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Arrival Cities
being an immigrant or living in a "slum" is a feature not a bug
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Shareable: The City as Network and Commons

Shareable: The City as Network and Commons | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

The very notion of prosperity is being redefined by a new generation. It no longer means McMansions, SUVs, and Rolexes — baubles which Millennials watched their parents destroy themselves over. Many want something different, and most couldn’t afford the old dream anyway, even if they wanted it. In this new experiment, prosperity is defined by healthy relationships, realizing one’s creative potential, civic participation, meaningful experiences, and purposeful work — all things that actually deliver happiness.


In a sharing economy, products connect us rather than operating as status symbols that divide. Here product service systems and time-tested urban commons like libraries, parks, streets, and public transportation make our daily needs widely accessible. Here access trumps the burdens of ownership. Here we stop destroying our planet chasing a manufactured dream.


Instead, we come home to where prosperity has long been centered — within the vital relationships forged in our homes, neighborhoods, and cities. It’s no accident that Gen Y is flocking to cities in what is the greatest migration in history. But there’s an epoch-making twist beyond these shifts: the Internet widens the circle of sharing beyond family, tribe, and nation to the global scale.


by Neal Gorenflow 

Shareable 13 Nov 12

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Researchers Present Study on How Global Climate Change Affects Violence

If global warming is a scientific fact, then you better be prepared for the earth to become a more violent place. That's because new Iowa State University research shows that as the earth's average


... temperature rises, so too does human "heat" in the form of violent tendencies.


"It is very well researched and what I call the 'heat hypothesis,'" Anderson said. "When people get hot, they behave more aggressively.


... the researchers estimate that if the annual average temperature in the U.S. increases by 8°F (4.4°C), the yearly murder and assault rate will increase by 34 per 100,000 people -- or 100,000 more per year in a population of 305 million.


... global temperatures also increases known risk factors for the development of aggression in violence-prone individuals

rapid climate change can lead to changes in the availability of food, water, shelter...


... such shortages can also lead to civil war and unrest, migration to adjacent regions and conflict with people who already live in that region ... 

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polis: Mapping the Suburbanization of Poverty

polis: Mapping the Suburbanization of Poverty | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

One of the fundamental issues in American urbanism is the changing geography of poverty. American cities are famous around the world for having abandoned large portions of the central core, largely unthinkable in Europe and much of the world. Even if suburban historians are doing their best to remind us that poverty — along with economic, social and ethnic diversity — has always existed in suburbs, shifts in recent decades are fundamentally changing metropolitan life in many parts of the country.

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Totnes: the town that declared war on global capitalism

Totnes: the town that declared war on global capitalism | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Welcome, then, to another chapter in the ongoing battle between places that pride themselves on their local character, and the great stomping boot of multinational capitalism. That it is happening in Totnes (population: 7,500) is hardly surprising: long renowned as a byword for sustainable living and imaginative local politics, it also the home of the Transition Towns movement, focused not just on the way that people and places use fossil fuels, but how to make local economies more resilient by encouraging independent business, and fighting the kind of big interests that tend to take out more than they put in. Their most famous innovation is the Totnes Pound, a home-grown currency that is accepted by more than 70 local businesses.

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Why Millennials Don't Want To Buy Stuff

Why Millennials Don't Want To Buy Stuff | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Compared to previous generations, Millennials seem to have some very different habits that have taken both established companies and small businesses by surprise. One of these is that Generation Y doesn't seem to enjoy purchasing things.


The Atlantic's article "Why Don't Young Americans Buy Cars?" mused recently about Millennials' tendency to not care about owning a vehicle. The subtitle: "Is this a generational shift, or just a lousy economy at work?"


What if it's not an "age thing" at all? What's really causing this strange new behavior (or rather, lack of behavior)? Generational segments have profound impacts on perception and behavior, but an "ownership shift" isn't isolated within the Millennial camp. A writer for USA Today shows that all ages are in on this trend, but instead of an age group, he blames the change on the cloud, the heavenly home our entertainment goes to when current media models die. As all forms of media make their journey into a digital, de-corporeal space, research shows that people are beginning to actually prefer this disconnected reality to owning a physical product.

