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being an immigrant or living in a "slum" is a feature not a bug
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Cooperatives as Business Models of the Future

Cooperatives as Business Models of the Future | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Cooperatives as Business Models of the Future - When the International Year of Cooperatives (IYC) concluded last week, some of the overwhelming success stories highlighted at a two-day interactive session came both from developing and developed countries,...

Dame Pauline Green, president of the International Cooperative Alliance...

In Brazil, Green said, a clearly defined government policy aimed at helping rural people, through cooperative businesses, has seen a massive reduction in poverty in the rural areas of the sprawling South American nation.

In Kenya, cooperatives account for nearly half of the country’s gross domestic product (GDP), while in Rwanda the cooperative economy has gone from zero to eight percent of GDP over the last 10 years.

The world’s largest 300 cooperatives, primarily in the insurance and food and agriculture sectors, generated revenues of 1.6 trillion dollars and employed nearly 100 million people worldwide.

 

Asked if the cooperative model of enterprise may well be one of the answers to the global economic crisis, Green told IPS, “Without doubt the cooperative business model offers a proven solution to this global economic crisis we are mired in.”

In the UK, she said, schools have become one of the fastest-growing parts of the cooperative economy.


“Renewable energy cooperatives have been springing up all over the globe, and of course media is another area which benefits from the cooperative model because it ensures independent journalism remains viable,” she noted.

 

ddrrnt's insight:

https://twitter.com/toughLoveforx/status/356034145530556418

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The Crowd Sourced City | Sustainable Cities Collective

The Crowd Sourced City | Sustainable Cities Collective | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Though larger, Detroit’s problems are analogous to many other cities throughout the United States. The Detroit region has been promised so many revivals, renaissances, and renewals; the city is as littered with failed urban revitalization projects as it is empty houses. Yet Detroiters are quietly working to solve problems on their own. People are rebuilding their neighborhoods without large sums of money, much organizational support, or assistance from city government. Call it the crowd-sourced city, and it is a slow process, but a beautiful one. Empty industrial buildings have become artists’ spaces and markets, vacant lots, farms and gardens, abandoned apartments, condos, and empty buildings filled with new offices. Neighborhood organizations are quietly utilizing online tools to better connect members. The old barriers of race and class remain but a tentative regional discussion has begun. What is the future of the region? Can the pattern of growth in the region continue as it has during the past 60 years?


by ECPA Urban Planning

Sustainable Cities Collective

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Can cities help you forget your troubles? C’mon, get happy!

Can cities help you forget your troubles? C’mon, get happy! | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

We’re starting to get our arms around some of the bigger public health issues connecting society with the built environment, particularly on the obesity, diabetes and depression fronts.


Now, we’re starting to get our arms around some of the bigger public health issues connecting society with the built environment, particularly on the obesity, diabetes and depression fronts. Proponents of gross national happiness to augment gross national product would like to see our society focused on conserving instead of consuming and connectivity instead of distrust. (...)


And it’s interesting how some things go full circle, with a healthy society making for a healthy economy. ‎60% of East Coast developers say, “to stay competitive, they are shifting away from bigger traditional home designs to conservative pedestrian-oriented mixed-use neighbourhoods.” People get more enduring happiness from experiences in their neighbourhood than possessions in their home. (...)


“A good city is like a good party – people stay much longer than really necessary because they are enjoying themselves,” per Jan Gehl, author of a City for People, and leader of Copenhagen’s transformation to a bikeable, walkable city. Gehl encourages urban design from the perspective of the five senses, taken at walking speed. This eye-level approach does much to address the needs — and the happiness — of the individual.

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Labs: Designing the future

Labs: Designing the future | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

"In the spirit of a creative, open innovation system, the Lab is a structure that not only thinks, but also does. Traditionally a place for scientists to test hypotheses that lead to potential breakthroughs, the Lab has been re-purposed to address elusive “wicked problems” in society. In this version (sometimes called the innovation, design or change Lab), substitute the scientific method with design thinking as the rigorous and repeatable protocol; swap beakers and Bunsen burners for sticky notes and white boards; and shift from single expertise to multifaceted expertise (usually representing a combination of business, design and humanities – in MaRS’ case, add science & tech as well as entrepreneurs of all sorts).


In these Labs, teams are experimenting with alternative solutions to real-world challenges such as water sanitization, carbon neutrality and age-friendly societies. And just like scientific breakthroughs, when these solutions succeed, they are game changing."


