Arrival Cities
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being an immigrant or living in a "slum" is a feature not a bug
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The Singapore Vertical-Farms that herald an Agricultural Revolution

In Singapore, the challenge of feeding a growing population is pushing the concept of urban farming to new heights. A super-efficient vertical farming system is producing greens for 5 million residents.

"Can we supply enough food for everyone on the planet?" is a question plaguing leaders around the world. In Singapore SkyGreen offers one example of how this might be possible, "not just technically, but economically". By increasing their food security while reducing the impact of food production on global climate change, SkyGreen is 10 times more productive per square foot than conventional farming.

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How to feed the world in 2050: actions in a changing climate

World Scientists Urge Key Actions for Achieving Food Security in a Changing Climate http://ccafs.cgiar.org/commission/reports/ To achieve food security in a ...

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Land concentration, land grabbing and peopleʼs struggles in Europe

Land concentration, land grabbing and peopleʼs struggles in Europe | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Until now the global phenomenon that is widely referred to as ?land grabbing' has been generally assumed to be happening only in the Global South, and with many reports claiming that it is concentrated in Africa and that the main land grabbers are Chinese, Indian and South Korean companies as well as the Gulf States. Transnational social movement and NGO campaigns have likewise tended to accept unquestioningly this general assumption that land grabbing is a phenomenon focused on countries in the South, especially African countries. By bringing Europe's land issues into focus, the present study stands to change the way we think of contemporary land grabbing in at least three fundamental ways.

 

First, land grabbing is not the only important and pressing land issue in the world today; the ongoing trend of 'generic' land concentration is just as significant and problematic. Second, land concentration and land grabbing do not only occur in developing countries in the South, but are trends that are currently underway in Europe as well. Third, the study shows that people's struggles against land concentration and land grabbing are also unfolding in Europe, suggesting that a truly transnational perspective on political struggle against contemporary enclosures is certainly warranted, if not urgently needed. 

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Eating the Landscape: American Indian Stories of Food, Identity, and Resilience

Eating the Landscape: American Indian Stories of Food, Identity, and Resilience | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

“Eating is not only a political act, it is also a cultural act that reaffirms one’s identity and worldview,” Enrique Salmón writes in Eating the Landscape. Traversing a range of cultures, including the Tohono O’odham of the Sonoran Desert and the Rarámuri of the Sierra Tarahumara, the book is an illuminating journey through the southwest United States and northern Mexico. Salmón weaves his historical and cultural knowledge as a renowned Indigenous ethnobotanist with stories American Indian farmers have shared with him to illustrate how traditional Indigenous foodways—from the cultivation of crops to the preparation of meals—are rooted in a time-honored understanding of environmental stewardship.

 

In this fascinating personal narrative, Salmón focuses on an array of Indigenous farmers who uphold traditional agricultural practices in the face of modern changes to food systems such as extensive industrialization and the genetic modification of food crops. Despite the vast cultural and geographic diversity of the region he explores, Salmón reveals common themes: the importance of participation in a reciprocal relationship with the land, the connection between each group’s cultural identity and their ecosystems, and the indispensible correlation of land consciousness and food consciousness. Salmón shows that these collective philosophies provide the foundation for indigenous resilience as the farmers contend with global climate change and other disruptions to long-established foodways. This resilience, along with the rich stores of traditional ecological knowledge maintained by indigenous agriculturalists, Salmón explains, may be the key to sustaining food sources for humans in years to come.

Traversing a range of cultures, including the Tohono O'odham of the Sonoran Desert and the Rarámuri of the Sierra Tarahumara ByEnrique Salmón University of Arizona Press 2012 Excerpt: In My Grandm...

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Cultivating a Better Food Production System

Cultivating a Better Food Production System | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
Written by the founders of Food Tank; 13 resolutions for changing the food production system.

 

Growing in Cities:  Food production doesn’t only happen in fields or factories. Nearly one billion people worldwide produce food in cities. In Kibera, the largest slum in Africa, farmers are growing seeds of indigenous vegetables and selling them to rural farmers. At Bell Book & Candle restaurant in New York, customers are served rosemary, cherry tomatoes, romaine, and other produce grown from the restaurant’s aeroponic rooftop garden.
 
