Arrival Cities
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Arrival Cities
being an immigrant or living in a "slum" is a feature not a bug
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What are Startup Cities?

What are Startup Cities? | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
Today's pace of innovation in law and governance is slow because we do not allow for entrepreneurial innovation in it. Think of it this way: we set up a legal and political system so that markets work and entrepreneurs can solve tons of problems. Entrepreneurs everywhere work in parallel. They try different things from the ground up.  Markets are problem-solving machines, bringing good ideas to life. Millions of people all search through trial-and-error for a solution to a customer's problem. We accept this as natural in most areas of our lives.

But we don't accept this in the most important area: the way we structure communities themselves. We marvel at the problem-solving ability of entrepreneurs. But we’re also always complaining about corruption or poverty in our legal and political systems.

We don’t have progress in law and governance because we don’t allow startup entrepreneurship to bring new solutions to citizens.
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The Mayors Shall Inherit the Earth

The Mayors Shall Inherit the Earth | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Cities may be prideful of their autonomy, but they are fundamentally interconnected. More and more, they even look the same. They fly signage and advertising rather than flags; they are defined by connectivity and hence motion, never by stasis; and they are driven by aspiration, rather than history. They trade in risk and cultivate danger. Mayors don’t talk like presidents and prime ministers about autonomy and sovereignty and self-determination. They are compelled to persuade rather than enact and order, to debate rather than proclaim and pontificate. When they do talk, it is about crime, transportation and jobs; about plowing the snow and picking up the garbage. They focus on common problems rather than distinctive identities. The absence of sovereignty becomes a virtue: Local politicians don’t build walls, they build ports and bridges. They define success by how well they integrate, communicate and network with one another. No wonder New York and Shanghai are willing to share best practices and learn from one another while China and the United States bicker.

 

Cities may already constitute networks of collaboration that influence the global economy and bypass the rules and regulations of states, but they lie within the jurisdiction and sovereignty of superior political bodies. Mayor Bloomberg may have his own army, but let him try to deploy it in Cuba or Washington, D.C., or Albany—or even across the river in Hoboken or up in Yonkers, a few miles north of New York. He can route bikes through Manhattan, but try doing it on the state thruway or elsewhere along the interstate highway system. Unlike corporations, countries are territorial by definition, and cities always sit on land that is part of some nation’s territory. New York may not be looking to Washington, but Washington is paying attention to New York.

 

ddrrnt's insight:

ht @Michael Josefowicz

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Abandoned Walmart is Now America’s Largest Library | WebUrbanist

Abandoned Walmart is Now America’s Largest Library | WebUrbanist | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

There are thousands of abandoned big box stores sitting empty all over America, including hundreds of former Walmart stores. With each store taking up enough space for 2.5 football fields, Walmart’s use of more than 698 million square feet of land in the U.S. is one of its biggest environmental impacts. But at least one of those buildings has been transformed into something arguably much more useful: the nation’s largest library.

 

A sprawling abandoned Walmart in McAllen, Texas has been transformed into the nation's largest public library, with self-check-out kiosks and an art gallery.

 

 

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Mimiboard. The Virtual Noticeboard. Empowering Local Communities

South Africa-based Umuntu Media, as part of a mission to help communities create and find useful content, decided to bring the news board online.

 

Mimiboard marks an evolution of the way local information can be shared. It is simply the digital manifestation of a time-trusted product many Africans can relate to. At the same time, Mimiboard is not just a traditional news portal. It allows for mobile sharing and provides a great user experience – something previous online forums have failed to accomplish.

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HDNet - "Art From The Ashes: Detroit's Heidelberg Project"

The Heidelberg Project is a living outdoor art installation in the heart of urban Detroit. Artist Tyree Guyton created a massive art installation spanning two city blocks where deteriorating homes are reinvigorated with paint and repurposed materials. In the video above, you’ll see some of the somewhat wild colors (from pastels to brilliant primary colors), patterns (polkadots), and materials (stuffed animals).


