving globalization—cities are

Nations are no longer driving globalization—cities are | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
Urbanization has already declared itself the mega-trend of the 21st century, with half the world’s population now living in cities for the first time in human history.

 

"Globalization itself is as much an inter-city phenomenon as it is about lowering national borders. According to a McKinsey Global Institute study, almost the entire world economy is represented by approximately 400 cities. Airline connections around the world depend on the development of robust “hubs” such as Chicago, London, Zurich or Singapore, which in turn magnify the reach of globalization inward to smaller cities in their regions. "

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Land concentration, land grabbing and peopleʼs struggles in Europe

Land concentration, land grabbing and peopleʼs struggles in Europe | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Until now the global phenomenon that is widely referred to as ?land grabbing' has been generally assumed to be happening only in the Global South, and with many reports claiming that it is concentrated in Africa and that the main land grabbers are Chinese, Indian and South Korean companies as well as the Gulf States. Transnational social movement and NGO campaigns have likewise tended to accept unquestioningly this general assumption that land grabbing is a phenomenon focused on countries in the South, especially African countries. By bringing Europe's land issues into focus, the present study stands to change the way we think of contemporary land grabbing in at least three fundamental ways.

 

First, land grabbing is not the only important and pressing land issue in the world today; the ongoing trend of 'generic' land concentration is just as significant and problematic. Second, land concentration and land grabbing do not only occur in developing countries in the South, but are trends that are currently underway in Europe as well. Third, the study shows that people's struggles against land concentration and land grabbing are also unfolding in Europe, suggesting that a truly transnational perspective on political struggle against contemporary enclosures is certainly warranted, if not urgently needed. 

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Cooperatives as Business Models of the Future

Cooperatives as Business Models of the Future | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Cooperatives as Business Models of the Future - When the International Year of Cooperatives (IYC) concluded last week, some of the overwhelming success stories highlighted at a two-day interactive session came both from developing and developed countries,...

Dame Pauline Green, president of the International Cooperative Alliance...

In Brazil, Green said, a clearly defined government policy aimed at helping rural people, through cooperative businesses, has seen a massive reduction in poverty in the rural areas of the sprawling South American nation.

In Kenya, cooperatives account for nearly half of the country’s gross domestic product (GDP), while in Rwanda the cooperative economy has gone from zero to eight percent of GDP over the last 10 years.

The world’s largest 300 cooperatives, primarily in the insurance and food and agriculture sectors, generated revenues of 1.6 trillion dollars and employed nearly 100 million people worldwide.

 

Asked if the cooperative model of enterprise may well be one of the answers to the global economic crisis, Green told IPS, “Without doubt the cooperative business model offers a proven solution to this global economic crisis we are mired in.”

In the UK, she said, schools have become one of the fastest-growing parts of the cooperative economy.


“Renewable energy cooperatives have been springing up all over the globe, and of course media is another area which benefits from the cooperative model because it ensures independent journalism remains viable,” she noted.

 

ddrrnt's insight:

https://twitter.com/toughLoveforx/status/356034145530556418

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Urbanism and Remote Village Life

Urbanism and Remote Village Life | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

That package of instant soup began its life as a product in a factory thousands of miles away from the monastery, its vegetable contents coming from farms even farther away. Now the empty plastic pouch was going to land in a rubbish pile somewhere on the sides of this breathtakingly beautiful mountain, and perhaps eventually find its way into the roaring Spiti river to be swept back down towards the plains whence it came. For the monastery, like every other settlement in the valley—and indeed, like every urban area in the world—has a growing garbage disposal problem.

 

Just as unthinkable as the Facebook apps on cellphones in nearly every villager’s hands, the ATMs dispensing cash in remote towns, or the televisions bringing international cricket tournaments and advertisements for hair and skin products into many homes now electrified and plugged into the global grid. For the once sleepy settlements in these remote mountains, which only drew hardy souls from the plains seeking refuge and spiritual enlightenment in nature, away from the bustle of modern industrial civilization, have now turned into outposts along the rapidly urbanizing fringe of that very civilization.

 

This urbanization has no doubt improved many human lives, helping solve some age old problems with modern technology, but also creating new ones threatening both human health and the biodiversity of this fragile desert ecosystem.

 

Sustainable Cities Collective 04 July 13

Madhusudan Katti http://www.thenatureofcities.com/

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Escaping poverty through low end globalisation?

