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being an immigrant or living in a "slum" is a feature not a bug
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Forget New York City, This City is Where All the Artists Are Moving To

Forget New York City, This City is Where All the Artists Are Moving To | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Lisbon, Portugal: The city investing in art in the middle of a financial crisis.

. . . 

This creative renaissance, it turns out, is not spontaneous, but rather the product of opportunistic public policy. In times of crisis, most governments take the knife to spending aimed at promoting art, design or publishing. But continental Europe’s westernmost capital decided instead to concentrate scarce resources on its “creative economy.”

. . .

And Lisbon’s has perks that established creative hubs just can’t touch. Unlike Barcelona, tourists haven’t completely overrun it. The cost of living is laughably cheap compared to London: $1800 for a small apartment and a $5 for beer, while in Lisbon it’s $470 and $1.50 respectively. And Berlin’s dreary skies can’t begin to compete with Lisbon’s 200 days of sunshine every year.

 

 

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Wow. I'm especially keen to check out Lisbon soon.

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Cooperatives as Business Models of the Future

Cooperatives as Business Models of the Future | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Cooperatives as Business Models of the Future - When the International Year of Cooperatives (IYC) concluded last week, some of the overwhelming success stories highlighted at a two-day interactive session came both from developing and developed countries,...

Dame Pauline Green, president of the International Cooperative Alliance...

In Brazil, Green said, a clearly defined government policy aimed at helping rural people, through cooperative businesses, has seen a massive reduction in poverty in the rural areas of the sprawling South American nation.

In Kenya, cooperatives account for nearly half of the country’s gross domestic product (GDP), while in Rwanda the cooperative economy has gone from zero to eight percent of GDP over the last 10 years.

The world’s largest 300 cooperatives, primarily in the insurance and food and agriculture sectors, generated revenues of 1.6 trillion dollars and employed nearly 100 million people worldwide.

 

Asked if the cooperative model of enterprise may well be one of the answers to the global economic crisis, Green told IPS, “Without doubt the cooperative business model offers a proven solution to this global economic crisis we are mired in.”

In the UK, she said, schools have become one of the fastest-growing parts of the cooperative economy.


“Renewable energy cooperatives have been springing up all over the globe, and of course media is another area which benefits from the cooperative model because it ensures independent journalism remains viable,” she noted.

 

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Recognizing Opportunity in the Growing Force of Migration

Recognizing Opportunity in the Growing Force of Migration | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Today is International Migrants Day, a day proclaimed by the United Nations in 2000 as a day to share information and further action to protect the rights of migrant workers. Migrant labor is increasing and creating growing economic and social connections across borders—within regions and across the globe, as markets shift. One of the strongest economic ties between families are remittances, which are expected to reach a record of $534 billion in money sent back home throughout the world in 2012, according to a report by the World Bank. This is a drastic increase since 2000 when remittances were at an estimated $132 billion.


Migrant labor also contributes to growth and productivity in a host country. In the U.S., foreign-born workers make up an increasing portion of the labor force. Migration is both a human rights and an economic issue, and often far from a voluntary phenomenon. Economic and environmental factors and conflict force many people to migrate in search of stability and income opportunities. In North America, difficult economic circumstances at home force many Central Americans and Mexicans to migrate to Canada and the U.S., countries which offer better opportunities for labor. Immigration policies, however, often condemn migrants to illegal status, creating an imbalance that further complicates economic and social challenges.


Ashoka - Innovators for the Public

18 Dec 2012

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Startup Spotlight: How to fund civic projects without the government

Startup Spotlight: How to fund civic projects without the government | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Jase Wilson is the founder of Neighbor.ly, a crowd funding platform for civic projects. Organizations can post projects on the site and raise money from the community. Neighbor.ly grew out of Wilson’s frustration at community meetings. A self-identified “city geek,” he has two degrees in urban planning and design. Time and time again, Wilson heard great ideas and proposals, but the common denominator was a lack of resources to make them happen. He decided to create an alternative channel for municipal fundraising.


“Cities are broke,” Wilson said. “People need civic projects- the economy, jobs, and quality of life all benefit when good civic projects happen. It’s a problem that needs innovation now. We built Neighbor.ly to help greenlight civic projects, even when the community budget is not so awesome.” (...)


Grassroots movements are picking up around the country and Wilson and his small team are picking up where Kickstarter leaves off by focusing on civic initiatives. In addition to a financial platform, they also provide their expertise and knowledge surrounding urban planning. Wilson said depending on how things progress with the economy, this type of model would be a useful alternative for keeping certain government services alive. Only time will tell.