Much like Jimmy Boggs’ mantra to “make a way out of no way,” Guyton says the philosophy of his 25-year project is “to take nothing, and to take that nothing and create something very beautiful, very whimsical to the point that it makes people think.”


onBeing.org

Susan Leem

02 Feb 2012


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Pursuing 'Ecological Citizenship'

Pursuing 'Ecological Citizenship' | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
I am talking about the ideas that deal with the reshaping of our identities, as both individuals and communities, given what we now know about the changing living conditions on our planet, and of a new sense of identification with, and commitment to, those who will be affected in the future by the way we live right now, by both what we are doing and what we are not doing yet. I am talking about a new notion of citizenship that is called for by the demands of the ecological crisis, an “ecological citizenship” of a global scope, that can best be promoted by, well, the one global body of nations we have. -- Ilan Safit
ddrrnt's insight:

A sustainable role to play as citizens of the earth, considering the impact of our behaviors and new means of participating with our local communities.

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Shareable: The Launch of A Community Sharing Hub

Shareable: The Launch of A Community Sharing Hub | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

With all the justified excitement forming around the burgeoning sharing economy, we sometimes overlook the fact that sharing is indeed a very old tradition. Though use of the internet and social media has certainly popularized this old custom – and even given it a well-deserved second wind – the key to the sharing economy’s survival still rests on its potential to generate a true sense of community. In order to continue its amazing trajectory and stand the test of time, perhaps it still needs to hold fast to its roots, its sense of place, its solid foundation in real life communities. Luckily for the sharing economy, even good old-fashioned community organizations are starting to catch on.


Read more about the "Community Sharing Hub" from Phinney Neighborhood Association (PNA).

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Communities Aren't Just Places, They're Social Networks

Communities Aren't Just Places, They're Social Networks | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Cities are obviously more than just the sum of their physical assets — roads and bridges, offices, factories, shopping centers, and homes — working more like living organisms than jumbles of concrete. Their inner workings even transcend their ability to cluster and concentrate people and economic activity. As sociologist Zachary Neal of Michigan State University argues in his new book, The Connected City, cities are made up of human social networks.


Does the design of streets, for example, influence who our friends are?


What are the key factors that shape the networks of a connected city?


To what degree do influential people matter to the connected city? 


Via David Hodgson
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Seoul seeks to become 'Sharing City' via @wwjimd

If you have books piled up at home that you enjoyed reading but now you don’t know what to do with them, you can put them in bookcases set up near the guard’s office of your apartment building. You can also borrow books from other residents.


This is the idea of the “Sharing City,” where people share things, space or information which they possess but are not using.


Seoul Metropolitan Government said Thursday it will promote the idea to raise the social value of individuals’ goods, space, time, information and abilities by facilitating the process of sharing without causing a burden.


“The world is paying attention to an economy based on sharing, not possession. By expanding the sharing culture which we used to have in the past, community culture can be revived. It can also help us save social expenses spent for safety and welfare,” Mayor Park Won-soon said in a press briefing.

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Buying Local: How It Boosts the Economy

Buying Local: How It Boosts the Economy | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

A number of researchers and organizations are taking a closer look at how money flows, and what they're finding shows the profound economic impact of keeping money in town—and how the fate of many communities around the nation and the world increasingly depend on it.


At the most basic level, when you buy local more money stays in the community. The New Economics Foundation, an independent economic think tank based in London, compared what happens when people buy produce at a supermarket vs. a local farmer's market or community supported agriculture (CSA) program and found that twice the money stayed in the community when folks bought locally. "That means those purchases are twice as efficient in terms of keeping the local economy alive," says author and NEF researcher David Boyle. (See the top 10 food trends of 2008.)


Indeed, says Boyle, many local economies are languishing not because too little cash comes in, but as a result of what happens to that money. "Money is like blood. It needs to keep moving around to keep the economy going," he says, noting that when money is spent elsewhere—at big supermarkets, non-locally owned utilities and other services such as on-line retailers—"it flows out, like a wound."

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What to Do When the Oceans Rise

What to Do When the Oceans Rise | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

The costs of either rebuilding or relocating in response are enormous but unavoidable. Furthermore, since the economies of many coastal communities are based on fisheries and tourism, the impacts of anthropogenic climate change threaten their long-term sustainability.


