Arrival Cities
Follow
Find tag "Data"
8.0K views | +0 today
Arrival Cities
being an immigrant or living in a "slum" is a feature not a bug
Curated by ddrrnt
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by ddrrnt from green streets
Scoop.it!

Networked Intelligent Bicycles Are Transforming Urban Riding

Networked Intelligent Bicycles Are Transforming Urban Riding | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

The world’s first open source piece of hardware was the bicycle, according to the Open Source Hardware Association. To be more precise, it was the draisine, introduced as a two-wheeled human-propelled walking machine in 1817.

Technologists of the day added things like pedals, chains and rubber tires, as the bicycle became one of the world’s most widely used and loved machines. Nearly two centuries and a couple billion bicycles later, entrepreneurs are applying computer controls, GPS and wireless connectivity to bikes to help save the world’s cities from automobile gridlock...


Via Lauren Moss
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Crowd-sourced data hold potential for positive change and human rights abuses

Crowd-sourced data hold potential for positive change and human rights abuses | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

"Citizens become participants in data collection without having to alter their normal routines," Fawkes said. The goal in such cases is less to create scientific data than to create "good-enough data," Fawkes said, that such information could help get the U.N. started in taking a closer look at local needs and developing response plans. Quickly collected crowd-sourced data can enable early interventions and the implementation of social safety nets that can bring quick aid to a disaster zone or political crisis and thereby prevent long-term damage to communities.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from World Changing Games
Scoop.it!

Why Google's Ingress game is a data gold mine

Why Google's Ingress game is a data gold mine | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

The new game sees players do battle via smartphones as they roam their city – but it's paving the way for something even more interesting...


"I'm playing a game called Ingress, which sees players fighting for control of real-world landmarks or monuments - dubbed portals - in their cities. It was released as a mysterious, invite-only beta two weeks ago by a Google spin-off called Niantic Labs. It represents a big step towards ubiquitous, accurate augmented reality (AR), in which real-world objects are annotated with a virtual layer of information that is displayed on a smartphone's camera."


More highlights.


29 November 2012

by Hal Hodson





Via Elle D'Coda
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Keeping Singapore Green with Data and Design | Sustainable Cities Collective

Keeping Singapore Green with Data and Design | Sustainable Cities Collective | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

What would happen if data, not politics or purely commercial development, drove the design of our cities and towns? Singapore is a marvel of efficiency, the result of a dedication to data-driven life design and urban planning. The (ART+DATA) Institute is examining how the philosophy of data-influenced design can be applied to the organization of living, with Singapore as the prime example.


It is not simply a matter of city planning in the traditional sense. The very rhythm of Singapore is based on a marvelously efficient data collection process, which feeds the continuous refinement of urban planning. The Singaporean approach to analytical design contains important lessons, as statistics from the United Nations suggest 70 percent of the world’s population will live in cities by 2050. This kind of growth will put immense pressure on urban infrastructures, many of which are already archaic and crumbling.


The cultures of the Southeast Asian region have historically fueled many of the world’s innovations. Many of these advances are the result of the complex interactions between cultures and technology. As we move more deeply into the 21st century, the technology law of accelerating returns is more evident in Asia than in Europe or America. The rate of change in the way people live is increasing at an exponential rate each year in Asia.


Singapore pioneered the City Biodiversity Index, a statistical calculation used for optimizing the ratio of green space to buildings and population density. As a testament to the poetry of this analytical model, 28 other major cities around the world have adopted it.

London was among the first to adopt the The City Biodiversity Index, which helped improve the impression of this oldest of Northern European cities as experienced by attendees of the 2012 Olympics. My travels to London this summer revealed a city with a renewed and quantifiable emphasis on livable urban space.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Cities: Salvation Or Infestation? : NPR

Cities: Salvation Or Infestation? : NPR | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

There are lots of lines of evidence telling us our current model for cities is unsustainable. Does that mean cities themselves are the problem and we should all move back to the farm?


Urban agriculture and rooftop farms could be part of the solution. There are proposals to make buildings more like plants so that they can get everything they need right where they sit. There are opportunities for using Big Data to make urban energy consumption hyper efficient. In a thousand-thousand ways — some big and some small — there are opportunities to reimagine how cities work and how we work within them. That is pretty awesome.


With seven billion people and counting, it is likely that the density and efficiencies cities enable might be our only hope for a vibrant, high-tech and sustainable civilization. And with 70 percent of the world's population expected to move into cities by 2050, do we really have any choice?


