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Resilience Through Placemaking

Resilience Through Placemaking | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

A common thread found in Resilience theory is that of community strength. A community’s ability to survive and even thrive during tough times is largely decided both in the way that community builds itself around its physical places and also in the way people work and band together to create those spaces.

The art of place-making is arguably the best demonstration of community resilience at work. By definition placemaking involves the residents of a community – it’s not the product of an architect’s pen but rather the result of a community-designer-builder collaboration over time.

ddrrnt's insight:

"Placemaking co-evolves with imagination, inspiration, interaction, individual agency, inference, information, insights, interdependence, infrastructure and intangible assets." @JohnKellden - http://goo.gl/rzodgK

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Shareable: Region in Italy Reaches 30% Coop Economy

Shareable: Region in Italy Reaches 30% Coop Economy | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

The Emilia-Romagna region in Northern Italy is one of the richest in Europe, known for its high-end car manufacturing. While Emilia-Romagna is one of the most economically successful regions in Europe, it is also one of the most cooperative regions in the world. Nearly two of every three of its 4.5 million citizens are members of a cooperative. Cooperatives support around 30% of the region’s GDP, making it a stellar example of a large-scale cooperative economy. As with Mondragon Cooperative Corporation in Spain, the cooperative economy is strongly bolstered by networked relationships which also make cooperatives more resilient in economic crises. Learn more by watching the prezi below.

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Resilient cities need resilient citizens

Resilient cities need resilient citizens | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

... psychology professor David DeSteno ... talking to an audience of hundreds at a summit on urban resilience convened by PopTech and the Rockefeller Foundation, The City Resilient, last week. “Humans respond to disruptions in one of two ways,” he said. “We stand together, or we stand alone.” And it turns out that choosing the first strategy affords the best long term outcome, according to evolutionary and mathematical simulations, DeSteno said.

....

A study conducted by the Associated Press and NORC at the University of Chicago on Resilience in the Wake of Superstorm Sandy released last week and presented by its authors at the Brooklyn summit found that “individuals in slowly recovering neighborhoods are less likely to believe that, generally speaking, most people can be trusted.” Their counterparts in the faster-to-recover neighborhoods were more likely to think the storm brought out the best in people and reported lower levels of hoarding food and water, looting, stealing, and vandalism.

 

As DeSteno said in his talk, choosing to stand alone, choosing to hoard, price-gouge, and steal, has a long-term negative effect for the community…and the individual: “In the long-run, it’s a poor strategy. The social bonds and support of a society — your social bonds and support — fall apart,” he said.

 

So clearly we need to stand together, we need to create a social infrastructure that encourages people to cooperate and feel compassionate toward one another.

 

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A Vision of a Carbon-Zero Urban Future: An Interview with Alex Steffen

A Vision of a Carbon-Zero Urban Future: An Interview with Alex Steffen | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Alex Steffen calls himself a planetary futurist. That means he has confronted some grim realities in the nearly 10 years since he founded Worldchanging.com, an online publication that pioneered coverage of climate change and related issues in the early years of the 21st century.


His most recent book, which came out November 26, is called Carbon Zero: Imagining Cities That Can Save the Planet. In it, he lays out his case that "remaking the world’s wealthiest cities over the next 20 years may prove the best—perhaps the only—chance we have of avoiding planetary catastrophe." (...)


Steffen:


To a really large degree the consumption choices that we can make are dictated by the systems around us. Whether or not we can walk or bike or take transit to work or to school. Whether or not we can reasonably live without owning every thing we might ever want to use. Whether or not we have access to food that is grown in ways that are more sustainable. The list goes on and on of things that are bounded by the urban systems in which we live. (...)


Ruggedization is simply making stuff that is harder to break. Many of the systems we depend on, including stuff our lives depend on, are extremely brittle. They’ve been optimized for a very narrow set of circumstances, which means that the minute something happens that’s outside those normal expectations, they break, they collapse. This is not a good thing. There are certain systems you want to make sure work no matter what. You want your water supply to be safe no matter what. You want medical care to be available no matter what. So the first step is just making sure the things you cannot afford to have fail, you future-proof.


by Sarah Goodyear

21 Nov 2012

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In praise of resilience

In praise of resilience | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

For decades, people who concern themselves with the world's "wicked problems" -- interconnected issues like environmental degradation, poverty, food security and climate change -- have marched together under the banner of "sustainability"....