Given their vulnerability, coastal communities are on the front line of global warming. But do they have the capacity to adapt to so much environmental change? Do their responses to past challenges suggest strategies for coping with future change? Can we predict which communities are most vulnerable and help them to become more resilient?

 


Via Complexity Digest, David Hodgson
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Long Beach: Finding Ways to Get More People Walk

Long Beach: Finding Ways to Get More People Walk | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

“Our vision for the walking program is to promote livable neighborhoods for residents and visitors through exploration on foot,” stated Melissa Wheeler, Healthy Communities Director for the YMCA of Greater Long Beach. She emphasized that, beyond direct health and environmental benefits, increasing walkability will also provide gains in relation to economic vitality, climate change, traffic congestion, social cohesion, and community safety.

 

via Streetsblog Los Angeles

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Vacant Lots Turned Green Reduce Crime, Study Says - Earth911.com

Vacant Lots Turned Green Reduce Crime, Study Says - Earth911.com | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Greening old, vacant lots comes with plenty of healthy benefits to communities, but it might also help reduce crime, according to a new University of Pennsylvania study.

 

Researchers started with two types of lots consisting controlled vacant, overgrown lots and ones renovated with help from the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society, who cleaned, planted trees and grass and build a wooden fence around each lot. Researchers interviewed 21 residents near each lot before and after the experiment. Residents living around greened lots said they felt safer following the renovations.

 

Researchers also looked at crime statistics three months before the renovations and three months after. Areas with greened lots saw a total reduction in crime, including gun crime and assault without guns. The researchers attribute the reduction to an overall sense of community in areas with greened lots. Additionally, greened lots limit options to hide illegal activities, such as hiding illegal guns or drug use.

 

http://injuryprevention.bmj.com/content/early/2012/08/06/injuryprev-2012-040439

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Finding small villages in big cities

Finding small villages in big cities | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Daily life in cities tends to differ from daily life in small towns, especially by who we interact with. The MIT Senseable City Lab and the Santa Fe Institute studied this social aspect — individuals' contacts by city size — through anonymized mobile phone logs.

. . .

It seems that even in large cities we tend to build tightly knit communities, or 'villages,' around ourselves. There is an important difference, though: if in a real village our connections might simply be defined by proximity, in a large city we can elect a community based on any number of factors, from affinity to interest to sexual preference.

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Resilience Through Placemaking

Resilience Through Placemaking | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

A common thread found in Resilience theory is that of community strength. A community’s ability to survive and even thrive during tough times is largely decided both in the way that community builds itself around its physical places and also in the way people work and band together to create those spaces.

The art of place-making is arguably the best demonstration of community resilience at work. By definition placemaking involves the residents of a community – it’s not the product of an architect’s pen but rather the result of a community-designer-builder collaboration over time.

ddrrnt's insight:

"Placemaking co-evolves with imagination, inspiration, interaction, individual agency, inference, information, insights, interdependence, infrastructure and intangible assets." @JohnKellden - http://goo.gl/rzodgK

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Urban resilience in a time of change - Colombes

Urban resilience in a time of change - Colombes | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Agrocité is an urban agriculture programme in the suburb of Colombes, which is an underprivileged town of 84,000 inhabitants near the city of Paris. The pilot programme that started in early 2012 is designed to introduce the dynamics of urban agriculture to community life. This will reconnect neighbours to one another and their living environment, empower them, and help revitalise a neglected urban context. The project includes a micro-experimental farm, community gardens, educational and cultural spaces, and devices for energy production, composting and rainwater recycling.

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Connecting Citizens To Their Government By Turning It Into A Game

Connecting Citizens To Their Government By Turning It Into A Game | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

PlanIt is a game about the issues that face local government, designed to get people (especially young people) more involved and understanding of what goes in to managing their communities.

 

It works like this: A group--say, a planning commission or small business--puts up a few hundred dollars for community investment. Players register on the PlanIt platform, and take part in three "missions." To win pledgeable "coins," they complete "challenges" within each mission. Then the projects with the most pledged coins get real cash to spend.

 

About half the players so far have been under 18. Gordon says younger people add a lot of competitive spirit, and are important for encouraging others to play. "This is their first introduction to anything to do with civic engagement. They provide really meaningful input into these issues. And not only that, they also tend to motivate the adults."