There is a considerable list of Labs to check out, alongside further reading: here.


By Lisa Torjman

@marsdd
February 29, 2012

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Growing Rogue Proves Urban Farming Strengthens Communities

Growing Rogue Proves Urban Farming Strengthens Communities | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Growing Rogue has started its first urban farm at a large apartment complex, (Singleton Housing), near 19th Ave. and Maryland in Phoenix. When Kristopher Corter and Andrew Pisher got started with the farm the people in the neighborhood tried warning them that the neighborhood was a dangerous one, that there was a lot of crime and drugs in that area and there was concern about people vandalizing the farm or stealing the large drums that stored the soil and plants. With confidence Mr. Corter and Mr. Pisher continued their work shoveling dirt and soil into the food drums in the large covered parking lot out back and in time residents of the apartment complex wanted to help and passersby would see the work and stop to help shovel soil. In less than two weeks of work neighbors are already commenting on how they have seen less crime and drug related activity and the neighborhood feels a little safer already.

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Smart Tech For Scaled-Up Urban Agriculture | Earthtechling

Smart Tech For Scaled-Up Urban Agriculture | Earthtechling | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

High-yield greenhouse tech developed by the Swedish government has found a home in Plantagon's large-scale, vertical greenhouses designed for cities.


It has been estimated that by 2050, as much as 80 percent of the earth’s population will reside in cities. Considering that, by conservative estimates, the total population will total 2 billion, this question is, how are we going to feed our cities in an ecologically friendly way?  (...)


When plants reach the bottom of the greenhouse, they are harvested via a harvesting machine. After the harvest, the trays and pots are disinfected, and the pots are separated and replanted with another seed for the next round in the cultivation loop. (...)


The idea is that such large-scale greenhouses can work symbiotically with the built environment of the city, including its industrial buildings. Greenhouses can make use of the surplus heat produced by such buildings to become more energy efficient, suck up carbon dioxide from the air, and make use of food waste for fertilizer. (...)



via | Earthtechling

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Feeding the World Sustainably: Agroecology vs. Industrial Agriculture (Infographic by the Christensen Fund)

Feeding the World Sustainably: Agroecology vs. Industrial Agriculture (Infographic by the Christensen Fund) | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

But the graphic also shows how agroecological approaches—including the incorporation of livestock and crops, integrated pest management, and cover cropping—can not only reduce the burden of agriculture on the environment, but also improve nutrition and increase incomes. Agroecology can actually conserve and protect both soil and water—through terracing, contour farming, intercropping, and agroforestry—and absorb greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide. And agroecological practices could double and triple yields in poorer areas, where many farms lack irrigation infrastructure, or are situated on hillsides or other difficult farming sites.


Via David Hodgson
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How Open Data Initiatives Can Improve City Life

How Open Data Initiatives Can Improve City Life | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
Building apps that make use of government data may not be feasible for many cities, but opening that data up to the developer community has proven fruitful for some.


Major city governments across North America are looking for ways to share civic data — which normally resides behind secure firewalls — with private developers who can leverage it to serve city residents via web and mobile apps. Cities can spend on average between $20,000 and $50,000 — even as much as $100,000 — to cover the costs of opening data, but that’s a small price to pay when you consider how much is needed to develop a custom application that might not be nearly as useful.


15 Feb 11 by Aliza Sherman

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The Internet Is the New Town Hall and Soon Cities Will Be Listening

The Internet Is the New Town Hall and Soon Cities Will Be Listening | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

"Sentiment analysis" of social media could change the way you report potholes forever.


The challenge for cities is how they might parse social media sentiment about not just one dish detergent (or one frequently Googled query during flu season), but about numerous interlocking indexes of civic life. Are parents in Chicago supportive of the teachers’ strike? What are New York subway riders saying about that new trash program? Or Los Angelenos about the crackdown on pot dispensaries? Is there a flare-up of graffiti concern on the west side of the city? Or a collision on the east side about to erupt into an all-out traffic jam?

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Jugaad: A New Growth Formula for Corporate America

Frugal innovation is a hot topic today as post-downturn corporate America looks for ways to do more for less, while serving broader markets.


Jugaad-minded entrepreneurs turn adversity — such as widespread scarcity of natural and financial resources in India — into an opportunity to innovate and create more valuable products and services at less cost for more people.


How can Western organizations concretely put Jugaad in practice? 


Thrift not waste. This first rule — which promotes frugality — helps tackle scarcity of all forms of resources.