Among a growing number of scientists, social innovators, community leaders, nongovernmental organizations, philanthropies, governments and corporations, a new dialogue is emerging around a new idea, resilience: how to help vulnerable people, organizations and systems persist, perhaps even thrive, amid unforeseeable disruptions. Where sustainability aims to put the world back into balance, resilience looks for ways to manage an imbalanced world.

(...)


Read more.


Andrew Zolli, the executive director of PopTech and Ann Marie Healy is the author, of "Resilience: Why Things Bounce Back."

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Buying Local: How It Boosts the Economy

Buying Local: How It Boosts the Economy | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

A number of researchers and organizations are taking a closer look at how money flows, and what they're finding shows the profound economic impact of keeping money in town—and how the fate of many communities around the nation and the world increasingly depend on it.


At the most basic level, when you buy local more money stays in the community. The New Economics Foundation, an independent economic think tank based in London, compared what happens when people buy produce at a supermarket vs. a local farmer's market or community supported agriculture (CSA) program and found that twice the money stayed in the community when folks bought locally. "That means those purchases are twice as efficient in terms of keeping the local economy alive," says author and NEF researcher David Boyle. (See the top 10 food trends of 2008.)


Indeed, says Boyle, many local economies are languishing not because too little cash comes in, but as a result of what happens to that money. "Money is like blood. It needs to keep moving around to keep the economy going," he says, noting that when money is spent elsewhere—at big supermarkets, non-locally owned utilities and other services such as on-line retailers—"it flows out, like a wound."

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What to Do When the Oceans Rise

What to Do When the Oceans Rise | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

The costs of either rebuilding or relocating in response are enormous but unavoidable. Furthermore, since the economies of many coastal communities are based on fisheries and tourism, the impacts of anthropogenic climate change threaten their long-term sustainability.


Given their vulnerability, coastal communities are on the front line of global warming. But do they have the capacity to adapt to so much environmental change? Do their responses to past challenges suggest strategies for coping with future change? Can we predict which communities are most vulnerable and help them to become more resilient?

 


Via Complexity Digest, David Hodgson
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DIY Urbanism - Almere Oosterwold

MVRDV‘s proposal for an urban development in Almere Oosterworld, the Netherlands, is a template for a D.I.Y. project that puts power into the hands of neighborhoods and communities. This development strategy is bottom-up, inclusive and very intuitive to the needs of individuals and their communities. It allows the design to develop organically and over a stretch of time as needs change and neighborhoods grow. MVRDV writes that the proposal “is a revolution in Dutch urban planning as it steps away from governmental dictate and invites organic urban growth in which initiatives are stimulated and inhabitants can create their own neighbourhoods including public green, urban agriculture and roads”.

 

more - http://bit.ly/MvL7PX ht @mbauwens

 

 

 

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Resilient Cities: Building Community Control

Resilient Cities: Building Community Control | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Critical Political Opportunity for Urban Centers
From a grassroots perspective, building community resilience and higher degrees of material self-sufficiency will be critical towards ensuring that communities of color weather coming ecological transitions. The basic needs of urban communities of color—such as access to potable water, healthy food, and mass transit—will otherwise be at stake in an era of heightened ecological stress.

 

“The key to truly addressing ecological crisis [is not] buying more hybrid cars but collective action towards systemic change,” says Claire Tran, the national organizer at Right To The City Alliance. “That’s what’s needed if we want to achieve community resilience in this period of ecological transition.”

 

via Urban Habitat

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Mariana Soffer's comment, July 19, 2012 3:06 AM
nice Dan
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Edible City

Edible City | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Edible City is a 72 minute documentary film that asks a few burning questions…

 

“How can we live in cities and still eat local, healthy, sustainable food?”


“How can we create jobs, build local economies, and increase food security all at the same time?”


“How can we create food systems that are economically, socially, and environmentally just?”

 

Edible City follows ten extraordinary stories exploring what’s going on in the food movement today, from the grassroots growth to the politics in Washington, D.C., from Occupy Oakland to creating community resiliency and local economic infrastructure.

 

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Climate Change, Disaster Risk, and the Urban Poor: Cities Building Resilience for a Changing World

Climate Change, Disaster Risk, and the Urban Poor: Cities Building Resilience for a Changing World | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Poor people living in slums are at particularly high risk from the impacts of climate change and natural hazards. They live on the most vulnerable lands within cities, typically areas that are deemed undesirable by others and are thus affordable. Residents are exposed to the impacts of landslides, sea-level rise, flooding, and other hazards. Exposure to risk is exacerbated by overcrowded living conditions, lack of adequate infrastructure and services, unsafe housing, inadequate nutrition, and poor health. These conditions can turn a natural hazard or change in climate into a disaster, and result in the loss of basic services, damage or destruction to homes, loss of livelihoods, malnutrition, disease, disability, and loss of life. This study analyzes the key challenges facing the urban poor given the risks associated with climate change and disasters, particularly with regard to the delivery of basic services, and identifies strategies and financing opportunities for addressing these risks. Several key findings emerge from the study and provide guidance for addressing risk:

 

1) The urban poor are on the front line. The poor are particularly vulnerable to climate change and natural hazards due to where they live within cities, and the lack of reliable basic services.

