Arrival Cities
8.7K views | +0 today
Follow
Arrival Cities
being an immigrant or living in a "slum" is a feature not a bug
Curated by ddrrnt
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

MBAs must focus on urban explosion - YouTube

In the next 35 years 2bn rural people will move to cities. Reuben Abraham of India’s IFDC Institute tells Della Bradshaw, FT business education editor, that MBAs must focus on the business opportunities of rapid urbanisation in developing countries.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Startup Spotlight: How to fund civic projects without the government

Startup Spotlight: How to fund civic projects without the government | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Jase Wilson is the founder of Neighbor.ly, a crowd funding platform for civic projects. Organizations can post projects on the site and raise money from the community. Neighbor.ly grew out of Wilson’s frustration at community meetings. A self-identified “city geek,” he has two degrees in urban planning and design. Time and time again, Wilson heard great ideas and proposals, but the common denominator was a lack of resources to make them happen. He decided to create an alternative channel for municipal fundraising.


“Cities are broke,” Wilson said. “People need civic projects- the economy, jobs, and quality of life all benefit when good civic projects happen. It’s a problem that needs innovation now. We built Neighbor.ly to help greenlight civic projects, even when the community budget is not so awesome.” (...)


Grassroots movements are picking up around the country and Wilson and his small team are picking up where Kickstarter leaves off by focusing on civic initiatives. In addition to a financial platform, they also provide their expertise and knowledge surrounding urban planning. Wilson said depending on how things progress with the economy, this type of model would be a useful alternative for keeping certain government services alive. Only time will tell.


Rebecca Grant

26 Oct 2012

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from Yellow Boat Social Entrepreneurism
Scoop.it!

Local Food Systems | Helping entrepreneurs work together to grow businesses rooted in agriculture

Local Food Systems | Helping entrepreneurs work together to grow businesses rooted in agriculture | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

http://www.localfoodsystems.org/entrepreneursinag/

Helping entrepreneurs work together to grow businesses rooted in agriculture


Site goals . . .

Promoting strong local and regional economies by offering tools that help entrepreneurs build business ecosystems rooted in agriculture.


Entrepreneurs can use the tools on this site to connect their business idea into a supply chain network of locally owned businesses, existing and planned, and together with other entrepreneurs and locally owned businesses find the capital needed to launch their businesses. Food is of particular interest both to entrepreneurs and consumers, hence the name localfoodsystems.org, but other basic needs like energy, equipment, services and materials that are part of agriculture are of equal importance.

 

Who is behind this . . .

This site is a project of the Agroecosystems Management Program of The Ohio State University, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center and many collaborators in Ohio, Michigan and Pennsylvania.  Site development has been supported by a USDA Specialty Crops Research Initiative Regional Partnerships for Innovation Grant (posted here) as well as a structural change grant from the Fund for Our Economic Future in Northeast Ohio (information here). 

 

Why . . .

1.    We have the people, land and climate needed to produce fresh, affordable, and healthy food, renewable energy, shelter and the things we use daily.

2.    Our growing community of entrepreneurs, producers and consumers can create strong local economies by creating new locally owned businesses and jobs.

3.    Vibrant local and regional agriculture generates wealth in communities, establishes healthy environments for families, and enhances quality of life for all.



Via Rick Passo
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from Instead of Money $$$
Scoop.it!

Restaurant Lets Patrons Pay For Meal With Fruits And Vegetables

Restaurant Lets Patrons Pay For Meal With Fruits And Vegetables | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Reports of a restaurant in Italy that allows its patrons to pay with fruits and vegetables have us wanting to plant a garden in our backyard.

 

Why not get this started in the USA & elsewhere? Go talk with your favorite healthy restaurants!


Via Elle D'Coda
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Jugaad: A New Growth Formula for Corporate America

Frugal innovation is a hot topic today as post-downturn corporate America looks for ways to do more for less, while serving broader markets.


Jugaad-minded entrepreneurs turn adversity — such as widespread scarcity of natural and financial resources in India — into an opportunity to innovate and create more valuable products and services at less cost for more people.


How can Western organizations concretely put Jugaad in practice? 


Thrift not waste. This first rule — which promotes frugality — helps tackle scarcity of all forms of resources.


Inclusion, not exclusion. This second rule helps entrepreneurial organizations to put inclusiveness into practice — by tightly connecting with, and harnessing, the growing diversity that permeates their communities of customers, employees, and partners.


