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Rugged, Sustainable Architecture at Shoal Bay, New Zealand

Rugged, Sustainable Architecture at Shoal Bay, New Zealand | Arquitectura sostenible | Scoop.it

The owners of this small weekender in Shoal Bay New Zealand wanted a getaway that was rugged, rural in character and felt unpretentious. Architect Gerald Parsonson responded with the design of a beautiful cedar clad bach in the form of two offset pavilions.

 

Architects Statement:

"Shoal Bay is a remote settlement on the rugged east coast of southern Hawkes Bay. The building is designed to be part of the rural setting, raised off the ground and sitting beside the original woolshed, which has served the bay since the early 1900's. The bach is rugged yet welcoming and offers unpretentious shelter, it is the type of place where you kick off your shoes and don't need to worry about walking sand through the house.
The bach is formed of two slightly off-set pavilions, one housing the bedrooms and the other the main living space. Decks are located at each end of the living pavilion allowing the sun to be followed throughout the day. Sliding screens at the north-west end provide adjustable shelter for the different wind conditions, offer privacy from neighbouring campers and act as walls for outside sleeping."


The sustainable, passive design features an interior spatial arrangement oriented for solar gain, shaded in the summer by the sliding shutters, which also provide shelter from the prevailing northwest winds. Also increasing the efficiency are high levels of insulation, along with solar panels that sit between the two pavilions...

 

Visit the link to view more images of this contemporary passive design that responds to its site and rural context...


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Mark Warren's curator insight, December 16, 2012 10:28 AM

The owners of this small weekender in Shoal Bay New Zealand wanted a getaway that was rugged, rural in character and felt unpretentious. Architect Gerald Parsonson responded with the design of a beautiful cedar clad bach in the form of two offset pavilions.

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Low Cost House by Vo Trong Nghia Architects

Low Cost House by Vo Trong Nghia Architects | Arquitectura sostenible | Scoop.it
Vo Trong Nghia Architects address the housing crisis in Vietnam by introducing modular homes that are cheap and easy to assemble.

 

Vietnamese studio Vo Trong Nghia Architects plans to address the housing crisis in Vietnam by introducing modular homes that use cheap local materials and are easy to assemble.

 

Housing areas in the country have been expanding at a rapid pace over the last ten years but according to the architects many families still live in houses that have less than ten square metres in floor area.

 

The architects came up with a concept for a house with a lightweight steel structure, before building full-size prototypes of a house and office with layered walls of corrugated polycarbonate and bamboo.

 

“If we make the house with concrete and bricks, which is the most typical structure in south-east Asia, it can be very dangerous even though the house itself is strong, just because of the soft and weak condition of the ground,” said Iwamoto. “So we decided to design a lightweight structure within a squeezed budget.

 

On the assumption that bathroom and kitchen facilities will be located outside, the buildings are designed as single rooms where living, sleeping and dining areas are divisible through changes in the floor level or by drawing curtains.

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BIO Campus by AllesWirdGut

BIO Campus by AllesWirdGut | Arquitectura sostenible | Scoop.it

AllesWirdGut's urban design for Istanbul channels natural energy for comfort factor

 

"Contrary to common belief, urban systems can be more environmentally sustainable than rural or suburban living. With people and resources located so close to one another it is possible to save energy and resource things such as food, transportation and mass transit systems. Finally, cities benefit the economy by locating human capital in one relatively small geographic area where ideas can be generated."

 

As such, AllesWirdGut, Transsolar and Tom Matton are proposing a self-sufficient and self-supporting community where commerical and retail units, recreational and leisure facilities, and day-to-day amenities are located in close proximity to one another. As part of this strategy, factors such as vegetation, light-reflecting colours and various water features will be brought into play to reduce dependency on air-conditioning.

 

Comfort is key to this new development and the collaboration is aware of the discomfort often experienced by those not used to warm climatic conditions. To enhance the comfort of users, facades which filter sunlight will be used throughout to supply sufficient natural daylight to the interiors, highly efficient air handling systems will be installed, green plants and open spaces will be inserted to improve local microclimate and individual control of personal room climate installed as standard.

