Arrival Cities
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Arrival Cities
being an immigrant or living in a "slum" is a feature not a bug
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Indigenous and ingenious: The roots of mobile banking in Africa | Build it Kenny, and they will come...

Indigenous and ingenious: The roots of mobile banking in Africa | Build it Kenny, and they will come... | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

In Ghana, it’s popularly known as susu. In Cameroon, tontines or chilembe. And in South Africa, stokfel. Today, you’d most likely call it plain-old microfinance, the nearest term we have for it. Age-old indigenous credit schemes have run perfectly well without much outside intervention for generations. Although, in our excitement to implement new technologies and solutions, we sometimes fail to recognise them. Innovations such as mobile banking – great as they may be – are hailed as revolutionary without much consideration for what may have come before, or who the original innovators may have been.


Via Thabo Mophiring
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The Rise of the New Economy Movement

The Rise of the New Economy Movement | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

From cooperatives, to employee owned businesses to social responsible companies to complementary currencies... we are birthing!


Via Ferananda
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Peace Overtures's curator insight, March 16, 2014 9:41 AM

In It's Just Commerce we write about the new "set point" that's emerging in business. As this article states, "Just beneath the surface of traditional media attention, something vital has been gathering force and is about to explode into public consciousness."

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About ‘Money and Sustainability’ | Money and Sustainability

About ‘Money and Sustainability’ | Money and Sustainability | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

We tend to assume that we must have a single, monopolistic currency, funded through bank debt, enforced by a central bank. But we don’t need any such thing! In fact, the present system is outdated, brittle and unfit for purpose (witness the eurozone crisis). Like any other monoculture, it’s profitable at first but ultimately a recipe for economic and environmental disaster. The alternative is a monetary ‘ecosystem’, with complementary currencies alongside the conventional one.

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Networked Resilient Communities

Networked Resilient Communities | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Networked Resilient Communities integrate the production of food, energy, and water into the community’s fabric. They smartly leverage the best technologies and methodologies (e.g. permaculture) to maximize the quality, quantity, and availability of essential goods.

 

Networked Resilient Communities aren’t insular. They understand a larger world exists and even if the economy is depressed, they are actively entrepreneurial. They seek new sources of income. However, they don’t do this by courting large businesses. They do this by helping small artisinal businesses and co-ops export goods and services to the larger world. A group of nimble, small businesses like these produce a diverse income stream (where if one goes dry, another takes its place). They also can be flexible on terms (trade, barter, new currencies, etc.) in ways that larger businesses cannot.

 

Networked Resilient Communities build local platforms that make it easier for everyone in the community to produce. From tool libraries to Saturday fix-it sessions to hackerspaces t0 co-working spaces to solar co-ops to community supported agriculture to garden allotments to community currencies. Platforms that make the common things needed for productive tasks easier and less expensive. Platforms that make community building and business formation easier.

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How to Bootstrap an Informal Local Economy

How to Bootstrap an Informal Local Economy | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Today's Resilient Community letter is from Marcus Wynne.  He's been on the road, looking at fiercely independent, rural communities across the US, to divine what makes them tick.

 

There’s been an explosion in the use of community time banks, local currencies, and barter networks all across the US and EU. In some cases, like depression ravaged Spain and Greece, informal local economies are starting to displace the global financial economy.

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What was the need? People need to eat. Some don’t have money or benefits or sufficient self-sustainable resources to provide all they need for themselves. So they trade what do have, or else make or manufacture or provide a service. It’s local in structure, defined essentially by proximity and personal acquaintance with the hub. It provides all of the basic elements of a resilient community: security, food/water, transportation, medical/health, energy.

 

How this differs from “intentional communities” is that this community sprang up out of need. It wasn’t a group of people who decided one day to go and start this; it grew out of need and trust established through meeting needs over a number of years.


Via Elle D'Coda
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Totnes: the town that declared war on global capitalism

Totnes: the town that declared war on global capitalism | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Welcome, then, to another chapter in the ongoing battle between places that pride themselves on their local character, and the great stomping boot of multinational capitalism. That it is happening in Totnes (population: 7,500) is hardly surprising: long renowned as a byword for sustainable living and imaginative local politics, it also the home of the Transition Towns movement, focused not just on the way that people and places use fossil fuels, but how to make local economies more resilient by encouraging independent business, and fighting the kind of big interests that tend to take out more than they put in. Their most famous innovation is the Totnes Pound, a home-grown currency that is accepted by more than 70 local businesses.

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Charles Eisenstein: 'In a gift economy the more you give, the richer you are' - video

Charles Eisenstein: 'In a gift economy the more you give, the richer you are' - video | Arrival Cities | Scoop.it

Theorist and de-growth activist Charles Eisenstein talks about the benefits of a 'gift-based' economy. He argues that such a model aims to bring about a workforce driven by passion rather than coerced by money and profit and he highlights certain co-operative schemes already proving the ideal can be made real

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