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Resilient Cities: Building Community Control

Resilient Cities: Building Community Control | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Critical Political Opportunity for Urban Centers
From a grassroots perspective, building community resilience and higher degrees of material self-sufficiency will be critical towards ensuring that communities of color weather coming ecological transitions. The basic needs of urban communities of color—such as access to potable water, healthy food, and mass transit—will otherwise be at stake in an era of heightened ecological stress.

 

“The key to truly addressing ecological crisis [is not] buying more hybrid cars but collective action towards systemic change,” says Claire Tran, the national organizer at Right To The City Alliance. “That’s what’s needed if we want to achieve community resilience in this period of ecological transition.”

 

via Urban Habitat

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Mariana Soffer's comment, July 19, 2012 6:06 AM
nice Dan
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We are shaking the world with a new dream

We are shaking the world with a new dream | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

In Detroit, everything is in your face: (the following is taken from Margaret Wheatley’s invitation to the learning journey)


“Detroit is a place of stark and compelling contrasts and contradictions. Once the fourth largest city in America that glowed with the promise of industrialization, it is now an embodied prophecy of the post-industrial world, a world where:


  • citizens have been abandoned by their government and corporations
  • factories that employed tens of thousands of workers now lie in ruins
  • 1/3 of the land once filled with homes and neighborhoods is now grassy fields
  • public schools are shuttered and closed
  • drugs, high crime, and criminalization by the authorities plague youth and destroy their future


Like abandoned citizens everywhere, when people realize that no one is coming to help, the possibility of community arises. As people stop looking outside themselves and turn to one another, they discover the richness of resources to be found within themselves, their cultures and their land. Nowhere in the Western world is this discovery of community-as-resource more vibrant than in Detroit.”


recommended reading at

Brave New World - stories from the new paradigm

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What to Do When the Oceans Rise

What to Do When the Oceans Rise | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

The costs of either rebuilding or relocating in response are enormous but unavoidable. Furthermore, since the economies of many coastal communities are based on fisheries and tourism, the impacts of anthropogenic climate change threaten their long-term sustainability.


Given their vulnerability, coastal communities are on the front line of global warming. But do they have the capacity to adapt to so much environmental change? Do their responses to past challenges suggest strategies for coping with future change? Can we predict which communities are most vulnerable and help them to become more resilient?

 


Via Complexity Digest, David Hodgson
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Re-thinking Progress: The Circular Economy

There's a world of opportunity to re-think and re-design the way we make stuff.


Ellen MacArthur on sustainable economy.

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America’s Deficit Attention Disorder

America’s Deficit Attention Disorder | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Joblessness can easily be eliminated by putting the unemployed and underemployed to work meeting a vast range of unmet human needs from rebuilding and greening our physical infrastructure to providing essential human services, eliminating dependence on fossil fuels, and converting to systems of local organic food production. If the primary constraint is money, the Federal Reserve can be directed to create it and channel it to priority projects through a national infrastructure bank—a move that avoids enriching the bankers and does not create more debt.

 

In addition, we must:

 

1. Break up concentrations of unaccountable power.
2. Shift the economic priority from making money to serving life by replacing financial indicators with living wealth indicators as the basis for evaluating economic performance.
3. Eliminate extremes of wealth and poverty to create a true middle-class society.
4. Build a culture of mutual trust and caring.
5. Create a system of economic incentives that reward those who do productive work and penalize predatory financial speculation.
6. Restructure the global economy into a planetary system of networked bioregional economies that share information and technology and organize to live within their respective environmental means.

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Shareable: How to Be an Urban Change Agent, Shareable Style

Shareable: How to Be an Urban Change Agent, Shareable Style | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

There's a movement – or two, or many – under foot. It goes by myriad names and comes in an array colors. The common thread, though, involves citizens stepping up to better their surroundings, to create safer, more livable, and more environmentally sound urban environments. According to the folks at Pattern Cities, some popular monikers include “guerilla urbanism,” “pop-up urbanism,” "new urbanism," “changescaping,” or “D.I.Y. urbanism.” They, however, prefer the “tactical urbanism” approach which is defined with five specific criteria:

 

A deliberate, phased approach to instigating change;

 

The offering of local solutions for local planning challenges;

 

Short-term commitment and realistic expectations;

 

Low-risks, with a possibly a high reward; and

 

The development of social capital between citizens and the building of organizational capacity between public-private institutions, non-profits, and their constituents.

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