 

2) City governments are the drivers for addressing risks. Local governments play a vital role in providing basic services which are critical to improving the resilience of the urban poor.

 

3) City officials build resilience by mainstreaming risk reduction into urban management. Climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction can be best addressed and sustained over time through integration with existing urban planning and management practices.

 

4) Significant financial support is needed. Local governments need to leverage existing and new resources to meet the shortfalls in service delivery and basic infrastructure adaptation.

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Urban resilience in a time of change - Colombes

Urban resilience in a time of change - Colombes | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Agrocité is an urban agriculture programme in the suburb of Colombes, which is an underprivileged town of 84,000 inhabitants near the city of Paris. The pilot programme that started in early 2012 is designed to introduce the dynamics of urban agriculture to community life. This will reconnect neighbours to one another and their living environment, empower them, and help revitalise a neglected urban context. The project includes a micro-experimental farm, community gardens, educational and cultural spaces, and devices for energy production, composting and rainwater recycling.

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Indian cities must act now on city climate resilience plans

Indian cities must act now on city climate resilience plans | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Cities across the world, due to their rapid population growth and large-scale developmental and economic investments, are at high risk from the impacts of climate change.


Though facing serious issues, cities can offer solution by evolving climate resilience strategies which can go a long in reducing their vulnerability and ensuring sustainable development. In view of this, it is crucial to develop urban climate resilience plans that can prepare cities to face the consequences of extreme weather events like urban flooding, public health crisis and the like. Understanding the urgency, The Asian Cities Climate Change Resilience Network (ACCCRN), part of a $59 million, 7-year climate change resilience initiative supported by the Rockefeller Foundation, was launched in 2009 to create climate resilience strategies and action models in 10 cities across four countries in Asia (Thailand, Vietnam, Indonesia and India).

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We Will Have to Make Our Future Cities Both “Resilient” and "Sustainable"

We Will Have to Make Our Future Cities Both “Resilient” and "Sustainable" | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

As Bello points out , though resilience and sustainability—two of the hottest buzzwords in urban planning—are practically used interchangeably, they are in fact in some tension with each other. A resilient system bounces back from challenges, unharmed, and a big part of building in resilience includes building in ways to fail safely.Sustainability, on the other hand, means efficiency, at least in part, as designers strive to strike a balance between human needs and environmental impacts. (...)


Accordind to World Urbanization Report, the twentieth century witnessed the rapid urbanization of the world’s population. The global proportion of urban population increased from a mere 13 per cent in 1900 to 29 per cent in 1950 and, according to the 2005 Revision of World Urbanization Prospects, reached 49 per cent in 2005. Since the world is projected to continue to urbanize, 60 per cent of the global population is expected to live in cities by 2030. The rising numbers of urban dwellers give the best indication of the scale of these unprecedented trends: the urban population increased from 220 million in 1900 to 732 million in 1950, and is estimated to have reached 3.2 billion in 2005, thus more than quadrupling since 1950. According to the latest United Nations population projections, 4.9 billion people are expected to be urban dwellers in 2030.

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World's Future Prosperity linked to Disaster Resilience, says New Report - UNISDR

World's Future Prosperity linked to Disaster Resilience, says New Report - UNISDR | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

A new report by UN-Habitat links the world's future prosperity to the ability of cities to reduce risk and build resilience to adverse forces of nature.


Titled State of the World's Cities 2012/2013 - the Prosperity of Cities, the report identifies soaring unemployment, food shortages and rising prices, strains on financial institutions, insecurity and political instability as challenges to the conventional notion of cities as the home of prosperity.


The wasteful expansion of cities in "endless peripheries" leads to additional risks associated with the provision of water, physical infrastructure, transport and energy, and affects industrial production, local economies, assets and livelihoods, according to the report. (...)


Margareta Wahlström, who heads the UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction, supports UN-Habitat's approach, which takes equity and good governance into account when assessing a city's prosperity - these elements also help bolster disaster resilience.


