Arrival Cities
8.6K views | +0 today
Follow
Arrival Cities
being an immigrant or living in a "slum" is a feature not a bug
Curated by ddrrnt
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

The environment is the space in which we live, work, and play.

I tend to employ a definition more often used by those in the environmental justice movement–that the environment is the space in which we live, work, and play. It includes our parks and schools,  shops and workplaces, our homes and backyards.  Environmentalism includes the health effects of children living by freeways, the planning of a new sub-division in a city, the vegetables grown in the yard of a rural or urban home. Without understanding our environment as something in which we are a part, the chasm between “people” and “place,” “society” and “environment,” will continue to loom large.

 

I would like to argue that such a dichotomy is not, and must not be true; and that privileging the land over people, or vice versa, is not a “sustainable” behaviour. Yet all too often, it appears that one side of the equation is left out, depending on what sphere of influence one happens to travel within.  Social justice is often a forgotten cast-off in the environmental sphere, while environmental impacts become minimized by those privileging a social lens. Each side believes they are justified.

 

By: Darlene Seto
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

For a truly sustainable world, we need zero waste cities

For a truly sustainable world, we need zero waste cities | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Choosing sustainable building materials and systems goes beyond considering durability. We need to take life cycle analysis and supply chain into account, and specify the most appropriate materials for a project – the least polluting, most easily recyclable, most energy efficient (least embodied energy) – and from sustainable sources. (...)


The zero waste ethos is a big call, radical in its ramifications, and it requires more than a top-down, government-imposed approach. To be successful, zero waste needs to be embraced and implemented by citizens and community groups, business and industry.

It is already technologically possible to build a zero-waste and zero-carbon-emission city.


The question is – are we willing to do so and transform from consumers to citizens?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from 21st Century Parenting
Scoop.it!

Do Early Experiences in the Natural World Help Shape Children’s Brain Architecture?

Do Early Experiences in the Natural World Help Shape Children’s Brain Architecture? | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

A growing body of primarily correlative evidence suggests that, even in the densest urban neighborhoods, negative stress, obesity and other health problems are reduced and psychological and physical health improved when children and adults experience more nature in their everyday lives. These studies suggest that nearby nature can also stimulate learning abilities and reduce the symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and we know that therapies using gardening or animal companions do improve psychological health. We also know that parks with the richest biodiversity appear to have a positive impact on psychological well-being and social bonding among humans.


Via David Hodgson
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from Health and Fitness
Scoop.it!

Parks Are Part of Our Healthcare System

Parks Are Part of Our Healthcare System | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

“Parks are a part of our healthcare system,” said Dr. Daphne Miller, a professor of family and community medicine, University of California, San Francisco, at the Greater & Greener: Reimagining Parks for 21st Century Cities, a conference in New York City. She said these green spaces are crucial to solving hypertension, anxiety, depression, diabetes — “the diseases of indoor living.” The more someone spends outdoors, the less likely they are to suffer from mental or physical disorders. But she said parks officials and the medical profession still needs more data to take aim at the many “naysayers on the other side” who don’t believe in what every landscape architect values.


Via nancercize, Kirk Fontaine
more...
Kirk Fontaine's comment, August 25, 2012 10:08 PM
thanks nancericize More attention and funds should be focused on the outdoor resources that are healthy as well cheap - it is a no-brainer
Rescooped by ddrrnt from Digital Footprint
Scoop.it!

"The Quantified Community" by Esther Dyson | Project Syndicate

"The Quantified Community" by Esther Dyson | Project Syndicate | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
Just as monitoring devices and software enable people to measure and improve their own health and behavior, communities can quantify their performance by collecting and analyzing untapped data.

 

In the same way, I predict (and am trying to foster) the emergence of a Quantified Community movement, with communities measuring the state, health, and activities of their people and institutions, thereby improving them. Just consider: each town has its own schools, library, police, roads and bridges, businesses, and, of course, people. All of them potentially generate a lot of data, most of it uncollected and unanalyzed. That is about to change.

 

A news company could encourage contests within neighborhoods or with other communities to become healthier, fix more potholes, reduce the rate of traffic accidents, or curb drunk driving. Just as competition with other individuals is part of the Quantified Self movement, so competition with other communities will be part of the Quantified Community movement.


Via Peter Vander Auwera
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from The Next Edge
Scoop.it!

We’re All Climate-Change Idiots

We’re All Climate-Change Idiots | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

CLIMATE CHANGE is staring us in the face. The science is clear, and the need to reduce planet-warming emissions has grown urgent. So why, collectively, are we doing so little about it?

 

Yes, there are political and economic barriers, as well as some strong ideological opposition, to going green. But researchers in the burgeoning field of climate psychology have identified another obstacle, one rooted in the very ways our brains work.  ... 

 

We have trouble imagining a future drastically different from the present. We block out complex problems that lack simple solutions.

 

... energy monitors that displayed consumption levels in real-time cut energy use by an average of 7 percent, according to a study in the journal Energy in 2010. Telling heavy energy users how much less power their neighbors consumed prompted them to cut their own use, according to a 2007 study in Psychological Science. And trading on our innate laziness, default settings have also conserved resources: when Rutgers University changed its printers’ settings to double-sided, it saved more than seven million sheets of paper in one semester in 2007.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Where the heart is: Writers invite us into their idea of home

Where the heart is: Writers invite us into their idea of home | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Our homes do not have to offer us permanent occupancy or store our clothes to merit the name. Home can be an airport or a library, a garden or a hotel. Our love of home is in turn an acknowledgement of the degree to which our identity is not self-determined. We need a home in the psychological sense as much as we need one in the physical: to compensate for a vulnerability. We need a refuge to shore up our states of mind, because so much of the world is opposed to our allegiances. We need our rooms to align us to desirable versions of ourselves and to keep alive the important, evanescent sides of us.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Shareable: Adding Whimsy to Public Spaces Creates Collective Experiences

Shareable: Adding Whimsy to Public Spaces Creates Collective Experiences | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

... in a bid to improve public health by encouraging more people to use the stairs instead of the escalator, The Fun Theory (a Volkswagen initiative) transformed a set of Stockholm subway stairs into piano keys — each step a person took played a note. As a result, 66 percent more people took the stairs than the escalator.