Escaping poverty through low end globalisation? | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

This photograph is taken in Guangzhou (the city once known as Canton) at a wholesale clothing market. Most of the people in the market are not from Guangzhou. The market traders are a mix of people from China and from a number of different nations in Africa. The customers are primarily Africans.  It is an international place, drawing all toward a common goal:  to escape poverty through the international circulation of cell phones and clothing.   

 

Most of those Africans in Guangzhou are working in businesses that facilitate the export of goods back to Africa.  Gordon Matthews in his book Ghetto at the centre of the world tells us that Africans go through stages of engagement in the process of becoming a trader with China. The easiest point of access is via Hong Kong and in particular through a single building: Chung King Mansions. The traders come to Hong Kong with money that they have scraped together from friends and family seeking out those with experience. In Hong Kong, they will either buy from local wholesalers, which is a more expensive but potentially less risky option, and ship the good back or taken home as part of their luggage.  Those who are more connected or willing to take bigger risks may find  a guide who will take them to Shenzhen or, even better, Guangzhou to buy from wholesalers directly. Goods will then be shipped as in the photograph above or again carried home as luggage. Those who successfully manage the first trip, and are able to get their goods home, then survive economically to return again. Many do not.

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Eating the Landscape: American Indian Stories of Food, Identity, and Resilience

Eating the Landscape: American Indian Stories of Food, Identity, and Resilience | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

“Eating is not only a political act, it is also a cultural act that reaffirms one’s identity and worldview,” Enrique Salmón writes in Eating the Landscape. Traversing a range of cultures, including the Tohono O’odham of the Sonoran Desert and the Rarámuri of the Sierra Tarahumara, the book is an illuminating journey through the southwest United States and northern Mexico. Salmón weaves his historical and cultural knowledge as a renowned Indigenous ethnobotanist with stories American Indian farmers have shared with him to illustrate how traditional Indigenous foodways—from the cultivation of crops to the preparation of meals—are rooted in a time-honored understanding of environmental stewardship.

 

In this fascinating personal narrative, Salmón focuses on an array of Indigenous farmers who uphold traditional agricultural practices in the face of modern changes to food systems such as extensive industrialization and the genetic modification of food crops. Despite the vast cultural and geographic diversity of the region he explores, Salmón reveals common themes: the importance of participation in a reciprocal relationship with the land, the connection between each group’s cultural identity and their ecosystems, and the indispensible correlation of land consciousness and food consciousness. Salmón shows that these collective philosophies provide the foundation for indigenous resilience as the farmers contend with global climate change and other disruptions to long-established foodways. This resilience, along with the rich stores of traditional ecological knowledge maintained by indigenous agriculturalists, Salmón explains, may be the key to sustaining food sources for humans in years to come.

Traversing a range of cultures, including the Tohono O'odham of the Sonoran Desert and the Rarámuri of the Sierra Tarahumara ByEnrique Salmón University of Arizona Press 2012 Excerpt: In My Grandm...

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Homegrown Cities Project: common sense to the rescue of Mumbai slums

Homegrown Cities Project: common sense to the rescue of Mumbai slums | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Bhandup is called a slum by the municipality. We prefer to refer to this hillside settlement located in the northeastern suburbs of Mumbai, as a ‘homegrown neighborhood’. We have been active there for a few years, documenting local construction techniques and contributing to the construction of a Hindu temple. From above, Bhandup looks a lot like a Rio favela. Within it has the same vibrancy and similar infrastructural issues. The area is typically low-rise, high-density and pedestrian. It is also mixed-use, hosting a great variety of businesses within its residential fabric. Every time we visit the area we see new houses being built by local masons and residents. Each of them occupies a 150 to 200 square feet area, and has one or two floors. Bhandup residents have access to water and community toilets, and electricity is available everywhere. Most people have television and cell phones. No one there is dying of hunger. What this neighbourhood needs most is to be recognized as a viable form of urbanization – not as a slum. The efforts of its residents and local constructors should be supported.

 

Our contention is that only by working within the existing fabric and with local actors, can urbanists, architects, engineers and policy makers contribute meaningfully to ongoing user-lead improvement in homegrown neighbourhoods. This is why we have just launched the project Homegrown Cities that aims at demonstrating that common sensical alternatives to ‘redevelopment’ do exist.

 

http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/homegrown-cities

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The 10 Cities That Are Leading The Way In Urban Sustainability

The 10 Cities That Are Leading The Way In Urban Sustainability | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Cities are the laboratories where the most innovative ideas for surviving in the future can be tested. These 10--from New York to Tokyo to Bogota...