Bottom-up participation, not top-down command and control. This third rule drives collaboration. CEOs who tend to act as conductors must learn to facilitate collaborative improvisation just as players in jazz bands do.


Flexible thinking and action, not linear planning. This fourth rule facilitates flexibility in thinking and action. Jugaad-practicing firms are highly adaptable as they aren’t wedded to any single business model and pursue multiple options at any time.


Also see the 6 Principles of Jugaad innovation on our FB page.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Rooftop Garden Feeds Cafe Customers Below

Rooftop Garden Feeds Cafe Customers Below | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

We've seen a supermarket growing produce on its roof in London, and Brooklyn looks set to be the home of some massive rooftop farms in the near future.

 

But rooftop agriculture doesn't need to be big, nor does it have to be high tech.

 

Here we see Jon of Growing Your Greens visit Catch A Healthy Habit Cafe in Fairfield, CT where the cafe owners have been growing food on their cafe roof for the customers below.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from 'Next Economy and Wealth'
Scoop.it!

The Rise of the New Economy Movement

The Rise of the New Economy Movement | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

From cooperatives, to employee owned businesses to social responsible companies to complementary currencies... we are birthing!


Via Ferananda
more...
Peace Overtures's curator insight, March 16, 2014 9:41 AM

In It's Just Commerce we write about the new "set point" that's emerging in business. As this article states, "Just beneath the surface of traditional media attention, something vital has been gathering force and is about to explode into public consciousness."

Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Totnes: the town that declared war on global capitalism

Totnes: the town that declared war on global capitalism | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Welcome, then, to another chapter in the ongoing battle between places that pride themselves on their local character, and the great stomping boot of multinational capitalism. That it is happening in Totnes (population: 7,500) is hardly surprising: long renowned as a byword for sustainable living and imaginative local politics, it also the home of the Transition Towns movement, focused not just on the way that people and places use fossil fuels, but how to make local economies more resilient by encouraging independent business, and fighting the kind of big interests that tend to take out more than they put in. Their most famous innovation is the Totnes Pound, a home-grown currency that is accepted by more than 70 local businesses.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from The Next Edge
Scoop.it!

Fourth Sector | Imagine Rural Development Initiative

Fourth Sector | Imagine Rural Development Initiative | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Something’s definitely going on, because over the past ten years the boundaries between what is public (district, state, national), what is private (companies), and what belongs to voluntary organisations (non-profit) have become less and less distinct. Parallel to which the contours of an entirely new social arena have started to emerge – which Europe has been the first to dub the “for-benefit ” or “fourth” sector.

 

A sector populated by organisations, institutions and companies that are characterised by being self-financing – i.e. they operate on the free market – but who, on top of the bottom line, want to be measured and judged on the level of their social, ethical and environmental sense of responsibility.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Community Sufficiency Technologies

In the market we have a feed back loop that rewards efficiency of scale . . . bigger is better . . . and simpler is better. We can balance that with local systems of production, owned by the consumers of what they produce, because that creates a feed back loop that rewards efficiencies of integration . . .

 

Imagine a system of gardens and greenhouses that produced enough food for the entire neighborhood (Neighborhoods already own much of what is required). Imagine that anyone in the neighborhood could get a share of that food by doing what they enjoy . . . fixing cars, reading to kids, cooking, sewing, carpentry, home repair, gardening, making cheese . . .

 

Once you start an integrated system of production, it gets better the more things you can integrate . . . and, instead of labor being a cost, in this system, the more people that contribute, the less each person has to do.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

China urban slum strategy

China urban slum strategy | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

BEIJING .... it was difficult for the Chinese government to take effective measures, but gradually they came up with a plan to improve the living conditions of these scattered people. The people they are dealing with had no jobs in their hometowns and were forced to migrate to the city for work. So, about 500 public housing multi-storey units were built using strong used materials and hard recycled materials and handed over to these homeless people.

 

The Chinese government has facilitated access to services to these people, which is run by a voucher system. They have their own educational facilities situated inside the area, where students from various universities and colleges come to visit these slums 5 days a week to teach students in the slums. Other institutions provide skilled mentors to give vocational training and teach labour skills to the people in the slums. The Government pays a substantial amount of money and gives a certificate of achievement to these students and trainers, so that they are encouraged to do this educational volunteer work.