Inclusion, not exclusion. This second rule helps entrepreneurial organizations to put inclusiveness into practice — by tightly connecting with, and harnessing, the growing diversity that permeates their communities of customers, employees, and partners.


Bottom-up participation, not top-down command and control. This third rule drives collaboration. CEOs who tend to act as conductors must learn to facilitate collaborative improvisation just as players in jazz bands do.


Flexible thinking and action, not linear planning. This fourth rule facilitates flexibility in thinking and action. Jugaad-practicing firms are highly adaptable as they aren’t wedded to any single business model and pursue multiple options at any time.


Also see the 6 Principles of Jugaad innovation on our FB page.

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To Raise A Generation Of Creative Kids, Let Them Make Their Own Stories

To Raise A Generation Of Creative Kids, Let Them Make Their Own Stories | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

For years, stories have been predominately linear push communications. Elite storytelling auteurs would weave their masterful tales. The great stories were devoured page-by-page, scene-by-scene by an engrossed, yet passive audience. However, kids growing up now will never know this purely passive form of content consumption.


Parents and the media industry need to stimulate a new form of storytelling. We need stories that invite participation, remixing, mashing-up, playing, and creating. These types of stories are a great way to help kids find and understand their place in the world. As kids play with their stories, the more they discover themselves. Through triggering key capabilities like role playing and imagination, kids can more clearly see their place in the society around them.


Via David Hodgson
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Parks Are Part of Our Healthcare System

Parks Are Part of Our Healthcare System | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

“Parks are a part of our healthcare system,” said Dr. Daphne Miller, a professor of family and community medicine, University of California, San Francisco, at the Greater & Greener: Reimagining Parks for 21st Century Cities, a conference in New York City. She said these green spaces are crucial to solving hypertension, anxiety, depression, diabetes — “the diseases of indoor living.” The more someone spends outdoors, the less likely they are to suffer from mental or physical disorders. But she said parks officials and the medical profession still needs more data to take aim at the many “naysayers on the other side” who don’t believe in what every landscape architect values.


Via nancercize, Kirk Fontaine
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Kirk Fontaine's comment, August 25, 2012 7:08 PM
thanks nancericize More attention and funds should be focused on the outdoor resources that are healthy as well cheap - it is a no-brainer
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Re-thinking Progress: The Circular Economy

There's a world of opportunity to re-think and re-design the way we make stuff.


Ellen MacArthur on sustainable economy.

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Out of India's Trash Heaps, More Than a Shred of Dignity

Out of India's Trash Heaps, More Than a Shred of Dignity | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
Pune, India, has developed a a waste-management approach that is improving the environment, as well as the livelihoods and social standing of some of the city’s poorest inhabitants.

 

Waste-pickers are often uneducated, rural migrants who sift through trash heaps or landfills, looking for plastics and glass that they sell to middlemen by weight, who send them to be recycled.  This informal system results in recycling rates of almost 50 percent for plastics (as compared with 8.2 percent in the United States) — which is why activists call waste-pickers “invisible environmentalists.”

 

Waste-picking is full of occupational hazards. Waste-pickers sifting through trash with bare hands encounter rusty metal, cut glass, needles and menstrual blood; their life expectancy may be a decade or more below the average. With a daily income of 60 rupees (one dollar) in Pune, most cannot afford proper meals or medical care. Police and security guards harass them, particularly women. Governments offers little protection.

It took years for K.K.P.K.P. to mobilize the waste-pickers, who were scattered and reluctant to take time off work for meetings. As the group came together, however, they found a sympathetic ear in the Pune Municipal Corporation (P.M.C.), the city’s governing body.

 

That led to the innovation that changed Chandani’s life and has evolved into a waste-management approach that others can learn from. In 2007, the K.K.P.K.P. and Pune’s government got together to create a cooperative called Solid Waste Collection and Handling (Swach). The idea was to engage waste-pickers to handle almost all of the city’s waste, a remarkable departure from other cities, where private contractors haul waste to landfills with trucks. The question was: Could Swach save the Pune government lots of money, improve the environment and improve livelihoods for some of the city’s poorest inhabitants? The answer appears to be yes to all three.

ddrrnt's insight:

thanks to @toughLoveforx :

https://plus.google.com/u/0/114944409106623979163/posts/eH1KYEBHppg

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Apopka Family Learning Center

Apopka Family Learning Center is an inclusive community where children and families of all races, cultures, and walks of life are welcomed. We believe that family and community offer the best support system for healthy social, academic, civic, and ethical development. By offering educational opportunities to the entire family, we create families who value education, self-reliance, and community service.