 

 

BOGOTA: URBAN TRANSPORTATION

MELBOURNE: ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILT ENVIRONMENT

COPENHAGEN: CARBON MEASUREMENT & PLANNING

MEXICO CITY: AIR QUALITY

MUNICH: GREEN ENERGY

RIO DE JANEIRO: SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES

NEW YORK: ADAPTATION & RESILIENCE

SAN FRANCISCO: WASTE MANAGEMENT

SINGAPORE: INTELLIGENT CITY INFRASTRUCTURE

TOKYO: FINANCE & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

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Bike lanes led to 49% increase in retail sales

Bike lanes led to 49% increase in retail sales | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Back in November 2012, the New York Department of Transportation released a report called Measuring the Street: New Metrics for the 21st Century, which had some compelling figures on the way that local business benefits from bike-lanes, for the fairly obvious reason that cyclists find it easy to stop and shop, as compared to drivers, who are more likely to continue on to a mall with a big parking lot, or shop online.

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Detroit: A Cautionary Tale For Modern Civilization

Detroit: A Cautionary Tale For Modern Civilization | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Detroit was the birthplace of so many hopes and dreams during that era of prosperity — a period of time now revealing faults inherent to the system. It was here, at Ford, that Taylorism and division of labor was born. Here, again, in the General Motors factory across the street, that consumer credit (and by extension, excessive household debt?) was first conceived. Even the first mall was built here. The whole city was a motorist utopia, with automobiles encoded in its DNA.

 

Of course, the recent desertion of Detroit — in the last 40 years, the population has shrunk from 1.8 million inhabitants to fewer than 800,000 — can be explained by a number of key historical events. The race riots during the 1960s triggered the flight of the white middle class to the suburbs, and the financial crisis in the 1980s forced the black middle class to up and leave.

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Visualizing The Future Urban World

Visualizing The Future Urban World | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
Think of the world’s biggest, most important cities and you probably picture London, New York, Beijing, Singapore--the bustling cities of today.

Via David Hodgson
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Very nice visualisations.

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What Exactly Is A Smart City?

What Exactly Is A Smart City? | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
Having worked in the smart cities space for several years now, I am encouraged by the growth of the sector and the pace of technological advancements being developed for urban environments.

 

Most cities can agree that there is real value in having a smart economy, smart environmental practices, smart governance, smart living, smart mobility, and smart people. Within each of these aspirational goals, I have included three key drivers to achieving the goal. There are over 100 indicators to help cities track their performance with specific actions developed for specific needs.

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Ecopolis: The emergence of 'regenerative cities'

Ecopolis: The emergence of 'regenerative cities' | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Professor Herbert Girardet has spent much of his working life on this issue and has come up with the concept of ‘regenerative cities' that aims to set out a roadmap of transformation in the way cities function - and also offers hope that humanity's fate need not be one of resource wars, conflict and climate chaos.

 

Girardet gradually came to realise that the concept of ‘sustainability' is no longer fit for purpose;

 

"Today there is much less to sustain than when the term was coined in the 1980s. We've exceeded the limits to growth on nearly every aspect of development. Sustainable development will not dig us out of the hole we find ourselves in. We have to start thinking in terms of regenerative development. This means working towards giving back to nature as much we take.

 

So, what is a regenerative city - ‘Ecopolis'? It is one that relies primarily on local and regional food supplies; it is powered, heated, cooled and driven by renewable energy, and it reuses resources and restores degraded ecosystems. This is diametrically opposed to how many cities are currently run: they use resources without concern for their origins or destination of their waste products; they emit vast amounts of carbon dioxide without ensuring reabsorption and they consume huge amounts of meat produced mainly with imported feed, often from devastated rainforest regions.


Via Steven Putter
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Can Waste Be Used to Regenerate Our Cities?

Can Waste Be Used to Regenerate Our Cities? | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
With the rise of urban dwellers comes the rise of urban waste. And, although the hidden life of garbage is still ignored by many, there is no way of escaping one of modern societies most pressing issues: unsustainable waste management.

 

Could our rubbish be refabricated to become the fundamental building block of our future cities? This is the latest radical idea being suggested on the BBC’s Building Tomorrow series by Terreform ONE architect Mitchell Joachim. Read Joachim’s complete article on the BBC here: http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20130524-creating-our-cities-from-waste/allhttp://www.bbc.com/future/story/20130524-creating-our-cities-from-waste/all


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The median age of a person living in the slums of the world is 18.