 

Solar panels are installed to these households to manage power source. The government did not provide any power connection from a direct supply source. The community has a well managed food market and grocery shops and other small businesses. Community guards are made from among their own people to ensure their security and safety. Health and medical surveys are conducted every month to check the medical conditions and health needs of these people. More often it is seen that, various diseases and sickness spread in the communities and the government thoroughly monitors these matters and provide medical services.

 

Government officials monitor these areas carefully to report to higher level authorities for actions and policies to promote. The thing that interested me the most is that these people are given training about microfinance and micro insurance concepts, and then banks give them loans with small amount of interest, and also give interest to households for savings. Volunteers from both public and private banks visit this area to teach people about business, savings and management concept.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Symbiotic urban farming and industrial reuse in Chicago

Symbiotic urban farming and industrial reuse in Chicago | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
The Plant is a closed-loop aquaponic food production system and a hub for artisanal food businesses - all with net-zero energy consumption.

 

John Edel is transforming a former industrial facility in Chicago’s historic Union Stockyard into a unique centre that is part vertical farm, part food-business incubator, part research and education space.

 

“Vertical food production makes a lot of sense,” says Edel, “as you’re moving the food production to the place where it’s consumed — in the city.”

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from The Next Edge
Scoop.it!

A New Fundraising Tool for Permaculture Permaculture Research Institute

A New Fundraising Tool for Permaculture Permaculture Research Institute | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

WeTheTrees provides a multifaceted tool to every permaculturalist, and can be used very creatively to not only raise funds for a project, but also to fundraise for a course, assess the market potential of different ideas, and even to pre-sell products that will be produced with aforementioned fundraised capital, allowing the farmer or eco-social entrepreneur to feel more secure in their undertaking.

 

WeTheTrees can also function as an excellent way for a community to collect money for cooperative endeavors.

 

And furthermore, WeTheTrees allows a wonderful and meaningful way for anyone to be able to contribute to positive change on this planet. Just browsing through the site can be enjoyable, seeing all the interesting projects that other folks are raising money for, and when a person sees one that really excited them, its just a click away to become a contributor.

 

http://www.wethetrees.com/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Cooperatives as Business Models of the Future

Cooperatives as Business Models of the Future | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Cooperatives as Business Models of the Future - When the International Year of Cooperatives (IYC) concluded last week, some of the overwhelming success stories highlighted at a two-day interactive session came both from developing and developed countries,...

Dame Pauline Green, president of the International Cooperative Alliance...

In Brazil, Green said, a clearly defined government policy aimed at helping rural people, through cooperative businesses, has seen a massive reduction in poverty in the rural areas of the sprawling South American nation.

In Kenya, cooperatives account for nearly half of the country’s gross domestic product (GDP), while in Rwanda the cooperative economy has gone from zero to eight percent of GDP over the last 10 years.

The world’s largest 300 cooperatives, primarily in the insurance and food and agriculture sectors, generated revenues of 1.6 trillion dollars and employed nearly 100 million people worldwide.

 

Asked if the cooperative model of enterprise may well be one of the answers to the global economic crisis, Green told IPS, “Without doubt the cooperative business model offers a proven solution to this global economic crisis we are mired in.”

In the UK, she said, schools have become one of the fastest-growing parts of the cooperative economy.


“Renewable energy cooperatives have been springing up all over the globe, and of course media is another area which benefits from the cooperative model because it ensures independent journalism remains viable,” she noted.

 

ddrrnt's insight:

https://twitter.com/toughLoveforx/status/356034145530556418

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Why We Should Worry About the Drop in Immigrant-Led Start-Ups

Why We Should Worry About the Drop in Immigrant-Led Start-Ups | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

New visa requirements are pushing American-trained foreigners to start their businesses in other countries.


In the late 1990s, there had been a big surge in skilled immigration due to a temporary increase in the cap for H-1B visas. In theory, that should have resulted in an explosion in new immigrant founded companies over the past several years.


The latest survey results from AnnaLee Saxenian of the University of California – Then and Now: America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs — shows a drop in the number of immigrant-found companies in Silicon Valley, from 52.4 percent from 1995 to 2005 to 43.9 percent from 2006 to 2012.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Street Food Is Not A Crime | Laws That Shaped LA

Street Food Is Not A Crime  | Laws That Shaped LA | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

...most of the street food sold in Los Angeles is done so in violation of the law.


"It's illegal in two forms," Mark Vallianatos says of many of the items sold from carts, grills and stands. Food trucks operate under different regulations which will be addressed in a future Laws That Shaped L.A. column.