Creating Better Access:  People’s Grocery in Oakland and Fresh Moves in Chicago bring mobile grocery stores to food deserts giving low-income consumers opportunities to make healthy food choices. Instead of chips and soda, they provide customers with affordable organic produce, not typically available in their communities.

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Jared Broker's comment, June 14, 2013 9:57 PM
Local and urban gardening is the future of food. The horrifying studies of GMO food are fueling it. About time!
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4 Tips For Starting A Farm In Your City

4 Tips For Starting A Farm In Your City | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

A recently released video by the American Society of Landscape Architects uses case studies from edible-city innovators, such as Cleveland and Detroit, to offer practical advice for bringing urban farms to your backyard (or corner lot or rooftop). Here are four helpful tips:


  • Plant a garden in your own yard (or farm the job out to someone else).
  • Populate empty lots with crops.
  • Use your roof.

  • Fill up your food trucks.


Jude Stewart

07 May 2012

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Seattle builds nation’s largest food forest | SmartPlanet

Seattle builds nation’s largest food forest | SmartPlanet | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

In Seattle’s Beacon Hill neighborhood, plans are in place to turn an empty seven acre lot that didn’t receive much attention (expect from the occasional lawn mower) into a “food forest” for everyone to use. And when it’s complete, the Beacon Food Forest will be the largest public food forest in the United States, according to the Seattle news website Crosscut. It will look something like this:

[A]n entire acre will feature large chestnuts and walnuts in the overstory, full-sized fruit trees like big apples and mulberries in the understory, and berry shrubs, climbing vines, herbaceous plants, and vegetables closer to the ground.

Further down the path an edible arboretum full of exotic looking persimmons, mulberries, Asian pears, and Chinese haws will surround a sheltered classroom for community workshops. Looking over the whole seven acres, you’ll see playgrounds and kid space full of thornless mini edibles adjacent to community gardening plots, native plant areas, a big timber-frame gazebo and gathering space with people barbecuing, a recreational field, and food as far as you can see.

[...]

In a food forest, everything from the tree canopy to the roots is edible or useful in some way.

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Vancouver Hungry for New Food Strategy

Yolande Cole discusses some of the elements being considered for Vancouver's new city-wide food strategy, which "will include over 60 actions intended to expand [the city's] food system."


Mini farmers markets in lower-income areas, community gardens on rooftops, mobile green grocers - these are just some of the strategies being considered for inclusion in Vancouver's new long-range food strategy, which is scheduled to go to city council in late January 2013. In addition to outlining ways to boost the city's food production, the plan will focus on improving access to healthy food. According to the City of Vancouver’s director of social policy, Mary Clare Zak, "[p]otential actions could include enacting licensing changes to allow more 'community markets' with fresh produce to be set up at low-income sites such as social housing, as well as setting up mobile green grocers, encouraging healthy corner stores, and procuring more nutritious food in bulk for charitable providers in the Downtown Eastside."


"Expanding urban-farming initiatives, in addition to community gardens, is another central focus of the city’s food strategy," says Cole. "Vancouver currently has 19 urban farms, according to Zak, but aims to see that number grow to 35 by the year 2020, through measures such as the creation of an urban-farming business-licence category."


via  Planetizen

26 Nov 2012

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Eating Our Cities: Dissecting the Urban Food Dilemma | Sustainable Cities Collective

Eating Our Cities: Dissecting the Urban Food Dilemma | Sustainable Cities Collective | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

What role does urban agriculture play in sustaining our cities?


Urban agriculture is the latest iteration in our society’s attempts to deal with the dilemma of feeding our cities.Yet like energy, the cheapest and most environmentally friendly food we can source is the food we waste. I’m not for a minute suggesting you send your little ones out the hang out at the dumpster behind the supermarket, but rather think about the total cost of our food habits. What does it ‘cost’ to buy that bulk pack of flour at the mega mart only to have the weevils dine on half the bag that you never got around to turning into home baked bread? This might sound glib- but from an ecological footprint calculation the single biggest contribution to Canberra’s hectare equivalent of resources used to run this city is food. Canberra’s ecological footprint was 8.5 global hectares (gha) per person or 2.65 million gha – roughly 11 times the actual land the Australian Capital Territory occupies.

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Smart Tech For Scaled-Up Urban Agriculture | Earthtechling

Smart Tech For Scaled-Up Urban Agriculture | Earthtechling | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

High-yield greenhouse tech developed by the Swedish government has found a home in Plantagon's large-scale, vertical greenhouses designed for cities.