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Summary of recent happiness research

Summary of recent happiness research | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
The “set point” theorists have argued that everyone has some baseline level of happiness (some are relatively happy, some unhappy) and that good or bad events (winning a lottery, losing a leg) momentarily dislodge a person from their set point but they return to their baseline level of happiness over a period of months or years. Helliwell says that the data do not support this notion that we adapt to everything.

[UPDATED 6/1/2012]
ddrrnt's insight:

Happiness in the City : Tracking Well-being


The Social Capital Blog has been reporting on some happiness and subjective wellbeing research. [See this post and this], including a post on how the UK government is starting to track happiness with a goal of increasing national well-being.


Keep an eye on John Helliwell, emeritus professor of economics at UBC and co-director of a CIFAR panel, who is looking into Social Interactions, Identity and Wellbeing.  The article summarizes the three major points of his and other's recent research on happiness in the social context of well-being.


1. The positive trumps the negative

2. Community trumps materialism

3. Generosity trumps selfishness


"Helliwell believes that a participatory process is key to happiness."  He references the work of  Alex Haslam, a social psychologist who found that unhappy workers at an eldercare facility became happier by "collectively designing" the public spaces at a new workplace they moved to.


In context of Arrival Cities, Heliwell noted that "immigration challenges community levels of happiness since it is harder for immigrants to get involved and be connected", due to severd relationships from homelands, language issues, and difficulty of connecting with community while holding down multiple jobs.  he points ot the work of Irene Bloemraad on multiculturalism involving the "bonding and bridging social ties" of both migrants to fellow migrants and natives. It is said that "bonding ties often precede the bridging ties and it is not until immigrants feel that they have their own bonding support networks that they feel comfortable reaching out."



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Startup Spotlight: How to fund civic projects without the government

Startup Spotlight: How to fund civic projects without the government | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Jase Wilson is the founder of Neighbor.ly, a crowd funding platform for civic projects. Organizations can post projects on the site and raise money from the community. Neighbor.ly grew out of Wilson’s frustration at community meetings. A self-identified “city geek,” he has two degrees in urban planning and design. Time and time again, Wilson heard great ideas and proposals, but the common denominator was a lack of resources to make them happen. He decided to create an alternative channel for municipal fundraising.


“Cities are broke,” Wilson said. “People need civic projects- the economy, jobs, and quality of life all benefit when good civic projects happen. It’s a problem that needs innovation now. We built Neighbor.ly to help greenlight civic projects, even when the community budget is not so awesome.” (...)


Grassroots movements are picking up around the country and Wilson and his small team are picking up where Kickstarter leaves off by focusing on civic initiatives. In addition to a financial platform, they also provide their expertise and knowledge surrounding urban planning. Wilson said depending on how things progress with the economy, this type of model would be a useful alternative for keeping certain government services alive. Only time will tell.


Rebecca Grant

26 Oct 2012

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We are shaking the world with a new dream

We are shaking the world with a new dream | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

In Detroit, everything is in your face: (the following is taken from Margaret Wheatley’s invitation to the learning journey)


“Detroit is a place of stark and compelling contrasts and contradictions. Once the fourth largest city in America that glowed with the promise of industrialization, it is now an embodied prophecy of the post-industrial world, a world where:


  • citizens have been abandoned by their government and corporations
  • factories that employed tens of thousands of workers now lie in ruins
  • 1/3 of the land once filled with homes and neighborhoods is now grassy fields
  • public schools are shuttered and closed
  • drugs, high crime, and criminalization by the authorities plague youth and destroy their future


Like abandoned citizens everywhere, when people realize that no one is coming to help, the possibility of community arises. As people stop looking outside themselves and turn to one another, they discover the richness of resources to be found within themselves, their cultures and their land. Nowhere in the Western world is this discovery of community-as-resource more vibrant than in Detroit.”


recommended reading at

Brave New World - stories from the new paradigm

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Growing Rogue Proves Urban Farming Strengthens Communities

Growing Rogue Proves Urban Farming Strengthens Communities | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Growing Rogue has started its first urban farm at a large apartment complex, (Singleton Housing), near 19th Ave. and Maryland in Phoenix. When Kristopher Corter and Andrew Pisher got started with the farm the people in the neighborhood tried warning them that the neighborhood was a dangerous one, that there was a lot of crime and drugs in that area and there was concern about people vandalizing the farm or stealing the large drums that stored the soil and plants. With confidence Mr. Corter and Mr. Pisher continued their work shoveling dirt and soil into the food drums in the large covered parking lot out back and in time residents of the apartment complex wanted to help and passersby would see the work and stop to help shovel soil. In less than two weeks of work neighbors are already commenting on how they have seen less crime and drug related activity and the neighborhood feels a little safer already.

