Arrival Cities
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Arrival Cities
being an immigrant or living in a "slum" is a feature not a bug
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John Hagel: Move to the City, Learn Faster

In our 'flat' digital world, in which we can connect virtually with anybody we want, one could argue that the notion of an innovation hub is outdated. However, in today's lesson, innovation guru John Hagel explores the paradox that, despite the fact that technology infrastructure has made location unimportant, we're becoming more urbanized at a more rapid rate than ever before.

Why is this? According to Hagel, learning faster is becoming more and more important, and we simply learn faster in cities than we could on our own.

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Students’ Own Interests Will Drive the School Day of the Future

Students’ Own Interests Will Drive the School Day of the Future | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

The U.S. Department of Education has a clear vision of what the future school day should be.


There will continue to be traditional classrooms, teaching unified subject matter, but the vast majority of students will also participate in new kinds of classes where they are physically co-located with other students in a room, but the courses they are taking will be highly diverse from each other. (...)


Students will also partner with adult professionals in the sciences, commerce, academics and government to work on interesting and productive learning projects. I think we will see students making substantial, novel contributions to the public and commercial spheres through these activities, in the form of art, science, literature, journalism, software and beyond. (...)


I grew up in a Montessori school that my parents founded, and a lot of the techniques employed in that school focused on independent learning. The teachers there support students to move as quickly or slowly as they want, while ensuring that every student can develop a range of skills. This kind of individual support for students will be even more relevant and wide-spread in 2020.


January 24, 2011 | By Tina Barseghian

More on Education @ Arrival Cities



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To Raise A Generation Of Creative Kids, Let Them Make Their Own Stories

To Raise A Generation Of Creative Kids, Let Them Make Their Own Stories | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

For years, stories have been predominately linear push communications. Elite storytelling auteurs would weave their masterful tales. The great stories were devoured page-by-page, scene-by-scene by an engrossed, yet passive audience. However, kids growing up now will never know this purely passive form of content consumption.


Parents and the media industry need to stimulate a new form of storytelling. We need stories that invite participation, remixing, mashing-up, playing, and creating. These types of stories are a great way to help kids find and understand their place in the world. As kids play with their stories, the more they discover themselves. Through triggering key capabilities like role playing and imagination, kids can more clearly see their place in the society around them.


Via David Hodgson
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Warren Karlenzig: Collective Intelligence--Cities as Global Intelligence Platform

Social media and collaborative technologies--layered with smart systems combining geo-location data with human experience--will make cities the driving sustainability force in a dawning planetary era. Cities will anticipate new risks with rapid urban systems innovation based upon crowdsourcing, virtual and physical communities, and transparent markets sensitive to full carbon and resource costs. Creatively leveraging collective intelligence for clean energy, low carbon mobility and sustainable food and water, the new urban grid will enable high local quality of life, lifelong learning and vibrant green economies.


scoop'd from theurbn.com


“What is the one thing you can do to make a city more sustainable? That’s easy. Stop asking the question: What is the one thing you can do to make a city more sustainable?” How we should really be tackling the debate and issue is by first recognizing that cities are hyper-complex and none exactly alike. Meaning, every single one will have different solutions and every single one will need different solutions as it changes over time. Although these complexities and diversities sound like a strain on our ability to combat the problems faced, Warren Karlenzig argues that the dynamics and inter-connections of urban areas are what give them their “strength against shocks and stresses”. They are our gift and our curse.


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Sharing lessons on inclusive business - The Practitioner Hub - Business Fights Poverty

Sharing lessons on inclusive business - The Practitioner Hub - Business Fights Poverty | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

“Sharing knowledge is not about giving people something, or getting something from them. That is only valid for information sharing. Sharing knowledge occurs when people are genuinely interested in helping one another develop new capacities for action; it is about creating learning processes.”


Peter Senge, Center for Organizational Learning, MIT Sloan School of Management

 

Collaborating, innovating, asking hard questions and learning from others....are all vital ingredients for successful inclusive business. Every inclusive business project is unique but many of the opportunities, risks and challenges it faces are not. And every project, whether it succeeds or not, will provide a wealth of understanding that can be used to inform and improve future ventures.

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GOOD Ideas for Cities: Increasing Parental Involvement

GOOD Ideas for Cities: Increasing Parental Involvement | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Conversations around improving education largely focus on ideas for improving schools and teachers. But it has been proven that dedicated parental involvement is just as important for students. How could a city implement a stronger connection between parents and schools? As part of GOOD Ideas for Cities Cincinnati, the Cincinatives team tackled a challenge to increase parental interaction during one of the most important periods of a student's career—early childhood education. Their program, Home Room, focuses on showing parents that everyday, at-home experiences can turn into learning opportunities. A group of trusted community advocates across the city from churches and nonprofits would serve as advisors, holding workshops and serving as a resource for parents. Additionally, Home Room would create a series of learning tools, from apps to flashcards, which would help parents to add lessons to everyday activities.

