Arrival Cities
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Arrival Cities
being an immigrant or living in a "slum" is a feature not a bug
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Learning to Connect the Dots: Developing Children’s Systems Literacy

Learning to Connect the Dots: Developing Children’s Systems Literacy | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

How can can adults nurture children’s capacity to “connect the dots” through everyday conversations and activities? How can educators build an environment that leads children to see the patterns that make a difference? In this article, educator and writer Linda Booth Sweeney points out that thinking about systems means paying attention to the interrelationships, patterns, and dynamics that surround us – and that children are naturally attuned to this. In cultivating systems literacy, you build upon this natural understanding to help promote this integrated way of thinking for the children in your life.


Via David Hodgson
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David Hodgson's curator insight, February 21, 2013 11:19 AM

How can can adults nurture children’s capacity to “connect the dots” through everyday conversations and activities? How can educators build an environment that leads children to see the patterns that make a difference? In this article, educator and writer Linda Booth Sweeney points out that thinking about systems means paying attention to the interrelationships, patterns, and dynamics that surround us – and that children are naturally attuned to this. In cultivating systems literacy, you build upon this natural understanding to help promote this integrated way of thinking for the children in your life.

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Neighborhoods and Urban Fractals – The Building Blocks of Sustainable Cities

Neighborhoods and Urban Fractals – The Building Blocks of Sustainable Cities | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Realizing Natural Capital for a sustainable city or ecopolis: Urban systems are largely unplanned with only incidental (though crucial) relationships to the bioregions on which they are ultimately dependent.

 

Urbanisation is spreading across the face of the planet at an unprecedented rate. Most of it is opportunistic; ad hoc development and shanty towns rather than master plans. Virtually none of it, planned or otherwise, incorporates the elements of natural capital that are needed to create sustainable cities. Every time a new piece of urban fabric is created, or an existing piece is patched up and reworked, it may add to the value of the real estate but subtracts from the ecological health of the urban area. As each conurbation grows it diminishes the biological wealth of its region. Globally, the entire urban system trends towards becoming increasingly dysfunctional.

 

Paul Downton - Architect, Writer, Urban Evolutionary - explains cultural fractals and pocket neighbourhoods.


Culture is a living system of human relationships that expresses itself in language, arts, tool-making and social organisation, including politics and economics.


Urban fractals should include ecology: Design guidelines for non-human species. Each neighbourhood and precinct scale piece of the city should be an “urban fractal”, containing the essential characteristics that we want to see in the whole urban system, including nature, ecosystem services, and urban agriculture.


One can envisage that with each “pocket” within the neighbourhood containing both social and biologically productive or viable space the total socio-biological performance of the fractal would be enhanced.


Our cities need to be “greener”, incorporating and being incorporated by nature and ideally, operating within the framework and limitation of pre-industrial ecological systems. They need to greatly reduce (and ultimately help to heal) damage from global warming.

 

Overall, what’s needed is an approach that allows for individual initiative, creativity and diversity but ensures that all the individual initiatives are related to each other in ways that are practical and effective. So let a thousand fractal flowers bloom – and include all the bugs that make an ecosystem work.


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Community Sufficiency Technologies

In the market we have a feed back loop that rewards efficiency of scale . . . bigger is better . . . and simpler is better. We can balance that with local systems of production, owned by the consumers of what they produce, because that creates a feed back loop that rewards efficiencies of integration . . .

 

Imagine a system of gardens and greenhouses that produced enough food for the entire neighborhood (Neighborhoods already own much of what is required). Imagine that anyone in the neighborhood could get a share of that food by doing what they enjoy . . . fixing cars, reading to kids, cooking, sewing, carpentry, home repair, gardening, making cheese . . .

 

Once you start an integrated system of production, it gets better the more things you can integrate . . . and, instead of labor being a cost, in this system, the more people that contribute, the less each person has to do.

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The science of cities: Life in the concrete jungle

The science of cities: Life in the concrete jungle | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
Nathan Phillips, an ecologist at Boston University in Massachusetts, and his colleagues are using roof-top data obtained from skyscrapers to model how carbon dioxide and other gases move through the city, as compared to rural areas.

The work is part of an interdisciplinary project to study Boston's 'metabolism' — how elements are exchanged between natural and human systems. Phillips and his team are now focusing on atmospheric carbon — particularly carbon dioxide and methane. Next, they plan to look at carbon in the city's soils and water, and to track the flow of water, nitrogen and pollutants. “The goal is to understand the function of a major city,” Phillips says. (...)

Using ecological methods to tease apart those relationships can improve urban areas for people as well as natural systems, says Phillips. “The scientific study of cities should yield practical benefits in terms of making our cities more sustainable,” he says.
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Healthy Interactions: Also see Pollution and Sustainability

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A new kinder, open collaborative justice system is possible

Our justice system is problematic, people get sent to prison and get traumatized for life, family members get ripped from their family as they spend time in prison, innocent people languish in jail, and many poor people end up in jail more because they don’t have proper representation. Its a punitive system, where we feel like it is ok to treat people terribly because they are now ‘bad’. Its a system based on power and control of elements of criminal members of society, when what is considered criminal may not be widely agreed on within the society, e.g. usage of drugs


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Cherry Blossom Happiness Factor of City-Centric Inner Intelligence

Cherry Blossom Happiness Factor of City-Centric Inner Intelligence | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

On the broadest scale, we need to create a life-long learning system that optimizes human potential with appropriate attention and intention. Developing our citizen intelligences will determine the extent to which our cities will be sustainable. To do this in an evolutionarily respectful way, we must design our education system(s) so that it allows individual, family and cultural variation. Such variation needs simple rules that allow learners to experience learning unique to their potentials (ie. not one size fits all) while at the same time creating citizens able to contribute to the achievement of city, in ways that we can each and all enjoy the happiness that cherry blossoms bring.

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