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Bicycle Superhighway in the city of Copenhagen

Bicycle Superhighway in the city of Copenhagen | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

As the Times reports, the city of Copenhagen has launched the first of 26 planned suburban commuter arteries built exclusively for bicycles: long, well-paved, carefully maintained bike paths to link its suburbs with the inner city, up to 14 miles long and requiring the cooperation of 21 separate municipal governments.


These are the numbers the Times reports. Remarkably, the story makes no mention of the extraordinary figure for cycling’s modal share in Copenhagen, so I will: fully 37 percent of Copenhagen residents — and 55 percent of downtown dwellers — use bikes as their primary mode of transportation.


Read more -> Three reasons why Copenhagen is the world leader in urban sustainability


Via Laurence Serfaty, Wa Gon, David Hodgson, Anne Caspari
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Empathy, Education, and Musical Chairs: brains are actually primed for both competition and cooperation

Empathy, Education, and Musical Chairs: brains are actually primed for both competition and cooperation | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

...As it turns out, however, recent scientific advancements in the field of neuroscience are showing that actually, these parents--and everyone else who believes that people are only inherently competitive--are wrong. Instead, human brains are actually primed for both competition and cooperation: which side of us emerges as more dominant is dependent on our culture....

 

But of course, right now, our culture does not nurture empathy and cooperation. Instead, in schools, our homes, in the media, and in every aspect of our lives, we value competition...

 

Multiple fields of scientific research, including neuroscience, primatology, evolutionary biology, cognitive ethology (the study of animal behavior in naturalistic settings), social psychology, and subfields in philosophy have produced enough evidence over the past two decades to confirm that our greatest hope for the future rests in understanding the real possibilities of human biology, and beginning to translate these findings into our culture (de Waal, 2009).

 

by Nadine Dolby

img via wikipedia


 


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Parks Are Part of Our Healthcare System

Parks Are Part of Our Healthcare System | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

“Parks are a part of our healthcare system,” said Dr. Daphne Miller, a professor of family and community medicine, University of California, San Francisco, at the Greater & Greener: Reimagining Parks for 21st Century Cities, a conference in New York City. She said these green spaces are crucial to solving hypertension, anxiety, depression, diabetes — “the diseases of indoor living.” The more someone spends outdoors, the less likely they are to suffer from mental or physical disorders. But she said parks officials and the medical profession still needs more data to take aim at the many “naysayers on the other side” who don’t believe in what every landscape architect values.


Via nancercize, Kirk Fontaine
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Kirk Fontaine's comment, August 25, 2012 10:08 PM
thanks nancericize More attention and funds should be focused on the outdoor resources that are healthy as well cheap - it is a no-brainer
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"The Quantified Community" by Esther Dyson | Project Syndicate

"The Quantified Community" by Esther Dyson | Project Syndicate | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
Just as monitoring devices and software enable people to measure and improve their own health and behavior, communities can quantify their performance by collecting and analyzing untapped data.

 

In the same way, I predict (and am trying to foster) the emergence of a Quantified Community movement, with communities measuring the state, health, and activities of their people and institutions, thereby improving them. Just consider: each town has its own schools, library, police, roads and bridges, businesses, and, of course, people. All of them potentially generate a lot of data, most of it uncollected and unanalyzed. That is about to change.

 

A news company could encourage contests within neighborhoods or with other communities to become healthier, fix more potholes, reduce the rate of traffic accidents, or curb drunk driving. Just as competition with other individuals is part of the Quantified Self movement, so competition with other communities will be part of the Quantified Community movement.


Via Peter Vander Auwera
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