@AFLCenter

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Can Aid Agencies and Development Banks Effectively Help the Urban Poor?

Can Aid Agencies and Development Banks Effectively Help the Urban Poor? | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

The Asian Coalition for Community Action is challenging the top-down Big Aid funding model by providing small grants to low-income communities for the initiatives of their choosing.


Since 2009, ACCA has developed a working finance system in which urban poor organizations have the power to choose what they will undertake. ACCA has provided small grants to 950 community-initiatives to upgrade "slums" or informal settlements in 165 cities in 19 nations. Up to $3,000 of grant finance is available, and communities use this to, for example, construct or improve their water supply systems or toilets, drains, roads, paths or bridges, community centers, household waste management, playgrounds or parks. Up to $40,000 has been available for larger initiatives at the city scale. (...)


If large, centralized development assistance agencies cannot work directly with urban poor groups and their community organizations, can they learn to work with and through intermediary institutions, which are on the ground financing, working with, and accountable to urban poor groups? (...)



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Cities: Salvation Or Infestation? : NPR

Cities: Salvation Or Infestation? : NPR | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

There are lots of lines of evidence telling us our current model for cities is unsustainable. Does that mean cities themselves are the problem and we should all move back to the farm?


Urban agriculture and rooftop farms could be part of the solution. There are proposals to make buildings more like plants so that they can get everything they need right where they sit. There are opportunities for using Big Data to make urban energy consumption hyper efficient. In a thousand-thousand ways — some big and some small — there are opportunities to reimagine how cities work and how we work within them. That is pretty awesome.


With seven billion people and counting, it is likely that the density and efficiencies cities enable might be our only hope for a vibrant, high-tech and sustainable civilization. And with 70 percent of the world's population expected to move into cities by 2050, do we really have any choice?


Adam Frank @AdamFrank4

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Terreform ONE Proposes Covering NYC With Vertical Gardens & Urban Farms to Become Self-Sufficient

Terreform ONE Proposes Covering NYC With Vertical Gardens & Urban Farms to Become Self-Sufficient | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

In response to global urban population, Terreform, Inc.* has come up with an innovative way for New York City to deal with the issues that arise from this world wide problem. The plan, called New York City Steady State (NYCSS), calls for a system that would render New York entirely self-sufficient, reducing its ecological and carbon footprint exponentially. The new green plan is based on intensive data collected by NYCSS about the city’s supply and demand, and would rely heavy on urban farming.


via Inhabitat

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Technology and the democratisation of development

Technology and the democratisation of development | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

In 1993 the number of mobile subscribers in Africa numbered in the hundreds of thousands. By 1998 that had crept to four million. Today there are an estimated 735 million with penetration running at around the 70% mark. Not bad in less than 20 years. (...)


Mobile phone ownership among the communities many of them serve presents new opportunities to increase the reach and efficiency of their work. Simply being able to send messages to coordinate meetings, or to remind people of key messages, can save hours – even days – on the road.


Community healthcare workers can also stay in better touch with the hospital when they’re back in their villages. Farmers can access advice and market information directly from their fields. Citizens can report corruption, or engage in debate. Births can be registered. Illegal logging can be recorded and reported. It’s safe to say that mobile phones have touched every sector of development in one way or another. It has become so ubiquitous that, in just a few short years, many development workers can hardly imagine life without them.


via Build it Kenny, and they will come...

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Pioneering a Holistic Promise for Cities – Next American City

Pioneering a Holistic Promise for Cities – Next American City | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

A program in Kalamazoo, Mich. offers free tuition for students to attend in-state colleges, so long as they promise to stay in the city. It’s a model that struggling smaller cities around the country may want to adopt.

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Restorative Justice | Mural Arts Program

Restorative Justice | Mural Arts Program | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Restorative Justice is a concept of justice that involves the victim, the offender, and the community in the healing process. Globally, restorative justice practices can be viewed as an alternative to incarceration and revenge, enabling all parties to communicate, attempt to understand what has happened to the community, and then proceed to healing and restoration. These tasks can be accomplished through various means, from traditional talking circles to formal victim/offender mediation conferences. This is a difficult process and requires thoughtfulness, awareness, and inner strength. Restorative justice practices help to unify communities affected by crime and to transform community members divided by the criminal justice system.