It has been estimated that by 2050, as much as 80 percent of the earth’s population will reside in cities. Considering that, by conservative estimates, the total population will total 2 billion, this question is, how are we going to feed our cities in an ecologically friendly way?  (...)


When plants reach the bottom of the greenhouse, they are harvested via a harvesting machine. After the harvest, the trays and pots are disinfected, and the pots are separated and replanted with another seed for the next round in the cultivation loop. (...)


The idea is that such large-scale greenhouses can work symbiotically with the built environment of the city, including its industrial buildings. Greenhouses can make use of the surplus heat produced by such buildings to become more energy efficient, suck up carbon dioxide from the air, and make use of food waste for fertilizer. (...)



via | Earthtechling

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Street Food Is Not A Crime | Laws That Shaped LA

Street Food Is Not A Crime  | Laws That Shaped LA | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

...most of the street food sold in Los Angeles is done so in violation of the law.


"It's illegal in two forms," Mark Vallianatos says of many of the items sold from carts, grills and stands. Food trucks operate under different regulations which will be addressed in a future Laws That Shaped L.A. column.


Vallianatos is an author, Occidental College adjunct professor and policy director at Oxy's Urban & Environmental Policy Institute (UEPI). He's nominated the Retail Food Code as a Law That Shaped L.A.
'
"It's illegal under the California Retail Food Code. And also in Los Angeles, it's illegal to sell food on the sidewalk," Vallianatos says, citing Los Angeles Municipal Code Section 42(b).


"But," he continues, "[selling street food is] also ubiquitous, helps define the city and is really an essential part of Los Angeles culture and the food scene in local neighborhoods." (...)


"The issue," Vallianatos says, "is making sure there's a balance between enforcement and creating a good system for vendors so they feel like they have a legitimate reason to become legal and can actually sell and make money and operate and [dealing] with these health code issues so making sure that no one can do it without a $200,000 food truck."




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40% of U.S. food wasted, report says

40% of U.S. food wasted, report says | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

40% of U.S. food wasted, report says.
Forty percent of food in the United States is never eaten, amounting to $165 billion a year in waste, taking a toll on the country' s water resources and significantly increasing greenhouse gas emissions, according to a report from the Natural Resources Defense Council released this week.


The group says more than 20 pounds of food is wasted each month for each of 311 million Americans, amounting to $1,350 to $2,275 annually in waste for a family of four. Think of it as dumping 80 quarter-pound hamburger patties in the garbage each month, or chucking two dozen boxes of breakfast cereal into the trash bin rather than putting them in your pantry.

The report points out waste in all areas of the U.S. food supply chain, from field to plate, from farms to warehouses, from buffets to school cafeterias.


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Can Urban Agriculture Feed a Hungry World?

Can Urban Agriculture Feed a Hungry World? | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Agricultural researchers believe that building indoor farms in the middle of cities could help solve the world’s hunger problem. Experts say that vertical farming could feed up to 10 billion people and make agriculture independent of the weather and the need for land. There’s only one snag: The urban farms need huge amounts of energy

 

— City Farmer News

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This Futuristic Indoor Garden Is Also A Groovy Fish Tank

This Futuristic Indoor Garden Is Also A Groovy Fish Tank | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
Attention city-dwellers: Grow your own herbs vegetables and flowers with this novel aquaponic gardening system.

 

The Aqualibrium Garden is a series of stackable chambers that functions as both garden and aquarium. Once the crates snap together, they create an aquaponic system for growing edibles at home. Aquaponics is a symbiotic system where water circulates from the fish tank below and up into the soil of the garden. The fish, snails, or crawfish supply nutrients (read: poop) that fertilize the soil and aid in plant growth. The plants, which are warmed by a built-in LED grow light, subsequently filter the water, returning fresh H2O back to the fish tank. (And if the idea of keeping both fish and plants alive seems daunting, there is a hydroponic option allowing gardeners to simply add nutrients to the water.)

 

“People in urban environments typically don’t have the necessary environment for growing their own food,” says Joshua Rittenberg, CEO of Aqualibrium. “Right now, there is no product on the market that allows for substantial food production using either aquaponics or hydroponics that is designed for urban living and is cost-effective.”