 

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Ecobuilding: Cooper Point House by Mickey Muennig

Ecobuilding: Cooper Point House by Mickey Muennig | Arquitectura sostenible | Scoop.it

74-year-old green architect mickey muennig is featured in this month’s wall street journal magazine. muennig was been building green-roof architecture for over 30 years in big sur, california. one of his latest eco-buildings is this one on cooper point, covered in a roof of wild grasses. while he has been a long-time eco-architecture practitioner, muennig remains an unsung hero of the green movement. the cooper point house is built into the landscape and features concrete walls on two side and all-glass walls in between. the green roof above is a continuation of the landscape that feature thick covering which helps make the house more fireproof and provides insulation. the home is ultra-efficient and runs off the grid thanks to a bank of solar panels. inside the home prominently features douglas fir beams that support the home with a large skylight to let in the natural light. the home covers 2,745 sq. feet with its 3 bedrooms. the profile of the home and muennig in this month’s wall street journal magazine is written by alastair gordon with photographs by simon watson.

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Angeles's comment, December 3, 2012 4:19 PM
Nice!!!!!!
archYable's comment, December 3, 2012 5:03 PM
Yes, it´s really interesting! Thanks
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Gervais Fortin | Ecologia Montréal

Gervais Fortin | Ecologia Montréal | Arquitectura sostenible | Scoop.it

Beyond green, healthy home. Ecologia Montréal is the first single dweling home in Montreal aiming for a Platinum LEED certification. The owner, Sabine Karsenti, with the collaboration of the Ecologia Foundation and her designer Gervais Fortin, had the objective to reduce to a minimum her ecological footprint by using healthy, local and little polluting materials. The team demonstrated that it’s possible to build an ecological house without sacrificing the contemporary design. All the materials were hand-picked from the most ecoresponsible supplier’s of Quebec. A combination of exposed beams, big windows and an inner courtyard, signs the beauty of a cozy and modern living space.

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Bay House by Roger Ferris + Partners

Bay House by Roger Ferris + Partners | Arquitectura sostenible | Scoop.it

This residence located on the Long Island coastline is designed to capture and frame spectacular water views. The design also maximizes transparency between interior spaces and the link between interior and exterior. The design embraces sustainability with geothermal design, daylighting, solar shading strategies and xeriscape landscaping.

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Casa El Pangue tiered house by Elton + Léniz

Casa El Pangue tiered house by Elton + Léniz | Arquitectura sostenible | Scoop.it

Panoramic Pacific views can be enjoyed from terraces created by the tiered levels of this hillside house in Chile by architects Elton + Léniz.

 

The house is developed towards a central vertical circulation, connecting the 4 levels and 3 terraces in which the house is organized, in order to get as much of the view of the pacific ocean as possible, taking advantage of the height offered by the natural slop of the site.

 

The constructive system is generated upon sustaining concrete walls that terraces the site in three levels. The fourth level was designed in lightweight structure with wood siding.

 

The living room level appears as a great terrace surrounded by planters which replaces the railings.

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archYable's comment, November 29, 2012 7:31 AM
thanks to you
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A Modular System for Sustainable Housing by Cso Arquitectura

A Modular System for Sustainable Housing by Cso Arquitectura | Arquitectura sostenible | Scoop.it

SAMVS is a system of generation of industrialized open modular housing- the user can adapt it to his or her needs, and the product can be realized in a very short time with a fixed price and with the utilization of all kinds of sustainable systems.

Learn more about this efficient and innovative approach to green building at the link...


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Elisabeth Avalos's curator insight, October 18, 2013 11:55 AM

Vivienda sustentable

 

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Peruri 88 by MVRDV, Jerde and Arup for Jakarta

Peruri 88 by MVRDV, Jerde and Arup for Jakarta | Arquitectura sostenible | Scoop.it

Dutch studio MVRDV is proposing a 400-metre skyscraper for Jakarta that looks like a pile of at least ten separate buildings.

 

MVRDV, alongside American architects Jerde and engineers Arup, designed the 88-storey “vertical city” as a part of developer’s bid for a site in the south-east of Indonesia’s capital.

