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being an immigrant or living in a "slum" is a feature not a bug
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These Tomatoes Are Helping to Improve the Environment

These Tomatoes Are Helping to Improve the Environment | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

California tomato grower Casey Houweling is the first American to install a combined heat and power generation plant that will make his 150-acre greenhouse almost completely energy-efficient. The plant will use natural gas to keep the greenhouse warm, and the extra electricity it generates will be sold into the local power grid. Most notably, it will feed carbon dioxide gas, a waste product, directly into the greenhouse. The use of this gas helps increase plant growth and improve the tomatoes' flavor.

 

via IdeaFeed | Big Think

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In Brazil, A Sustainable City Sector Under Development | Earthtechling

In Brazil, A Sustainable City Sector Under Development | Earthtechling | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it
The northwest sector of Brasília mandates the use of solar power, solar thermal, and natural gas -- and picks up residential recycling via vacuum tubes.
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How solar power can help the billion people without electricity

How solar power can help the billion people without electricity | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

One of the major opportunities lies in providing energy access for the more than 1.2 billion people who don't have electricity, most of whom, in business-as-usual scenarios, still won't have it in 2030. These are the poorest people on the planet. Ironically, the world's poorest can best afford the most sophisticated lighting — off-grid combinations of solar panels, power electronics, and LED lights. And this creates an opportunity for which the economics are compelling, the moral urgency profound, the development benefits enormous, and the potential leverage game changing.

 

The cost of coal and copper — the ingredients of conventional grid power — are soaring. Meanwhile, the cost of solar panels and LEDs, the ingredients of distributed renewable power, are racing down even faster.

 

If we want the poor to benefit from electricity we cannot wait for the grid, and we cannot rely on fossil fuels. The International Energy Agency, historically a grid-centric, establishment voice, admits that half of those without electricity today will never be wired. The government of India estimates that two-thirds of its non-electrified households need distributed power.

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SolarKiosk | Simple Community Ethiopia

SolarKiosk | Simple Community Ethiopia | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

SolarKiosk, a modular business unit for Africa and off-grid areas anywhere in the world, recently opened its first kiosk near Lake Langano, Ethiopia. Following a period of design and planning, a privately financed company was formed to prepare the product for serial production by building prototypes and running pilots in several countries. The first prototype of the SolarKiosk was built in November 2011 and displayed in various locations, including the 2012 TedXBerlin conference. In March of this year, a subsidiary, Solarkiosk Solutions PLC, was incorporated in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, to run a pilot program. Construction of the first prototypes in Ethiopia began in April. Today, the kiosk is up and running in a new community.

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Africa: Deciphering a Green Economy

Africa: Deciphering a Green Economy | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

The "development first" approach to the green economy has been pushed by the African Union, said eminent African scientist Youba Sokona, the co-chair of the IPCC's Working Group III (mitigation issues). In a paper prepared by him as the coordinator of the African Climate Policy Centre, Sokona described this approach as an "opportunity to transform climate challenges into development opportunities ... to modernize and upgrade their water, energy, urbanization plans and agricultural systems."

 

He said countries in the region had adopted the concepts of a "green economy" and "green growth", which did not "originate in Africa", but that these concepts "needed to be re-articulated to have real meaning in the African condition, and the entry point for us is that it has to reduce poverty and make us climate resilient."

 

Sokona called for "leapfrogging" directly to cleaner technologies and sustainable land-use solutions, but said these should be home-grown, built by an African pool of researchers and industry that needed to be nurtured. Importing technology to produce renewable energy could be prohibitively expensive.

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