Rebecca Grant

26 Oct 2012

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Shareable: The Launch of A Community Sharing Hub

Shareable: The Launch of A Community Sharing Hub | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

With all the justified excitement forming around the burgeoning sharing economy, we sometimes overlook the fact that sharing is indeed a very old tradition. Though use of the internet and social media has certainly popularized this old custom – and even given it a well-deserved second wind – the key to the sharing economy’s survival still rests on its potential to generate a true sense of community. In order to continue its amazing trajectory and stand the test of time, perhaps it still needs to hold fast to its roots, its sense of place, its solid foundation in real life communities. Luckily for the sharing economy, even good old-fashioned community organizations are starting to catch on.


Read more about the "Community Sharing Hub" from Phinney Neighborhood Association (PNA).

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A real class war may be on its way.

A real class war may be on its way. | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Hard times can create mean times. Americans may find scapegoats for stagnation, as many already have in immigrants or public-sector unions. But permanent stagnation could also lead to the creation of class politics, which by the standards of other nations have been largely absent from the American experience — save among the rich. Since growth slowed in the ’70s, the wealthy have sought and won changes to tax codes, financial regulations, campaign spending laws and the bargaining power of workers that have enabled them to claim an unprecedented share of the country’s output.


Long-term stagnation, however, might just transform this one-sided class war into a two-sided contest. If growth vanishes — or if the wealthy continue to claim so vast a share of our wealth that growth vanishes for everyone but them — then the only path that the 99 percent could take to better their lot would be explicitly redistributive.


Via David Hodgson
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Detroit’s Principles for a Prosperous City

Detroit’s Principles for a Prosperous City | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
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What GNH (Gross National Happiness) measures

Gross National Happiness #GNHin  Butan measures: compassion,social sustainable development, fairness of distribution, environmental conservation.

 

They want to be 100% organic & biodynamic. They pledge to be carbon neutral. They also measure material and inmaterial dimension of education and are moving from a monarchy to a democracy. All the hierarchy reports from the point of view of GNH.

 

GNH is Not hippie happiness but: a transformative approach, a non-dual perspective (understading of the oneness of people and land) and a systemic approach (considering all levels of the system). Bottom up and top down. They are also creating a Center to apply GNH.

 

Tho Ha Vinh and Julia Kim on Gross National Happiness (GNH) in Bhutan, at the Presencing Global Forum 2012 in Berlin...


Via Ferananda, ddrrnt
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‘Cropswap’ website takes barter between home gardeners online

‘Cropswap’ website takes barter between home gardeners online | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

What do you do when you’ve got a bumper crop of zucchini or lettuce? Or flower bulbs that have multiplied like rabbits? Many people give their extras away. And in the down economy, more and more hobby gardeners are trading their bounty at swap meets.


In this deal, no cash is exchanged – just the eggs and plants these two urbanites produced at their homes in Kent and Seattle.


Sparky Glass says in the past, he’s sold his eggs to friends and used the income to help pay for the upkeep of his chickens.


But this season, he’s also accepted lemon cucumbers from a lady in Tacoma for his eggs. All this thanks to the Cropswap website.


He says once he found the Cropswap website on the Internet, he got hooked right away....


via — City Farmer News


Via Elle D'Coda
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What the Economic Crisis Really Means - and what we can do about it

Doing It Ourselves aims to broaden understanding of the debt crisis and peak resources and encourage action for the sake of personal preparedness, happiness and ethical living. This animation sums up the key challenges facing our global society of credit crisis and resource scarcity and describes a path we can take to a happier life, now and in the future! Find out more at http://www.doingitourselves.org

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Economic Democracy - The Bronx Cooperative Development Initiative

Economic Democracy - The Bronx Cooperative Development Initiative | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Supported by the MIT CoLab - The Bronx Cooperative Development Initiative (BCDI) is an effort to harness local assets and drive a comprehensive regional economic development strategy that is focused on building wealth, ownership, and business leadership among low and moderate-income residents of the Bronx while fostering an environmentally just and sustainable regional economy.


The aim of the BCDI is to pursue a comprehensive development model, focusing on building wealth broadly, increasing the influence local residents and leaders have in the economy, and building the institutional relationships in the Bronx necessary to bring this bottom up approach of economic development to scale.


Via David Hodgson
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Re-thinking Progress: The Circular Economy

There's a world of opportunity to re-think and re-design the way we make stuff.


