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being an immigrant or living in a "slum" is a feature not a bug
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Cooperatives as Business Models of the Future

Cooperatives as Business Models of the Future | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Cooperatives as Business Models of the Future - When the International Year of Cooperatives (IYC) concluded last week, some of the overwhelming success stories highlighted at a two-day interactive session came both from developing and developed countries,...

Dame Pauline Green, president of the International Cooperative Alliance...

In Brazil, Green said, a clearly defined government policy aimed at helping rural people, through cooperative businesses, has seen a massive reduction in poverty in the rural areas of the sprawling South American nation.

In Kenya, cooperatives account for nearly half of the country’s gross domestic product (GDP), while in Rwanda the cooperative economy has gone from zero to eight percent of GDP over the last 10 years.

The world’s largest 300 cooperatives, primarily in the insurance and food and agriculture sectors, generated revenues of 1.6 trillion dollars and employed nearly 100 million people worldwide.

 

Asked if the cooperative model of enterprise may well be one of the answers to the global economic crisis, Green told IPS, “Without doubt the cooperative business model offers a proven solution to this global economic crisis we are mired in.”

In the UK, she said, schools have become one of the fastest-growing parts of the cooperative economy.


“Renewable energy cooperatives have been springing up all over the globe, and of course media is another area which benefits from the cooperative model because it ensures independent journalism remains viable,” she noted.

 

ddrrnt's insight:

https://twitter.com/toughLoveforx/status/356034145530556418

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A Visit to an Integrated Urban Plan for the City of Manaus, Brazil | PPIAF

A Visit to an Integrated Urban Plan for the City of Manaus, Brazil | PPIAF | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Since 1970, the population of Manaus grew from 300,000 to over 2 million inhabitants.  Many of those who arrived, lacking a place to live, squatted on empty lots and built palafitas—wooden shacks that sit on stilts. 


By 2003 the city of Manaus faced important urban challenges as a result of rapid population growth, unplanned city growth, and a lack of investment in sanitation infrastructure. 


The government of the State of Amazonas, of which Manaus is the capital, decided to take action to improve the living conditions of the inhabitants of the igarapés and bring back the splendor of the city of Manaus.  The government began preparing an Integrated Urban Plan for the city that included engineering, environment, urbanization, housing, social, and institutional action. 

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https://twitter.com/toughLoveforx/status/344163348990021632

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Brazil To Grow Even More Biofuel, From All The Biofuel It Already Has

Brazil To Grow Even More Biofuel, From All The Biofuel It Already Has | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Today, much of the fuel that powers Brazil’s cars and trucks is grown as sugarcane. Now, the country is brewing a second source in tanks of algae. The world’s first industrial-scale biofuel plant, using waste from making their already popular biofuel (ethanol) to feed the production of another (algae), is scheduled to open in Brazil in 2013.

 

Brazil’s biofuel sector is the second largest in the world, following the U.S.. But there’s a major difference. In North America, most ethanol comes from corn and $6 billion in federal subsidies lavished on the sector each year. Brazil, rich with fertile soil and tropical sunlight, can grow more fuel for less money, and undercut the price of conventional oil in some cases. The country is poised to rapidly expand its production globally, and provide a credible competitor to fossil fuels.

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Project brings development to Rio de Janeiro’s slums

Project brings development to Rio de Janeiro’s slums | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
With financing from the IDB, the Favela-Bairro project has helped more than 100 communities.

 

also see:

http://web.mit.edu/urbanupgrading/upgrading/case-examples/ce-BL-fav.html

 

"The Inter-American Development Bank funded this US$180 million “slum to neighborhood” project in 1995 in which it sought to integrate existing favelas into the fabric of the city through infrastructure upgrading and service increases. The project involves 253,000 residents in 73 communities. Key to the success of this large project was a committed and flexible city government and the use of intra- and extra-institutional partnerships with NGOs, the private sector, churches, and the general population. Especially instrumental was the use of grass-roots level infrastructure upgrading experts as project managers who could work easily with both the government and with the community members."

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In Brazil, A Sustainable City Sector Under Development | Earthtechling

In Brazil, A Sustainable City Sector Under Development | Earthtechling | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
The northwest sector of Brasília mandates the use of solar power, solar thermal, and natural gas -- and picks up residential recycling via vacuum tubes.
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Sustainability Sprouts Through Slum on Brazilian Hillside

Sustainability Sprouts Through Slum on Brazilian Hillside | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

This article describes the transformation of Rio de Janeiro's slums, known as favelas.  About 22 percent of the city's residents, or 1.4 million people, live in favelas. The city’s “Morar Carioca” program intends to bring them basic services such as paved roads, electricity and covered sewers.  Using sustainable materials and construction methods, the goal is to “urbanize” every favela in Rio, totaling 280,000 households, bringing roads, sewers and power by 2020.

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