The Mural Arts Program incorporates the concepts of restorative justice through art instruction, mural making, and community service work within the criminal justice system. Current inmates, ex-offenders, and juvenile delinquents are given the opportunity to learn new skills and make a positive contribution to their communities to repair the prior harm they may have caused. In the Mural Arts Restorative Justice program there is a growing emphasis on re-entry, reclamation of civic spaces, and the use of art to give voice to people who have consistently felt disconnected from society.

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How One Man’s Vision for Las Vegas Might Change our Cities Forever

How One Man’s Vision for Las Vegas Might Change our Cities Forever | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

 Tony Hsieh, the 38-year old founder of online shoe retailer Zappos, is spending $350 million to redevelop downtown Las Vegas.


When Zappos required a new corporate headquarters, Hsieh decided to locate in renovated office space in the City’s former City Hall building. This move bucks the trend of other tech companies and embraces an emerging change in city dweller’s lifestyle choices that Hsieh further seeks to foster.


Hsieh saw that there are essentially two ways in which a major organization can interact with the built environment. They can take the approach that many other tech companies have and build a new, self-sufficient campus filled with all the amenities it’s employees could possibly desire in a lush, isolated setting. Or, they could choose to locate in a more built up area and become part of the community around it, encouraging its employees to interact with others around them and function not only as a workplace but also as a node of knowledge and ideas within the neighbourhood.


Hsieh is putting forward one solution to help solve a problem that has challenged North American cities for decades: how do we reverse an entrenched sprawl-based development program for one that is more supportive of existing urban areas? The traditional approach has been government land use policy, zoning controls, development restrictions to try to limit the amount of new suburban housing each year, targeted tax breaks for building downtown, and other top-down mechanisms for trying to shape the city region. Although success varies by place, there has been limited success and many downtowns have continued to languish even while their populations continue to balloon. Hsieh is offering what promises to be a bottom-up solution, recognizing that cities, corporations and citizens all want healthy, thriving downtowns. The missing component was the developers to get the ball rolling.

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An Omnivore’s Approach To Achieving Energy Security

In 2011, the average American spent $732 to heat their home with natural gas.  In contrast, they spent $2,535 to heat their homes with oil.  Ouch! That's a recipe for bankruptcy. It's also pretty good example of why specialization can hurt you.


What’s required to be an energy omnivore? The ability to:

  • produce a home’s electricity from a variety of fuels.
  • heat and cool a home with oil, wood, natural gas, passive solar, electricity, and geo-exchange.
  • power a vehicle with gasoline, natural gas, diesel, bio diesel, and electricity.

As you can see, this is a pretty extensive list. It’s likely much more expensive to implement than most people can afford at the individual level. Further, much of this omnivorous production might be best done at the community level rather than at the household/complex level.

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Jeffrey Sachs on Immigration

Jeffrey Sachs on Immigration | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

"Continued immigration, across cultural and economic divides, is not only inevitable but also broadly beneficial. Immigrants deepen the ties that hold our world together. Today's migrants don't abandon their homelands, but bridge their homelands with their adopted countries. They make links, economic, cultural, and social. Immigration needs to be steady and sure, neither a floodgate nor a trickle. A floodgate would disrupt the long-term processes of social trust and institution building in the host and source countries. A trickle would allow a build-up of global pressures and illegal population movements to an intolerable degree." ~ Jeffery Sachs at Columbia University, New York in 2007.


highlights from his speech.

Arrival Cities on FB.

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Warren Karlenzig: Collective Intelligence--Cities as Global Intelligence Platform

Social media and collaborative technologies--layered with smart systems combining geo-location data with human experience--will make cities the driving sustainability force in a dawning planetary era. Cities will anticipate new risks with rapid urban systems innovation based upon crowdsourcing, virtual and physical communities, and transparent markets sensitive to full carbon and resource costs. Creatively leveraging collective intelligence for clean energy, low carbon mobility and sustainable food and water, the new urban grid will enable high local quality of life, lifelong learning and vibrant green economies.


scoop'd from theurbn.com


“What is the one thing you can do to make a city more sustainable? That’s easy. Stop asking the question: What is the one thing you can do to make a city more sustainable?” How we should really be tackling the debate and issue is by first recognizing that cities are hyper-complex and none exactly alike. Meaning, every single one will have different solutions and every single one will need different solutions as it changes over time. Although these complexities and diversities sound like a strain on our ability to combat the problems faced, Warren Karlenzig argues that the dynamics and inter-connections of urban areas are what give them their “strength against shocks and stresses”. They are our gift and our curse.


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