Vallianatos is an author, Occidental College adjunct professor and policy director at Oxy's Urban & Environmental Policy Institute (UEPI). He's nominated the Retail Food Code as a Law That Shaped L.A.
'
"It's illegal under the California Retail Food Code. And also in Los Angeles, it's illegal to sell food on the sidewalk," Vallianatos says, citing Los Angeles Municipal Code Section 42(b).


"But," he continues, "[selling street food is] also ubiquitous, helps define the city and is really an essential part of Los Angeles culture and the food scene in local neighborhoods." (...)


"The issue," Vallianatos says, "is making sure there's a balance between enforcement and creating a good system for vendors so they feel like they have a legitimate reason to become legal and can actually sell and make money and operate and [dealing] with these health code issues so making sure that no one can do it without a $200,000 food truck."




more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from The Big Picture
Scoop.it!

The Social Responsibility of Business is Natural Resource Protection

The Social Responsibility of Business is Natural Resource Protection | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Business today has a responsibility towards society and the environment - it cannot keep endlessly extracting resources without burning itself out.


Today business has a responsibility towards its stakeholders – customers and society at large are more aware of the negative impacts of business as usual. They want cleaner and more ethical products and services. Business today also has a responsibility towards the environment – it cannot keep endlessly extracting resources without consequence.


Resources like air, water, biodiversity, fossil fuels are the very building blocks upon which a successful business is built. With the rapid depletion of these essentials, business needs to learn to deal with the ominous constraint of environmental degradation. Even big business today needs to adapt towards a social entrepreneurship model in order to survive.



Via Flora Moon, David Hodgson
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from The Big Picture
Scoop.it!

Economic Democracy - The Bronx Cooperative Development Initiative

Economic Democracy - The Bronx Cooperative Development Initiative | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Supported by the MIT CoLab - The Bronx Cooperative Development Initiative (BCDI) is an effort to harness local assets and drive a comprehensive regional economic development strategy that is focused on building wealth, ownership, and business leadership among low and moderate-income residents of the Bronx while fostering an environmentally just and sustainable regional economy.


The aim of the BCDI is to pursue a comprehensive development model, focusing on building wealth broadly, increasing the influence local residents and leaders have in the economy, and building the institutional relationships in the Bronx necessary to bring this bottom up approach of economic development to scale.


Via David Hodgson
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Mixed-use neighborhoods reduce some violent crimes, study says

Mixed-use neighborhoods reduce some violent crimes, study says | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

ScienceDaily (Sep. 21, 2010) — Mixed-use neighborhoods that combine residential and business development may help lead to lower levels of some types of violent crime, a new study suggests.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Edmonton designer's most important job is role model

Edmonton designer's most important job is role model | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

EDMONTON - In his two-storey print shop in west Edmonton, Jules Thomas works two phones, juggles two businesses and contemplates the two lives he’s already lived at age 30.

 

A self-taught designer and musician, Thomas is the creative talent in a small, two-person design firm, Distrikt Media. He’s also the brains behind his second venture, Bannock Burger, a mobile restaurant, launched this summer.

 

As part of a younger generation of aboriginals trying their hand at business in the big city, Thomas is an optimist these days: “I just want to be a better me and now I’m a role model for young aboriginals in the city.”

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from Yellow Boat Social Entrepreneurism
Scoop.it!

Pedal-Powered Green Force Juices!

Pedal-Powered Green Juice bar serves all those around Boston.

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/550167339/pedal-powered-green-force-juices

Pedal-Powered Green Juice bar serves all those around Boston. Locally farmed wheatgrass, sprouts, etc

  Launched: Apr 30, 2012 Funding ended: Jun 5, 2012 Remind Me

Well it all starts from a tiny seed…

 

Wheatgrass. Did you know that 2oz of fresh wheatgrass juice is equivalent to the nutritional value of roughly 4lbs of organic green vegetables in vitamin and mineral content. Wheatgrass travels into the blood in about 20 minutes, causing you to be awake and alert for the entire day. No 3 pm crash and coffee run!  Well that's it, that's all I have to say!! Wait, do you want to try some?  What if on the way to work/school in the morning instead of grabbing a coffee, drink a 1oz shot of wheatgrass and see the difference. Green Force Juices is not just juicing wheatgrass, it is producing life force energy, powering like the sun! Wheatgrass is oxygen and hydrogen, as essential to the body as water.