 

The architects explain that the building would comprise just four staggered towers, which would rise up from a commercial podium at the base. Distributed amongst these structures would be a mix of apartments, hotels and offices, as well as shops, cinemas, a mosque and a vertiginous amphitheatre accessed by outdoor elevators.

 

“Peruri 88 is vertical Jakarta. It represents a new, denser, social, green mini-city, a monument to the development of Jakarta as a modern icon literally raised from its own city fabric,” said MVRDV co-founder Winy Maas.

 

Gardens, swimming pools and terraces would cover the tiered rooftops, which the architects conceive as a jungle filled with local trees and plants. ”Our inspiration for the commercial podium and public spaces was Java’s natural setting; lush jungle and stone surrounded by expansive ocean,” said David Rogers, design director at Jerde.

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Victims of the City

Victims of the City | Arquitectura sostenible | Scoop.it

In this TED video Mark Raymond shares his views on the current culture of city-making worldwide. He explains how design can and should infiltrate in society to cause social change, but in some cases this change is negative. Raymond quotes Aldo Rossi with his famous quote: “architecture is the making of the city at the time”, which defines the individualism and collectivism in each building, its relation with the dynamic changing process of the city, and the force of imagination in city-making.

 

Raymond mentions several phenomenons in most of today’s cities:
1. The predominance of typologies: high-rises, retail, high-ways, and suburban developments – all typologies not independent projects.
2. The diminishing of the integrity and the capacity of the city to allow social interaction – public places not designed for the public
3. loss of equity although most infrastructure is paid publicly – places designed for classes

In conclusion, Raymond explains that design and city planning should view society is an inclusive community to promote a more sustainable future. He shows Barcelona and Bogota as leaders in this changes – investing in public spaces rather than highways.

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JORN UTZON

Jorn Utzon es uno de los arquitectos contemporáneos más reconocidos. Su obra más emblemática, la Ópera de Sydney, en Australia, es hoy Patrimonio de la Humanidad. Para este danés, la arquitectura es un arte que no sólo satisface nuestras necesidades de hábitat, sino que forma parte de nuestro paisaje estético más cotidiano, capaz de sorprendernos y emocionarnos. En 2003, Utzon recibió el Premio Pritzker, considerado el Nobel de la Arquitectura. A sus 89 años, Utzon reside en Mallorca, convirtiendo sus casas en un lugar de peregrinación para arquitectos. La Universidad Internacional de Andalucía, en su sede de la Cartuja, en Sevilla, ha organizado un congreso internacional bajo el título "Maestros de la Arquitectura Contemporánea, Jorn Utzon", para analizar la obra de este librepensador de la Arquitectura.

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Angeles's comment, November 11, 2012 6:53 AM
Fantastic!!!
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Concurso de ideas "Edificio Parque Tecnológico"

Concurso de ideas "Edificio Parque Tecnológico" | Arquitectura sostenible | Scoop.it

Proyectos ganadores del concurso de ideas "Edificio Parque Tecnológico" en Santa Cruz de Tenerife.

 

El objeto y ámbito del concurso es la selección de ideas de naturaleza arquitectónica y urbanística, que planteen un modelo de espacio en el que debe concretarse el futuro de la manzana 4 en la zona 5 definida por el Plan Especial ITER Sistema General, aprobado definitivamente el 27 de enero de 2003.

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Rachel Armstrong: Architecture that repairs itself?

Venice is sinking. To save it, Rachel Armstrong says we need to outgrow architecture made of inert materials and, well, make architecture that grows itself. She proposes a not-quite-alive material that does its own repairs and sequesters carbon, too.

 

TED Fellow Rachel Armstrong is a sustainability innovator who creates new materials that possess some of the properties of living systems, and can be manipulated to "grow" architecture.