Ellen MacArthur on sustainable economy.

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Ellen MacArthur on sustainable economy

Ellen MacArthur on sustainable economy | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Record-breaking solo yachtswoman Dame Ellen MacArthur is in Davos to promote a new approach towards a sustainable economy.

 

She wants products to be made that they are easy to disassemble in order to re-cycle the parts inside.

 

She claims that the approach, called a circular economy, could mean savings of $630bn for Europe alone.


[video] Re-thinking Progress: The Circular Economy 

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Shareable: Region in Italy Reaches 30% Coop Economy

Shareable: Region in Italy Reaches 30% Coop Economy | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

The Emilia-Romagna region in Northern Italy is one of the richest in Europe, known for its high-end car manufacturing. While Emilia-Romagna is one of the most economically successful regions in Europe, it is also one of the most cooperative regions in the world. Nearly two of every three of its 4.5 million citizens are members of a cooperative. Cooperatives support around 30% of the region’s GDP, making it a stellar example of a large-scale cooperative economy. As with Mondragon Cooperative Corporation in Spain, the cooperative economy is strongly bolstered by networked relationships which also make cooperatives more resilient in economic crises. Learn more by watching the prezi below.

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Walkable Urbanism as Foreign Policy

Walkable Urbanism as Foreign Policy | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Earlier this month, national security scholar Patrick Doherty published a proposal in Foreign Policy magazine for America’s next “grand strategy,” a plan for how the U.S. should reposition itself in a world defined less by threats from communism or terrorism and more by the global challenge of sustainability. His offering is among a crop of such foreign policy tracts all aiming big ideas at the newly re-inaugurated president.


These treatises usually have little to do with the more prosaic problems of cities, with housing or transportation or unemployment. But part of Doherty’s particular argument snagged our attention: He believes a central piece of American security and strength in the 21st century will reside in walkable neighborhoods.


Walkability, as we typically think of it in cities, is deeply connected to sustainability, public health and economic development. But foreign policy? That was a new one even for us.


Doherty’s basic idea is that pent-up demand for such communities could help power a new American economic engine in the same way that suburban housing (and all of the consumption that came with it) made America economically and globally powerful in the Cold War era.


Emily Badger

31 Jan 2013


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For a truly sustainable world, we need zero waste cities

For a truly sustainable world, we need zero waste cities | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Choosing sustainable building materials and systems goes beyond considering durability. We need to take life cycle analysis and supply chain into account, and specify the most appropriate materials for a project – the least polluting, most easily recyclable, most energy efficient (least embodied energy) – and from sustainable sources. (...)


The zero waste ethos is a big call, radical in its ramifications, and it requires more than a top-down, government-imposed approach. To be successful, zero waste needs to be embraced and implemented by citizens and community groups, business and industry.

It is already technologically possible to build a zero-waste and zero-carbon-emission city.


The question is – are we willing to do so and transform from consumers to citizens?

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Shareable: The City as Network and Commons

Shareable: The City as Network and Commons | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

The very notion of prosperity is being redefined by a new generation. It no longer means McMansions, SUVs, and Rolexes — baubles which Millennials watched their parents destroy themselves over. Many want something different, and most couldn’t afford the old dream anyway, even if they wanted it. In this new experiment, prosperity is defined by healthy relationships, realizing one’s creative potential, civic participation, meaningful experiences, and purposeful work — all things that actually deliver happiness.


In a sharing economy, products connect us rather than operating as status symbols that divide. Here product service systems and time-tested urban commons like libraries, parks, streets, and public transportation make our daily needs widely accessible. Here access trumps the burdens of ownership. Here we stop destroying our planet chasing a manufactured dream.


Instead, we come home to where prosperity has long been centered — within the vital relationships forged in our homes, neighborhoods, and cities. It’s no accident that Gen Y is flocking to cities in what is the greatest migration in history. But there’s an epoch-making twist beyond these shifts: the Internet widens the circle of sharing beyond family, tribe, and nation to the global scale.


by Neal Gorenflow 

Shareable 13 Nov 12

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Harnessing Diasporas

By Dilip Ratha and Sonia Plaza - Africa can tap some of its millions of emigrants to help development efforts...


"African migrants sent at least $40 billion in remittances to African countries in 2010. The true size of remittance flows, including unrecorded flows, is believed to be significantly larger. Remittances are the most tangible link between migration and development. Remittances are a large source of funding in many African countries: in Lesotho, they are close to 30 percent of GDP; in Cape Verde, Senegal, and Togo, more than 10 percent of GDP. In Egypt, remittances are larger than the revenue from the Suez Canal, and in Morocco they exceed tourism revenue."