Adam Frank @AdamFrank4

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Our Cities Will Define Our Future

Our Cities Will Define Our Future | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

After the post was vacant for more than a year, Jennifer Keesmaat started this month as the Chief Planner for the City of Toronto.


Canada’s future lies in its urban areas like Metropolitan Toronto, Vancouver, Calgary and Montreal, much more than it does in its resources or agriculture. More than eighty percent of the food grown and resources mined and extracted in Canada is destined for city-customers. Urbanization is driving the wealth creation needed to pay for these materials. Urbanization is also driving most of our big planetary challenges like climate change, loss of biodiversity and soil degradation.


A few things Ms. Keesmaat calls for: greater cooperation between national and local governments (and a better appreciation at the national level on the importance of well-functioning cities); the need for good data and evidence-based decision making; addressing income disparities; the imperative of public transit and affordable housing; job creation; and better provision and use of infrastructure in suburbs.


more at Sustainable Cities Collective

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

The Internet Is the New Town Hall and Soon Cities Will Be Listening

The Internet Is the New Town Hall and Soon Cities Will Be Listening | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

"Sentiment analysis" of social media could change the way you report potholes forever.


The challenge for cities is how they might parse social media sentiment about not just one dish detergent (or one frequently Googled query during flu season), but about numerous interlocking indexes of civic life. Are parents in Chicago supportive of the teachers’ strike? What are New York subway riders saying about that new trash program? Or Los Angelenos about the crackdown on pot dispensaries? Is there a flare-up of graffiti concern on the west side of the city? Or a collision on the east side about to erupt into an all-out traffic jam?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from Digital Footprint
Scoop.it!

"The Quantified Community" by Esther Dyson | Project Syndicate

"The Quantified Community" by Esther Dyson | Project Syndicate | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
Just as monitoring devices and software enable people to measure and improve their own health and behavior, communities can quantify their performance by collecting and analyzing untapped data.

 

In the same way, I predict (and am trying to foster) the emergence of a Quantified Community movement, with communities measuring the state, health, and activities of their people and institutions, thereby improving them. Just consider: each town has its own schools, library, police, roads and bridges, businesses, and, of course, people. All of them potentially generate a lot of data, most of it uncollected and unanalyzed. That is about to change.

 

A news company could encourage contests within neighborhoods or with other communities to become healthier, fix more potholes, reduce the rate of traffic accidents, or curb drunk driving. Just as competition with other individuals is part of the Quantified Self movement, so competition with other communities will be part of the Quantified Community movement.


Via Peter Vander Auwera
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

In Praise of Slums - By Charles Kenny

In Praise of Slums - By Charles Kenny | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Slum dwellers may be at the bottom of the urban heap, but most are better off than their rural counterparts. Although about half the world's population is urban, only a quarter of those living on less than a dollar a day live in urban areas. In Brazil, for example, where the word "poor" conjures images of both Rio's vertiginous favelas and indigenous Amazonian tribes living in rural privation, only 5 percent of the urban population is classified as extremely poor, compared with 25 percent of those living in rural areas.

 

... better quality of life is because of better access to services. Data from surveys across the developing world suggest that poor households in urban areas are more than twice as likely to have piped water as those in rural areas, and they're nearly four times more likely to have a flush toilet. In India, very poor urban women are about as likely to get prenatal care as the non-poor in rural areas. And in 70 percent of countries surveyed by MIT economists Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo, school enrollment for girls ages 7 to 12 is higher among the urban poor than the rural poor.

 

Banerjee and Duflo found that, among people living on less than a dollar a day, infant mortality rates in urban areas were lower than rural rates in two-thirds of the countries for which they had data. In India, the death rate for babies in the first month of life is nearly one-quarter lower in urban areas than in rural villages. So significant is the difference in outcomes that population researcher Martin Brockerhoff concludes that "millions of children's lives may have been saved" in the 1980s alone as the result of mothers worldwide moving to urban areas.