Green Force Juices will be a pedal powered mobile juice bar practicing sustainable methods of offering healthy drinks to the Boston area. Green Force Juices will live by the idea of ‘mobile nature’, visiting schools, office buildings, and local parks. Green Force Juice Bar will be a "zero-waste" operation. Everything that is produced by Green Force Juices will be collected on board and then brought to Metro Pedal Power’s compost and recycling center.  Green Force Juices does not green wash and use terms that is does not stand for.  It’s mobility, compostability, sustainability and drinkability are just some of it’s values. It's more then just being organic, local and fair trade. There is no waste in nature and there is no waste on board. Green as in the true color of wheatgrass and force as in the life force and high frequency of living plant based superfoods.

Lets jump start the Juice revolution together!

Have a sneak peak at the menu below. 

Ultimate Green drink: celery, cucumber, sunflower sprouts

Size: 12oz


Via Rick Passo
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from The Next Edge
Scoop.it!

Sharing lessons on inclusive business - The Practitioner Hub - Business Fights Poverty

Sharing lessons on inclusive business - The Practitioner Hub - Business Fights Poverty | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

“Sharing knowledge is not about giving people something, or getting something from them. That is only valid for information sharing. Sharing knowledge occurs when people are genuinely interested in helping one another develop new capacities for action; it is about creating learning processes.”


Peter Senge, Center for Organizational Learning, MIT Sloan School of Management

 

Collaborating, innovating, asking hard questions and learning from others....are all vital ingredients for successful inclusive business. Every inclusive business project is unique but many of the opportunities, risks and challenges it faces are not. And every project, whether it succeeds or not, will provide a wealth of understanding that can be used to inform and improve future ventures.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Why It Matters Who Owns Local Businesses | Jonathan Rowe

As Jane Jacobs pointed out in her seminal Death and Life of Great American Cities, a street with many small shops has many watchful eyes. This is especially so if the shops are run by individual owners who take a personal interest in the surroundings. The pedestrian traffic alone— the constant coming and going— provides potential witnesses and thus a deterrent to crime.


Compare that to a block with a K-Mart or Barnes and Noble. There will be long stretches with no entryways, and no watchful eyes from inside. Such blocks are especially creepy at night.


In a nation with a surfeit of stuff but mounting social deficits, there is an element of insanity in designing and assessing the economy solely in terms of financial transactions, as economists do (via the GDP, for example.) Dr. Thomas Lyson of Cornell University has compared counties with small, locally owned businesses and social institutions against those in which outside corporations dominate.


As recounted by Stacey Mitchell in her book Big Box Swindle, Lyson found that:


“[T]he big-business counties had greater income inequality, lower housing standards, more low-birth-weight babies (an indicator of overall health); more worker disability, lower educational outcomes, and higher crime rates. The small-business counties not only scored better on all of these social welfare measures, but their residents belonged to more civic organizations and voted more often.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Seattle Sustainable Urban Farming Startup Keeps it ‘Hyperlocal’, Growing Food on Rooftops

Seattle Sustainable Urban Farming Startup Keeps it ‘Hyperlocal’, Growing Food on Rooftops | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Chris Bajuk got into urban farming almost by chance. Though not from a farming background, he has been gardening in backyards since childhood. And, in recent years he has been experimenting with hydroponic systems. “A good friend of mine, and classmate from the University of Washington MBA program, came over to my house and was awestruck by how much produce I was growing on my backyard deck using hydroponics,” says Bajuk, who was growing peas, beans, tomatillos, peppers, cucumbers, zucchini, watermelon and corn in buckets. “He suggested we start an urban farming business,” he reflects. “Thus, UrbanHarvest was born.”

 

http://urbanharvest.com/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

The Quiet Revolution in Social Impact

The Quiet Revolution in Social Impact | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

There are currently 30 million African migrants who have left their home countries to find work elsewhere. They support more than 300 million people in their home countries, remitting essential food and goods, and in aggregate represent more than $10b in annual economic activity. This is an economy without an infrastructure, however, relying on informal channels and bribes to function.

 

South African entrepreneur Suzana Moreira is working to change that. Her startup moWoza uses SMS to help African migrants order, pay for, and select a place for parcel pickup. Instead of having to actually ship a bag of maize, for example, they can simply order one near the person they’re buying it for.

more...
No comment yet.