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Seoul seeks to become 'Sharing City' via @wwjimd

If you have books piled up at home that you enjoyed reading but now you don’t know what to do with them, you can put them in bookcases set up near the guard’s office of your apartment building. You can also borrow books from other residents.


This is the idea of the “Sharing City,” where people share things, space or information which they possess but are not using.


Seoul Metropolitan Government said Thursday it will promote the idea to raise the social value of individuals’ goods, space, time, information and abilities by facilitating the process of sharing without causing a burden.


“The world is paying attention to an economy based on sharing, not possession. By expanding the sharing culture which we used to have in the past, community culture can be revived. It can also help us save social expenses spent for safety and welfare,” Mayor Park Won-soon said in a press briefing.

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Buying Local: How It Boosts the Economy

Buying Local: How It Boosts the Economy | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

A number of researchers and organizations are taking a closer look at how money flows, and what they're finding shows the profound economic impact of keeping money in town—and how the fate of many communities around the nation and the world increasingly depend on it.


At the most basic level, when you buy local more money stays in the community. The New Economics Foundation, an independent economic think tank based in London, compared what happens when people buy produce at a supermarket vs. a local farmer's market or community supported agriculture (CSA) program and found that twice the money stayed in the community when folks bought locally. "That means those purchases are twice as efficient in terms of keeping the local economy alive," says author and NEF researcher David Boyle. (See the top 10 food trends of 2008.)


Indeed, says Boyle, many local economies are languishing not because too little cash comes in, but as a result of what happens to that money. "Money is like blood. It needs to keep moving around to keep the economy going," he says, noting that when money is spent elsewhere—at big supermarkets, non-locally owned utilities and other services such as on-line retailers—"it flows out, like a wound."

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Jeffrey Sachs on Immigration

Jeffrey Sachs on Immigration | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

"Continued immigration, across cultural and economic divides, is not only inevitable but also broadly beneficial. Immigrants deepen the ties that hold our world together. Today's migrants don't abandon their homelands, but bridge their homelands with their adopted countries. They make links, economic, cultural, and social. Immigration needs to be steady and sure, neither a floodgate nor a trickle. A floodgate would disrupt the long-term processes of social trust and institution building in the host and source countries. A trickle would allow a build-up of global pressures and illegal population movements to an intolerable degree." ~ Jeffery Sachs at Columbia University, New York in 2007.


highlights from his speech.

Arrival Cities on FB.

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Warren Karlenzig: Collective Intelligence--Cities as Global Intelligence Platform

Social media and collaborative technologies--layered with smart systems combining geo-location data with human experience--will make cities the driving sustainability force in a dawning planetary era. Cities will anticipate new risks with rapid urban systems innovation based upon crowdsourcing, virtual and physical communities, and transparent markets sensitive to full carbon and resource costs. Creatively leveraging collective intelligence for clean energy, low carbon mobility and sustainable food and water, the new urban grid will enable high local quality of life, lifelong learning and vibrant green economies.


scoop'd from theurbn.com


“What is the one thing you can do to make a city more sustainable? That’s easy. Stop asking the question: What is the one thing you can do to make a city more sustainable?” How we should really be tackling the debate and issue is by first recognizing that cities are hyper-complex and none exactly alike. Meaning, every single one will have different solutions and every single one will need different solutions as it changes over time. Although these complexities and diversities sound like a strain on our ability to combat the problems faced, Warren Karlenzig argues that the dynamics and inter-connections of urban areas are what give them their “strength against shocks and stresses”. They are our gift and our curse.


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Waitlist Purgatory: 472,000 California Community College Students Don't Have Classes

Waitlist Purgatory: 472,000 California Community College Students Don't Have Classes | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

For a nation that has a goal of having 8 million more college graduates by 2020, we sure do make it tough for students to get an education. Community college students in California looking to gain some new job skills or get some general education credits out of the way before transferring to a four-year university are having to put their dreams on ice due to massive class waitlists. According to an informal survey by the California Community Chancellor’s Office a whopping 472,349 students are currently waitlisted.

 

How did California's community college system, the largest in the nation, get to this point? Three years of budget cuts have gutted more than $809 million from an already cash-strapped system. That means scores of faculty members have been laid off, resulting in axed course sections. The number of class sections available is down 24 percent from the 2008-2009 school year and remaining classes are jam-packed and have lengthy waitlists.

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