 

As Harvard University economist Edward Glaeser puts it, slums don't make people poor -- they attract poor people who want to be rich. So let's help them help themselves.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

How Can You Measure Income Inequality? Count The Trees - COLORLINES

How Can You Measure Income Inequality? Count The Trees - COLORLINES | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Turns out there’s a direct correlation between the number of trees a neighborhood has and its monetary wealth — and we can see how this dynamic plays out in space. Environmental journalist Tim De Chant mapped it all out for us on his blog, Per Square Mile, where he worked up a small project called “Income Inequality, As Seen From Space.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Technology Gives Form and Face to a Forgotten Place

Technology Gives Form and Face to a Forgotten Place | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

In 2008, the world became mostly urban, when for the first time, more people lived in cities than rural areas. That year, we also crossed an important technological threshold – for the first time there were more mobile broadband Internet subscribers than fixed. A new book by Anthony Townsend, SMART CITIES: Big Data, Civic Hackers, and the Quest for a New Utopia, explores the intersection of these historic shifts. With the UN projecting that 90 percent of population growth in coming decades will occur in cities throughout the developing world, new solutions are needed to address the rapid expansion of informal settlements. In this excerpt, Townsend explains how a new volunteer effort Map Kibera is combining consumer technologies and open source GIS to chart one of Africa’s largest and most notorious slums.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

City living: There's an app for that 

In broadest terms, giving the population access to municipal data doesn't just generate apps, it changes the relationship between citizen and city. "It's greater than applications," said Jay Nath, chief innovation officer for the City of San Francisco. "For me, it's almost a new type of civic engagement."


That's the ethos that guides Code for America, which serves as a developer version of the Peace Corps for federal, state and local government. The nonprofit teams volunteer developers, known as fellows, with municipalities looking to create new apps and services with their data.


One signature Code for America app is Boston's Adopt a Hydrant program, which solved a persistent and dangerous city problem -- hydrants plowed in after snowstorms -- by pairing concerned citizens with individual hydrants to maintain. Honolulu uses the same model to deputize citizens to make sure the tsunami warning sirens near their homes have working batteries.


In total, Code for America has partnered with 11 American cities, developing and brainstorming apps similar to Boston's. "You can demonstrate to the large bureaucracy, 'This is what you get when you open up data,'" said Mark Headd, government affairs director for the organization


by Jason Slotkin

11 Jan 2013


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Smart Cities – Creating Intelligent Urban Environments

Smart Cities – Creating Intelligent Urban Environments | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

The 21st century will be dominated by the city. More than half the world's population lives in cities, and the percentage is growing rapidly.


Today’s cities can barely handle the burden of their current populations: core services like energy, water, communications, transportation, and public safety are wasteful, inefficient and decrepit. Even though cities only occupy 2% of the landmass of the Earth, they consume over 75% of the Earth’s resources. The only way to prevent rapid urbanization from being an environmental disaster is to operate cities in a brand new way: faster, smarter, cleaner.


A city becomes “smart” when all parts of its infrastructure and government services are digitally connected and optimized. The city’s intelligent infrastructure is powered by three key technologies that share environment and citizen data constantly: sensors, the cloud and smart interfaces. Sensors, tiny devices that can measure variables such as motion, sound, and bacteria, collect information and send it back to a central database - the cloud. The city’s computing cloud then analyzes the information and changes the city in response to the input it has received, whether from sensors. Residents can also change the city experience, tailoring it to themselves by entering their preferences in touch screen smart applications. For example, if you’re feeling unwell, you could take your blood pressure at home, and the results will automatically be added to your health record, which is stored in digital format in the city’s cloud. If the blood pressure is at a dangerous level, your doctor is automatically paged, and soon, he appears on the Telepresence monitor in your apartment where he gives you a quick consultation.


by Ayesha and Parag Khanna

Macrowikinomics - Mar. 21 2011


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Towards a social change enlightenment

Towards a social change enlightenment | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

As David Bornstein claims, we are riding the verge of a social change enlightenment.


Successful social change programs are targeting the heart as well as the head, effecting change by appealing to ‘non-rational’ factors such as emotion, group identity, and relationships. (...)


At the heart of the social change enlightenment, there is a new emphasis on data and facts to evaluate the impact of social change programs. Where the historical exponents of Enlightenment used scientific experiments and logical arguments to explain the world, we are drawing on the infinite capacities of online data clouds and innovative data visualization tools to make social change challenges and solutions apparent to all. This is radically reducing costs and exponentially boosting the effectiveness of social change programs. (...)


Smart data can feed into social change in three main ways:


1. Data visualization. Visualizing problems makes it easier to respond to them. We see this in the world of crisis mapping. In the 2010 Haitian earthquake, Ushahidi’s crisis mapping tools were hailed as a breakthrough innovation.


2. ‘Socialize’ the process of systems change with smart interactive campaigns. Smart data doesn’t just enable us to visualize problems, it opens up new ways of mobilizing crowds to engage with them too. We can take inspiration here from flashmob culture and groups like ImprovEverywhere, who seek to create ‘scenes of chaos and joy in public places’.