By Kelly McCartney

17 Dec 2012


ddrrnt's insight:

Visit Sharable to read more examples of how public spaces can generate fun, community, and shared experiences among a city's citizens.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Empathy, Education, and Musical Chairs: brains are actually primed for both competition and cooperation

Empathy, Education, and Musical Chairs: brains are actually primed for both competition and cooperation | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

...As it turns out, however, recent scientific advancements in the field of neuroscience are showing that actually, these parents--and everyone else who believes that people are only inherently competitive--are wrong. Instead, human brains are actually primed for both competition and cooperation: which side of us emerges as more dominant is dependent on our culture....

 

But of course, right now, our culture does not nurture empathy and cooperation. Instead, in schools, our homes, in the media, and in every aspect of our lives, we value competition...

 

Multiple fields of scientific research, including neuroscience, primatology, evolutionary biology, cognitive ethology (the study of animal behavior in naturalistic settings), social psychology, and subfields in philosophy have produced enough evidence over the past two decades to confirm that our greatest hope for the future rests in understanding the real possibilities of human biology, and beginning to translate these findings into our culture (de Waal, 2009).

 

by Nadine Dolby

img via wikipedia


 


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from Empathy and Compassion
Scoop.it!

Witnessing Acts of Compassion Prompts People to Do Good: Study | Epoch Times

Witnessing Acts of Compassion Prompts People to Do Good: Study | Epoch Times | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

In a new study published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Karl Aquino and his team found that after witnessing exceptional altruistic acts, people are more likely to perform charitably themselves.


“They have some sort of emotional reaction—they’re inspired, they feel somewhat awed by the behavior, they may get severe physiological reactions. A lot of these changes can then lead them to try to do good things for others.”


“A lot of the media, when they try to get people to do good, they focus on highlighting the suffering others are experiencing or terrible things people are experiencing,” he says.


“So we suggest an alternative technique may be to highlight examples of extraordinary goodness. They’re rare by definition; they don’t happen every day. But if we could identify these and make them much more prominent, then it could get people to think differently about their lives and about others, which may influence them to do good.”


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from The Big Picture
Scoop.it!

Gamification, civic rewards and crowd sourcing strategies for connected and savvy cities

Gamification, civic rewards and crowd sourcing strategies for connected and savvy cities | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Cities are the ground zero for digital innovation. The urbanization of the world now takes place in the digital era, where connectivity is a core feature of urban functions. Smart Cities are supposed to be networked cities where ICTs are a vehicle for community intelligence, for sustainable ecologic and social growth, as well as participatory actions and civic engagement. Technologies must be adaptable to urban environments, and the city must be hackable, changeable and suitable for digital/real participation, loosing –in quite reasonable terms – the the top-down schemes for urban planning and city management.


Via Beatrice Benne, David Hodgson
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

What Makes a Successful Place? | Project for Public Spaces

What Makes a Successful Place? | Project for Public Spaces | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Great public spaces are where celebrations are held, social and economic exchanges take place, friends run into each other, and cultures mix. They are the “front porches” of our public institutions – libraries, field houses, neighborhood schools – where we interact with each other and government. When the spaces work well, they serve as a stage for our public lives.

 

[ Dan notes: This post provides questions and criteria for evaluating if a public space is likely to succeed or fail. ]

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Gawad Kalinga | Inhabitat

Gawad Kalinga | Inhabitat | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

In the face of mass hyperurbanization, where do we even start to make a shift: fair labor practice, cleaning up the environment, more affordable housing? How can disaster response serve as a catalyst for bringing forth greater infrastructural change?


One organization based in the Philippines may just have a big part of the answer, and is certainly no stranger to disaster recovery. Gawad Kalinga is quickly becoming an international NGO that originally began as a local movement in the Philippines, aimed at eradicating poverty by building villages and communities with squatters all over the country. Started in 2000, several projects have already established together over 15,000 homes in more than 600 villages.


Gawad Kalinga, which means “to give care,” relies on strengthening communal infrastructure that not only includes site development, but education and health facilities, livelihood and community empowerment but, essentially, an economic engine for people and not just raw shelter. The homes are built on sweat equity and skills training, and the organization even provides start-up capital for micro-enterprises and the marketing of community-based products.


Founder Tony Meloto says, “If you want to bring the country out of poverty, give the poorest of the poor a middle class environment so they have middle class aspirations. [...] The problem of poverty is not economic, it is behavioral.”


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Why the Places We Live Make Us Happy

Why the Places We Live Make Us Happy | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

In an article titled "Understanding the Pursuit of Happiness in Ten Major Cities," the authors concluded that good urbanism contributes positively to happiness:

 

"We find that the design and conditions of cities are associated with the happiness of residents in 10 urban areas. Cities that provide easy access to convenient public transportation and to cultural and leisure amenities promote happiness. Cities that are affordable and serve as good places to raise children also have happier residents. We suggest that such places foster the types of social connections that can improve happiness and ultimately enhance the attractiveness of living in the city."

more...
Mariana Soffer's comment, June 25, 2012 7:01 AM
I really like your work dd, it's great