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Cúpula by Shigeru Ban

Cúpula by Shigeru Ban | Arquitectura sostenible | Scoop.it

Shigeru Ban en colaboración con los Ingenieros Tentech BV realizaron esta cúpula en IJburg Island Amsterdam (2003) y luego en Leidschen Rijn en el año 2004. El teatro tiene la forma de una cúpula geodésica de 30 m de diámetro. La estructura primaria es de cilindros de cartón de 20 cm de diámetro, que varían en su longitud entre los 1,2m y 1,5 metros. Buitink Tecnología fabricó la tela impermeable del pabellón, con un tejido de poliéster recubierto de PVC que se agarra sobre el esqueleto de cartón, en concreto las fijaciones se realizan en las piezas metálicas que forman los nudos que agarran los tubos de cartón.La construcción tenía que ser fácil de transportar ya que permaneció en su primera ubicación un par de semanas, la cúpula fue desmontada y trasladada a una nueva ubicación y así desde el 3 de julio de 2004 la Cúpula de papel se encuentra en Leidschen Rijn cerca de Utrecht.

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How Biomimicry Can Help Designers and Architects Find Inspiration To Solve Problems

How Biomimicry Can Help Designers and Architects Find Inspiration To Solve Problems | Arquitectura sostenible | Scoop.it
How you can unlock the design-enhancing secrets of biomimicry using online resources like AskNature and Biomimicry 3.8.

 

Shortly before his death in 2011, Steve Jobs said, “I think the biggest innovations of the 21st century will be at the intersection of biology and technology. A new era is beginning.” The crossroads that he spoke of actually has a name – biomimicry – and while it has been helping inventors, designers and architects innovate in genius ways for centuries, its value has become even more apparent in the past few years as we realize that Mother Nature is one of the universe’s most incredible designers. If you’re not yet familiar with biomimicry, it’s a word that describes finding design inspiration from nature to solve human problems. There are examples of biomimicry all around us – velcro, airplanes, solar panels modelled on ivy, and even buildings modelled after termite mounds. The people who came up with these inventions were obviously intelligent, but even more important, they were good observers able to make a connection between an issue they wanted to address and a solution that already existed in nature. If you’re an architect, designer or inventor facing a design dilemma that you simply can’t get past, or if you’re just feeling stuck in a rut, the answer may be right in front of you – if you know where to look.

 

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Sustainable Market Square by TomDavid Architecten

Sustainable Market Square by TomDavid Architecten | Arquitectura sostenible | Scoop.it

First place for TomDavid Architecten for Sustainable Market Square competition

 

The site is in a market square next to the Medina where a host of stalls fill the streets, bolstering the local economy. The Casablanca markets may not have the same draw on tourists as those in Marrakesh and Fes but they are a crucial aspect of community life and provide a consistent living for Casablanca residents.

Sustainability elements within the winning scheme take various forms. Rainwater harvesting has been implemented to reuse water in toilets, for cleaning the market square and for evaporation cooling techniques. The architects are also adamant that ‘in this case sustainability should be a societal journey’.

They explain: “This journey brought about by acquiring new awareness and perceptions, by generating new solutions, activating new behavioural patterns and, hence, cultural change. This process must be seen as a positive development under the responsibility of the local residents to increase economic, social and ecological capital.”

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SANAA Unveils Their Plans for Bocconi University Campus

SANAA Unveils Their Plans for Bocconi University Campus | Arquitectura sostenible | Scoop.it
SANAA has just unveiled their plans for the Bocconi University Campus in Milan, Italy. The design features various undulating structures, forming connective inner courtyards, that wind their way across a 17,500 square meter green space open to both students and neighborhood residents.

 

According to Paola Nicolin, a professor at Bocconi and writer for Domus, the University is a “playground” for the imagination, using “non-hierarchic compositional elements” to establish a relationship between the campus’ organic forms and the human lives which inhabit it. In Nicolin’s words, the project “speaks of transparency, empathy for nature, and far-sightedness.”

 

SANAA’s plan includes dormitories, a recreation centre, a School of Management, and buildings for Bocconi’s Master and Executive programmes.

 

Moreover, many energy-saving features have been incorporated, including insulated walls that are 50% transparent and 50% opaque, rainwater recycling systems, and roof-top solar panels.

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Marina Mall, Lusail, Qatar by HOK International

Marina Mall, Lusail, Qatar by HOK International | Arquitectura sostenible | Scoop.it

HOK has revealed interior designs for Marina Mall, a prime retail and leisure facility located in Lusail on the east coast of Qatar, approximately 15km north of Doha city centre. HOK’s designs are inspired by the natural forms created when water and land meet. Five interconnected retail islands, sculptural in shape, will be enclosed by a simple transparent membrane to create a light, sleek interior.