3. Empower entrepreneurs to engage with social change initiatives. The most talented people in the world are not necessarily working for social change organizations. This doesn’t mean that they are not willing to pitch in and get involved. (...)


Our collective capacity today is truly miraculous. All that we need are tools to transform this capacity into millions of enlightened actions.


read more here.


OCTOBER 31, 2012

BY TIMRAYNER

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

How Open Data Initiatives Can Improve City Life

How Open Data Initiatives Can Improve City Life | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
Building apps that make use of government data may not be feasible for many cities, but opening that data up to the developer community has proven fruitful for some.


Major city governments across North America are looking for ways to share civic data — which normally resides behind secure firewalls — with private developers who can leverage it to serve city residents via web and mobile apps. Cities can spend on average between $20,000 and $50,000 — even as much as $100,000 — to cover the costs of opening data, but that’s a small price to pay when you consider how much is needed to develop a custom application that might not be nearly as useful.


15 Feb 11 by Aliza Sherman

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from Machines Pensantes
Scoop.it!

How The "Internet Of Things" Is Turning Cities Into Living Organisms | Fast Company

How The "Internet Of Things" Is Turning Cities Into Living Organisms | Fast Company | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

With a little help from what's called the Internet of Things, engineers are transforming cities from passive conduits for water into dynamic systems that store and manage it like the tissues of desert animals.


With a little help from what's called the Internet of Things, engineers are transforming cities from passive conduits for water into dynamic systems that store and manage it like the tissues of desert animals. By using the Internet to connect real-world sensors and control mechanisms to cloud-based control systems that can pull in streams from any other data source, including weather reports, these efforts enable conservation and money-saving measures that would have been impossible without this virtual nervous system.


Via association concert urbain
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Warren Karlenzig: Collective Intelligence--Cities as Global Intelligence Platform

Social media and collaborative technologies--layered with smart systems combining geo-location data with human experience--will make cities the driving sustainability force in a dawning planetary era. Cities will anticipate new risks with rapid urban systems innovation based upon crowdsourcing, virtual and physical communities, and transparent markets sensitive to full carbon and resource costs. Creatively leveraging collective intelligence for clean energy, low carbon mobility and sustainable food and water, the new urban grid will enable high local quality of life, lifelong learning and vibrant green economies.


scoop'd from theurbn.com


“What is the one thing you can do to make a city more sustainable? That’s easy. Stop asking the question: What is the one thing you can do to make a city more sustainable?” How we should really be tackling the debate and issue is by first recognizing that cities are hyper-complex and none exactly alike. Meaning, every single one will have different solutions and every single one will need different solutions as it changes over time. Although these complexities and diversities sound like a strain on our ability to combat the problems faced, Warren Karlenzig argues that the dynamics and inter-connections of urban areas are what give them their “strength against shocks and stresses”. They are our gift and our curse.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

U.S. Cities Unify Their Data To Make All Cities Smarter

U.S. Cities Unify Their Data To Make All Cities Smarter | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
Chicago, Seattle, New York, and San Francisco are now in one place. Data.gov, the federal government’s warehouse for public data, has opened its doors to America’s major cities at cities.data.gov.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

How slums can save the planet

How slums can save the planet | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

The article starts with the story of architect Peter Calthorpe, one of the founders of the new urbanism: "In 1985 he introduced the concept of walkability in “Redefining Cities,” an article in the Whole Earth Review, an American counterculture magazine that focused on technology, community building and the environment."


A fact from the UN: one billion people live in cities and this number will double in the next 25 years.


A 2003 UN-Habitat report titled The Challenge of Slums, covers 37 case studies involving slums worldwide. The researchers talked with people in the slums and observed:


“Cities are so much more successful in promoting new forms of income generation, and it is so much cheaper to provide services in urban areas, that some experts have actually suggested that the only realistic poverty reduction strategy is to get as many people as possible to move to the city.”


The "magic of squatter cities" is seen in how their inhabitants steadily improve conditions. People get around by foot and bicycle.  Recycling is "a way of life" and in cities in Asia and Latin America entire industries based on gathering up old cardboard boxes have emerged. The article further explores how slums help form "unexpectedly green" cities. Definitely worth a full read if you're into this idea.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

How data could save cities from outgrowing themselves

How data could save cities from outgrowing themselves | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
According to physicist Geoffrey West, the world's cities have what one might call a growing problem. As they grow bigger, their problems grow worse, which means it takes an ever-faster pace of innovation to keep things in check.
more...
No comment yet.