The median age of a person living in the slums of the world is 18. | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

The median age of a person living in the slums of the world is 18. Or, in other words, as Daniel Ragan of UN Habitat (officially the United Nations Human Settlements Programme) told the group, most people in slums are youth. Further, Ragan explained, most of these youth do not have families. These variables create significant challenges in the the work of UN Habitat, which works to promote socially and environmentally sustainable towns and cities with the goal of providing adequate shelter for all. Ragan spoke about a number of important projects in which they are trying to empower youth in slums to follow their entrepreneurial inclinations and develop businesses that will help them get out of the slums through modest financial grants from UN Habitat. Ragan noted that entrepreneurial projects of youth occur in spite of the allure of gangs, which often provide a much-needed sense of community to many of these kids.

 

One of the most riveting presentations at the breakfast was by  Dr. Joan Clos, the head of UN Habitat who spoke about the worldwide trends of increased urbanization of the planet and how most cities and countries are failing to adequately prepare for this. Dr. Clos described how nearly three billion or almost half of the total global population is under 25. The majority of these populations are living in cities and towns in the developing world where nearly 90% of the world’s urban growth is taking place.

 

“We therefore need to change the current model of urbanization to create more productive cities by focusing on more strategic issues including urban legislation, land tenure, urban planning and designing, urban economy and municipal finance to prepare the cities to be places that generate jobs for its ever increasing population … Youth issues should be at the center stage of this urban transformation.”

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Urban resilience in a time of change - Colombes

Urban resilience in a time of change - Colombes | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Agrocité is an urban agriculture programme in the suburb of Colombes, which is an underprivileged town of 84,000 inhabitants near the city of Paris. The pilot programme that started in early 2012 is designed to introduce the dynamics of urban agriculture to community life. This will reconnect neighbours to one another and their living environment, empower them, and help revitalise a neglected urban context. The project includes a micro-experimental farm, community gardens, educational and cultural spaces, and devices for energy production, composting and rainwater recycling.

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Study Finds 79 Percent Increase in Crop Yields Using Sustainable Agriculture

Study Finds 79 Percent Increase in Crop Yields Using Sustainable Agriculture | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
In another blow to the fading promises of industrial monoculture and biotech spokesmen, a recent study in the journal Environmental Science and Technology finds that sustainable agriculture increased yields by an average of 79% over four years.

Via Ethni-City Gardens, FANRPAN
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ht @mark57g https://twitter.com/mark57g/status/352361160802177025

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, July 3, 2013 7:00 PM

Are you listening food-industrial complex?

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Resilient cities need resilient citizens

Resilient cities need resilient citizens | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

... psychology professor David DeSteno ... talking to an audience of hundreds at a summit on urban resilience convened by PopTech and the Rockefeller Foundation, The City Resilient, last week. “Humans respond to disruptions in one of two ways,” he said. “We stand together, or we stand alone.” And it turns out that choosing the first strategy affords the best long term outcome, according to evolutionary and mathematical simulations, DeSteno said.

....

A study conducted by the Associated Press and NORC at the University of Chicago on Resilience in the Wake of Superstorm Sandy released last week and presented by its authors at the Brooklyn summit found that “individuals in slowly recovering neighborhoods are less likely to believe that, generally speaking, most people can be trusted.” Their counterparts in the faster-to-recover neighborhoods were more likely to think the storm brought out the best in people and reported lower levels of hoarding food and water, looting, stealing, and vandalism.

 

As DeSteno said in his talk, choosing to stand alone, choosing to hoard, price-gouge, and steal, has a long-term negative effect for the community…and the individual: “In the long-run, it’s a poor strategy. The social bonds and support of a society — your social bonds and support — fall apart,” he said.

 

So clearly we need to stand together, we need to create a social infrastructure that encourages people to cooperate and feel compassionate toward one another.

 

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Mesh Network Helps Scottsdale, Arizona Relieve Traffic Congestion

Mesh Network Helps Scottsdale, Arizona Relieve Traffic Congestion | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Firetide Inc., the technology leader in next-generation wireless mesh networking, announced the successful deployment of a state-of-the-art wireless intelligent transportation system (ITS) for the Scottsdale Traffic Management Center (Scottsdale TMC). The ITS communications platform connects wirelessly to video cameras, traffic signal controllers and dynamic message signs on arterials throughout the city so experts at the Scottsdale TMC can continuously monitor traffic activity from a central command center. The ability to view live video feeds from heavy traffic areas enables city officials to make fast, well-informed decisions on how to prevent and reduce daily congestion, improve driver information and actively manage traffic affected by special events, weather, and emergency situations.

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