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being an immigrant or living in a "slum" is a feature not a bug
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Parks Are Part of Our Healthcare System

Parks Are Part of Our Healthcare System | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

“Parks are a part of our healthcare system,” said Dr. Daphne Miller, a professor of family and community medicine, University of California, San Francisco, at the Greater & Greener: Reimagining Parks for 21st Century Cities, a conference in New York City. She said these green spaces are crucial to solving hypertension, anxiety, depression, diabetes — “the diseases of indoor living.” The more someone spends outdoors, the less likely they are to suffer from mental or physical disorders. But she said parks officials and the medical profession still needs more data to take aim at the many “naysayers on the other side” who don’t believe in what every landscape architect values.


Via nancercize, Kirk Fontaine
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Kirk Fontaine's comment, August 25, 2012 10:08 PM
thanks nancericize More attention and funds should be focused on the outdoor resources that are healthy as well cheap - it is a no-brainer
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Texas’ Perry rejects Medicaid expansion. What now?

Texas’ Perry rejects Medicaid expansion. What now? | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

"What!??" - via @toughLoveforx


Gov. Rick Perry’s declaration Monday that Texas should decline to expand Medicaid and leave creation of a health insurance exchange to the federal government could create burdens for the uninsured, local taxpayers and federal officials seeking to implement the federal health law.


The provision that Perry wants the state to reject would add to the state’s Medicaid rolls more than 1.5 million poor, childless adults who are currently ineligible, plus as many as 300,000 pregnant women, children and extremely poor parents who already qualify but aren’t enrolled.


The coverage would begin in 2014. In the first five years, the state’s costs for the expansion would be $5.8 billion, and Texas would receive $76.3 billion in federal matching funds. Despite that prospective gain, Perry said it would be unwise to enlarge “a broken system that is already financially unsustainable.”


Texas state Rep. Garnet Coleman, a Houston Democrat who is a leading health policy writer, said Perry “chose the policy that’s best for him politically” but ignored the plight of poor adults, many suffering from diabetes, cancer and mental illness.


“The governor said it’s better to follow his ideology and throw those folks under the bus than to provide health coverage that the state of Texas would pay zero for, at least for the first three years,” Coleman said.

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Republican Governor of Florida Says State Won’t Expand Medicaid

Republican Governor of Florida Says State Won’t Expand Medicaid | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

@toughLoveforx asks, "What?!"


Gov. Rick Scott of Florida, a Republican, said Monday that his state would not expand its Medicaid program.


The governor acknowledged that for three years, from 2014 to 2016, the federal government would pay all the costs of covering people newly eligible for Medicaid.


Republicans in Congress are encouraging continued state opposition to the federal law, which was upheld last week by the Supreme Court.


A Texas official welcomed the Supreme Court decision, saying it provided an opportunity for states to “push back against” the expansion of Medicaid.


More than one-fifth of Florida residents — roughly 4 million of 19 million people — lack health insurance.

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States Face a Challenge to Meet Health Law’s Deadline

The Supreme Court’s decision to uphold the Affordable Care Act shifts the focus from whether sweeping changes to the health insurance market should take place to a scramble to meet the law’s rapidly approaching deadlines.


A number of largely Republican-led states that gambled on delay now face the unsettling prospect that the federal government could take over their responsibilities, particularly in setting up the health insurance marketplaces known as exchanges, where people will be able to choose among policies for their coverage.


Under the law, which the court upheld in its entirety by a 5-to-4 vote, individuals must be able to buy insurance coverage through the new state exchanges by Jan. 1, 2014.


The government projects that about 32 million people will gain insurance by 2019, with 24 million obtaining coverage through the exchanges and about 16 million newly qualifying for Medicaid, the government insurance program for the poorest Americans.

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Obesity is a very serious medical condition...

Obesity is a very serious medical condition, no longer viewed as strictly an issue of cosmetics. It’s a contributing factor in the death and disability of too many of our neighbors, friends and family members, and its societal costs are astronomical. Although overall obesity prevalence rates appear to be leveling off, there are still far too many Americans who are overweight or obese – approximately one-third of adults are obese and another third are overweight.


Besides facing an increased risk of premature death, people who are obese are at greater risk of serious medical conditions that can make them very sick, potentially subjecting them to constant pain and suffering and diminished quality of life. Obesity not only drives up health care costs for patients and families, it costs businesses – and the country – tens of billions of dollars in lost productivity and higher employee health costs.

 

http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/weight-nation-challenges/

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Fifteen governors reject or leaning against expanded Medicaid program

@toughLoveforx asks, "What?!"


Seven states with Republican governors have given a flat “no” to the Medicaid expansion since the Supreme Court ruling, according to reports and press statements (see list at here).


Past estimates have found that, as designed, the law’s expansion would have provided healthcare access to an additional 17 million low-income Americans.


Alan Weil with the National Academy for State Health Policy said states that do not comply could raise the ire of some in Congress.


“If states turn down that offer, it leaves a lot of people uninsured. If we end up in that place, a lot of people in Congress are going to say that is a problem,” he said.



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Infographic of the Day: How Bad Is U.S. Health Care?

Infographic of the Day: How Bad Is U.S. Health Care? | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

A bracing graphic summarizing the many failings of the U.S. health-care system.


The graphic by the The National Geographic summarizes the three facets of the problem: Cost, results, and access.

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Mariana Soffer's comment, July 4, 2012 9:48 PM
really bad dan, we have to take care of ourselves