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Ecopolis: The emergence of 'regenerative cities'

Ecopolis: The emergence of 'regenerative cities' | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Professor Herbert Girardet has spent much of his working life on this issue and has come up with the concept of ‘regenerative cities' that aims to set out a roadmap of transformation in the way cities function - and also offers hope that humanity's fate need not be one of resource wars, conflict and climate chaos.

 

Girardet gradually came to realise that the concept of ‘sustainability' is no longer fit for purpose;

 

"Today there is much less to sustain than when the term was coined in the 1980s. We've exceeded the limits to growth on nearly every aspect of development. Sustainable development will not dig us out of the hole we find ourselves in. We have to start thinking in terms of regenerative development. This means working towards giving back to nature as much we take.

 

So, what is a regenerative city - ‘Ecopolis'? It is one that relies primarily on local and regional food supplies; it is powered, heated, cooled and driven by renewable energy, and it reuses resources and restores degraded ecosystems. This is diametrically opposed to how many cities are currently run: they use resources without concern for their origins or destination of their waste products; they emit vast amounts of carbon dioxide without ensuring reabsorption and they consume huge amounts of meat produced mainly with imported feed, often from devastated rainforest regions.


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Cooperatives as Business Models of the Future

Cooperatives as Business Models of the Future | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Cooperatives as Business Models of the Future - When the International Year of Cooperatives (IYC) concluded last week, some of the overwhelming success stories highlighted at a two-day interactive session came both from developing and developed countries,...

Dame Pauline Green, president of the International Cooperative Alliance...

In Brazil, Green said, a clearly defined government policy aimed at helping rural people, through cooperative businesses, has seen a massive reduction in poverty in the rural areas of the sprawling South American nation.

In Kenya, cooperatives account for nearly half of the country’s gross domestic product (GDP), while in Rwanda the cooperative economy has gone from zero to eight percent of GDP over the last 10 years.

The world’s largest 300 cooperatives, primarily in the insurance and food and agriculture sectors, generated revenues of 1.6 trillion dollars and employed nearly 100 million people worldwide.

 

Asked if the cooperative model of enterprise may well be one of the answers to the global economic crisis, Green told IPS, “Without doubt the cooperative business model offers a proven solution to this global economic crisis we are mired in.”

In the UK, she said, schools have become one of the fastest-growing parts of the cooperative economy.


“Renewable energy cooperatives have been springing up all over the globe, and of course media is another area which benefits from the cooperative model because it ensures independent journalism remains viable,” she noted.

 

ddrrnt's insight:

https://twitter.com/toughLoveforx/status/356034145530556418

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Ron Finley: A guerilla gardener in South Central LA

Ron Finley plants vegetable gardens in South Central LA -- in abandoned lots, traffic medians, along the curbs. Why? For fun, for defiance, for beauty and to offer some alternative to fast food in a community where "the drive-thrus are killing more people than the drive-bys."

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FOOD FIGHT - Earth Amplified feat. Stic.Man of Dead Prez

‎"We feel the greatest hope for fundamental change starts with the foundation for the future -- our youth -- so the Food Fight team combined music and film with a school curriculum, to help teachers engage students on the most pressing issues we face, in a unique way.

The flaws of our global economy are best exposed by looking at our food system -- soil-depleting and oil-depleting factory farming, economic policies that contribute to starvation abroad, and disease and obesity at home, all packaged with a marketing campaign to enforce the "buy first, ask never" social contract -- just buy what they say to buy, and eat/shut up.

 

If we care about our kids, ourselves, and our planet, it's time to expose the truth on a broader scale, and hope enough Food Fighters step up to make the changes we need."

 

SHARE IT? Accompanying FREE CURRICULUM, LYRICS & SONG DOWNLOAD at http://SosJuice.com/foodfight ;

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Crowdfunding for 100 Urban Gardens Across America

Crowdfunding for 100 Urban Gardens Across America | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Whole Kids Foundation, PACT and Indiegogo have joined forces to create an inspiring crowdfunding initiative: building 100 urban gardens across the United States. This is the first time a non-profit, a brand and a global crowdfunding platform have partnered to help drive change in local communities around the country.


Whole Foods' non-profit arm will facilitate each grant and provide online resources, while PACT, an organic apparel company supporting global causes, will provide physical perks in exchange for donations. Indiegogo will provide the platform through which donations can be made until Feb. 28.

