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Arrival Cities
being an immigrant or living in a "slum" is a feature not a bug
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return to civilization - YouTube

The future design habitats of Villages within the City via @Ferananda (http://goo.gl/CSpZ9Q)

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Resilience Through Placemaking

Resilience Through Placemaking | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

A common thread found in Resilience theory is that of community strength. A community’s ability to survive and even thrive during tough times is largely decided both in the way that community builds itself around its physical places and also in the way people work and band together to create those spaces.

The art of place-making is arguably the best demonstration of community resilience at work. By definition placemaking involves the residents of a community – it’s not the product of an architect’s pen but rather the result of a community-designer-builder collaboration over time.

ddrrnt's insight:

"Placemaking co-evolves with imagination, inspiration, interaction, individual agency, inference, information, insights, interdependence, infrastructure and intangible assets." @JohnKellden - http://goo.gl/rzodgK

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6 Freeway Removals That Changed Their Cities Forever

6 Freeway Removals That Changed Their Cities Forever | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

"Many freeway systems were overbuilt in an auto-obsessed era, only to realize later that cities are actually healthier, greener, and safer without them. Like freeway cap parks, which hope to bridge the chasms through severed neighborhoods—Boston's Big Dig is a great example—freeway removal projects try to eradicate and undo the damage wrought from highways, while creating new, multifunctional shared streets that can be utilized by transit, bikes, walkers and yes, even cars.

 

"Okay, you're thinking, but where do all the cars go? It turns out that when you take out a high-occupancy freeway it doesn't turn the surface streets into the equivalent of the Autobahn. A theory called "induced demand" proves that if you make streets bigger, more people will use them. When you make them smaller, drivers discover and use other routes, and traffic turns out to be about the same. Don't believe it? Check out these freeway removals in cities all over the world and see for yourself."

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