"The findings from our own studies on cities show that low socio-economic development need not necessarily limit all resilience-building activities, especially when the central government and multilateral agencies work together to ensure the right people come together to take action," said Wahlström, referring to UNISDR's newest report, "Making Cities Resilient 2012 -- My city is getting ready! A global snapshot of how local governments reduce disaster risk," which was launched in tandem with the UN-Habitat report.

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Cities and biodiversity: a call for up-scaled action

Cities and biodiversity: a call for up-scaled action | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Urban design and public space influence us in profound and multifarious ways – our health, fitness, diets, social life, mobility, psychology, aspirations, etc. Indeed, our relationship with biodiversity is a strong determinant of our psychological and physical wellbeing. Architects, engineers, and planners, endorsed by foresighted mayors and informed by the voices of science and local community groups, can together reconcile urbanisation with nature conservation, to create more sustainable, biodiverse and resilient cities. Our generation could render a positive and enduring legacy for the benefit of future generations.


Via David Hodgson
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How to Bootstrap an Informal Local Economy

How to Bootstrap an Informal Local Economy | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Today's Resilient Community letter is from Marcus Wynne.  He's been on the road, looking at fiercely independent, rural communities across the US, to divine what makes them tick.

 

There’s been an explosion in the use of community time banks, local currencies, and barter networks all across the US and EU. In some cases, like depression ravaged Spain and Greece, informal local economies are starting to displace the global financial economy.

...

What was the need? People need to eat. Some don’t have money or benefits or sufficient self-sustainable resources to provide all they need for themselves. So they trade what do have, or else make or manufacture or provide a service. It’s local in structure, defined essentially by proximity and personal acquaintance with the hub. It provides all of the basic elements of a resilient community: security, food/water, transportation, medical/health, energy.

 

How this differs from “intentional communities” is that this community sprang up out of need. It wasn’t a group of people who decided one day to go and start this; it grew out of need and trust established through meeting needs over a number of years.


Via Elle D'Coda
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Resilient economies, resilient cities: An interview with Richard Florida

Resilient economies, resilient cities: An interview with Richard Florida | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

"First, to increase technological innovation, we need to make the core products of the industrial age—housing, cars, energy—cheaper if we want to fuel demand for the new technologies and industries of the future, from health care and biotechnology to new information, educational, and entertainment industries. By increasing the demand, we’ll create a new market for innovative products and services. Cities can lead this charge by fostering the sectors and industries that are creating sustainable products for the future

 

Second, to develop new systems and methods of innovation, we have to build a new infrastructure that adapts to the new realities of collaboration and creativity. We need new infrastructure that can dramatically speed the movement of goods, people, and ideas. Cities need to lead the charge in advocating for more high-speed rail and a deeper, better digital backbone."

 

and the 4T rule is still more than accurate :

 

" 4-T’s—technology, talent, tolerance, and territory assets. Even ten years after writing The Rise of the Creative Class, I still believe that the 4-T’s provide the best blueprint for how cites can compete and prosper in the creative age."


Via axelletess
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BioLite - Cookstove that also generates electricity

BioLite - Cookstove that also generates electricity | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

The decentralization of electricity generation is a critical component of a resilient global "brain", not to mention having light and comfort. BioLite has created a low-cost biomass cookstove that, by converting waste heat into electricity, reduces smoke emissions by up to 95% while simultaneously providing users with the capability to charge mobile phones and LED lights.


Via The Asymptotic Leap
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Networked Resilient Communities

Networked Resilient Communities | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Networked Resilient Communities integrate the production of food, energy, and water into the community’s fabric. They smartly leverage the best technologies and methodologies (e.g. permaculture) to maximize the quality, quantity, and availability of essential goods.

 

Networked Resilient Communities aren’t insular. They understand a larger world exists and even if the economy is depressed, they are actively entrepreneurial. They seek new sources of income. However, they don’t do this by courting large businesses. They do this by helping small artisinal businesses and co-ops export goods and services to the larger world. A group of nimble, small businesses like these produce a diverse income stream (where if one goes dry, another takes its place). They also can be flexible on terms (trade, barter, new currencies, etc.) in ways that larger businesses cannot.

 

Networked Resilient Communities build local platforms that make it easier for everyone in the community to produce. From tool libraries to Saturday fix-it sessions to hackerspaces t0 co-working spaces to solar co-ops to community supported agriculture to garden allotments to community currencies. Platforms that make the common things needed for productive tasks easier and less expensive. Platforms that make community building and business formation easier.

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