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Feed Your City: How Architecture and Farming Work Together

Feed Your City: How Architecture and Farming Work Together | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

It’s easy to argue that architecture plays a part in the world of food; most restaurants are uniquely designed to better the dining experience after all. However, the architect’s ties to the industry go much deeper, and designers are beginning to revolutionize the way we see & manage food production.


As these cities grow, it is important that we continue to find new and innovative ways to provide for the populace. Vertical farming and urban agriculture offer relief in metropolitan environments, helping to reduce the pressure of public food supply while also changing our traditional approach to food production.


See 11 great examples at the article link...


Via Lauren Moss
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UN to send emergency aid to Cuba

UN to send emergency aid to Cuba | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

The UN's World Food Programme is to send emergency food supplies to Cuba and also appeals for funds to help Haiti in the wake of Hurricane Sandy.


It was "the worst catastrophe in 50 years in Santiago de Cuba," WFP spokeswoman Elisabeth Byrs said.


The WFP is also appealing for $20m (£12.5) to help some 425,000 Haitians affected by the storm.


Sandy caused widespread damage to infrastructure, crops and livestock in both Haiti and Cuba.  (...)


Cuban President Raul Castro is in Santiago to oversee recovery efforts and has promised to remain until the power is back on.


In the city, much of the debris has been cleared from the streets and pupils have returned to classes, although not all are being held in actual school buildings.


According to initial government reports, Sandy damaged some 200,000 homes and affected more than a million people.


"We are especially concerned about the damage in the agricultural sector where tens of thousands of hectares of staple crops have been affected," said WFP emergency co-ordinator William Vigil in a statement.


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Farming the Urban Sea

Farming the Urban Sea | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Aquaculture has rightly earned a reputation for growing low-quality seafood at the expense of the environment, but a new form of ocean-friendly farming has emerged right outside of New York City. These small-scale vertical farms -- some of the first in the country -- are designed to grow multiple species of seaweed and shellfish, have small footprints, and provide an array of environmental benefits. Picture them as three-dimensional gardens, where seaweed, mussels, and scallops grow at the top of the water column, stacked above oysters and clams below.

 


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Researchers Present Study on How Global Climate Change Affects Violence

If global warming is a scientific fact, then you better be prepared for the earth to become a more violent place. That's because new Iowa State University research shows that as the earth's average


... temperature rises, so too does human "heat" in the form of violent tendencies.


"It is very well researched and what I call the 'heat hypothesis,'" Anderson said. "When people get hot, they behave more aggressively.


... the researchers estimate that if the annual average temperature in the U.S. increases by 8°F (4.4°C), the yearly murder and assault rate will increase by 34 per 100,000 people -- or 100,000 more per year in a population of 305 million.


... global temperatures also increases known risk factors for the development of aggression in violence-prone individuals

rapid climate change can lead to changes in the availability of food, water, shelter...


... such shortages can also lead to civil war and unrest, migration to adjacent regions and conflict with people who already live in that region ... 

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Mark Winne on Changing Our Food and Changing Ourselves

Mark Winne has worked for 40 years as a community food activist, writer, and trainer. From organizing breakfast programs for low-income children in Maine to developing innovative national food policies in Washington, DC, Winne has dedicated his professional life and writing to enabling people to find solutions to their own food problems as well as those that face their communities and the world.


Of his first book, Closing the Food Gap, Dr. Jane Goodall said, “It is heartening to find a book that successfully blends a passion for sustainable living with compassion for the poor.”

 

Food Rebels, Guerrilla Gardeners, and Smart-Cookin’ Mamas challenges us to go beyond eating local food to become part of a larger solution that demands a system that sustains not just our bodies, but also our souls.

 

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These Tomatoes Are Helping to Improve the Environment

These Tomatoes Are Helping to Improve the Environment | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

California tomato grower Casey Houweling is the first American to install a combined heat and power generation plant that will make his 150-acre greenhouse almost completely energy-efficient. The plant will use natural gas to keep the greenhouse warm, and the extra electricity it generates will be sold into the local power grid. Most notably, it will feed carbon dioxide gas, a waste product, directly into the greenhouse. The use of this gas helps increase plant growth and improve the tomatoes' flavor.

 

via IdeaFeed | Big Think

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