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We are shaking the world with a new dream

We are shaking the world with a new dream | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

In Detroit, everything is in your face: (the following is taken from Margaret Wheatley’s invitation to the learning journey)


“Detroit is a place of stark and compelling contrasts and contradictions. Once the fourth largest city in America that glowed with the promise of industrialization, it is now an embodied prophecy of the post-industrial world, a world where:


  • citizens have been abandoned by their government and corporations
  • factories that employed tens of thousands of workers now lie in ruins
  • 1/3 of the land once filled with homes and neighborhoods is now grassy fields
  • public schools are shuttered and closed
  • drugs, high crime, and criminalization by the authorities plague youth and destroy their future


Like abandoned citizens everywhere, when people realize that no one is coming to help, the possibility of community arises. As people stop looking outside themselves and turn to one another, they discover the richness of resources to be found within themselves, their cultures and their land. Nowhere in the Western world is this discovery of community-as-resource more vibrant than in Detroit.”


recommended reading at

Brave New World - stories from the new paradigm

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DVICE: Ethiopian kids hack OLPCs in 5 months with zero instruction

DVICE: Ethiopian kids hack OLPCs in 5 months with zero instruction | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

What happens if you give a thousand Motorola Zoom tablet PCs to Ethiopian kids who have never even seen a printed word? Within five months, they'll start teaching themselves English while circumventing the security on your OS to customize settings and activate disabled hardware. Whoa.


Here's how it went down, as related by OLPC founder Nicholas Negroponte at MIT Technology Review's EmTech conference last week:


"We left the boxes in the village. Closed. Taped shut. No instruction, no human being. I thought, the kids will play with the boxes! Within four minutes, one kid not only opened the box, but found the on/off switch. He'd never seen an on/off switch. He powered it up. Within five days, they were using 47 apps per child per day. Within two weeks, they were singing ABC songs [in English] in the village. And within five months, they had hacked Android. Some idiot in our organization or in the Media Lab had disabled the camera! And they figured out it had a camera, and they hacked Android."

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Do Early Experiences in the Natural World Help Shape Children’s Brain Architecture?

Do Early Experiences in the Natural World Help Shape Children’s Brain Architecture? | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

A growing body of primarily correlative evidence suggests that, even in the densest urban neighborhoods, negative stress, obesity and other health problems are reduced and psychological and physical health improved when children and adults experience more nature in their everyday lives. These studies suggest that nearby nature can also stimulate learning abilities and reduce the symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and we know that therapies using gardening or animal companions do improve psychological health. We also know that parks with the richest biodiversity appear to have a positive impact on psychological well-being and social bonding among humans.


Via David Hodgson
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For Educators, the Importance of Making Meaningful Connections

For Educators, the Importance of Making Meaningful Connections | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
By Matt Levinson It's connected educator month.

 

There’s a flurry of activity among teachers and administrators looking to connect through Twitter and other social media to advance their learning, especially as a new school year looms.

As schools gear up and prepare for a new school year with technology increasingly ubiquitous, now’s the time to consider how schools can create a positive impact with technology.

 

Professor Alec Couros captures the essential element for schools to keep in mind as they move forward with technology initiatives. In an interview with Howard Rheingold for Digital Media and Learning, he comments on the need to focus on “what will endure,” the importance of connections and relationships to help foster, build and sustain the life of the “networked” teacher.

 

Read more at Mindshift.

 


Via Gust MEES
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Building Literacy / Touching Families

Building Literacy / Touching Families | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Understanding the learning potential of young children can change the world in dramatic ways. It can ensure peace or exacerbate war. That little brain is going to adapt whether it means pulling a trigger or planting a seed. Peace Corps and Rotary International are powerful organizations dedicated to a peaceful world. One of the avenues to that end is literacy. If children are able to read, they will be more informed and can make decisions for themselves. People who can read are more able to take charge of their lives and are less likely to be victimized.

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Turtles ● Seeds ● Hands Learning

Turtles ● Seeds ● Hands Learning | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Following the moment leads to so much learning. Having no plan is sometimes the best plan. After all, learning is available everywhere. The turtle was rescued, found with a broken shell, adopted by the ever-caring hands of a young child. It has been shared, housed, fed, and clearly loved.  


Turtle research followed, along with a Spanish lesson focusing on a turtle. Whatever scheduled lesson comes with you in the morning, it is best to slide it in the back pocket when learning shows up in the faces of your children. Leaning is natural, school is not. We must be intuitive enough to know the difference.

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