 

The sculptural and complex form of Marina Mall was made possible by HOK’s innovative use of parametrics; the use of scripting, digital simulation and modelling which enables designers to explore, generate and control new and complex architectural shapes.

 

Lusail is intended to create a vibrant, community-oriented lifestyle offering the best in modern urban living. HOK aims to achieve QSA 5 rating for Marina Mall (LEED Platinum equivalent).

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Vila Alstrup in Demark: energy-plus design

Vila Alstrup in Demark: energy-plus design | Arquitectura sostenible | Scoop.it

The house on the shore with a view of the Wadden Sea is an energy-plus house, which means that it produces more electricity and heat than it uses.


This was achieved without compromising on the exclusive qualities of a large home, including panoramic sea-views. The architecture uses clear and simple expression, open and transparent to the sea and more closed and private towards the neighbors. The unusual geometry of the volume is combined with a calm and unpretentious detailing, and a restrained material palette.

Designed with ‘passive house’ principles, the home is compact in form, with large windows facing the view to the south-west, to make optimal passive use of the sun’s heat. The angle also respects the shoreline protection zone, creating a triangular floor plan. The sloping roof is angled to optimize the performance of the solar heating cells. Passive solar heat gain is absorbed and accumulated in the interior concrete walls and floor slabs, while the south-west facing balcony and overhangs shade the facades and control the amount of seasonal solar energy. The balcony is a free-standing concrete slab completely eliminating any cold-bridging to the interior...

 

Read more about this contemporary and contextual green design at the article link...


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Orchard House by Studio Octopi

Orchard House by Studio Octopi | Arquitectura sostenible | Scoop.it

This courtyard house in the south-west of England by architects Studio Octopi integrates flush thresholds and wide doorways as subtly as possible, so that no one would notice it was specifically designed for a resident in a wheelchair.

 

Named Orchard House, the building sits on the former site of a walled garden and orchard in Wiltshire and Studio Octopi was asked by the planning authorities to integrate the historic stone wall into the proposals, even though it had almost entirely eroded. “We had to reinstate the wall and this helped to form a series of compound courtyard spaces,” architect Chris Romer-Lee told Dezeen.

 

The architects designed a two-storey house with both a staircase and a discreet lift, to enable easy access for a wheelchair without appearing unattractive. “The client was adamant that this house wouldn’t be dominated by her disabilities,” said Romer-Lee. “A family could easily live there without changing anything.”

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Metals for a new era

Metals for a new era | Arquitectura sostenible | Scoop.it

Cars that change colour at the push of a button; metals that strengthen with use; buildings that harness energy from the wind... research into designing structural materials that are both responsive and functional is shifting such ideas from the realm of fantasy to reality.

 

Designing structural materials that can also harness energy is another important focus.

 

"We put solar cells on the roof: they play no structural role. We should be able to design materials that do both. On a windy day, buildings sway and that energy should be collected," Associate Professor Hutchinson said.

 

"We're working on ways to cheaply functionalise structural materials so that different forms of energy (mechanical, electromagnetic, etc) can be harvested from them.

 

"I see a future where there is no difference between functional and structural materials, but we design multi-functional materials that can do both."

 

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Room for sustainable thinking

Room for sustainable thinking | Arquitectura sostenible | Scoop.it
Inspirational conference centre in the treetops of Hechtel-Eksel in Belgium


A gem has been created within the woods of Hechtel-Eksel in Belgium. Described as inspirational, The TREEHOUSE has the vision to bridge the extensive gap between ecology and the economy.

 

Sappi, The Flemish Forest and Nature Agency, the commune of Hechtel-Eksel and Proximity have joined forces with the aim of encouraging companies, politicians and organisations to embrace sustainability in their daily activities. They all share one vision: to enhance the quality of the environment and social responsibility for the benefit of people, planet and prosperity.

 

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archYable's comment, November 19, 2012 4:12 PM
thanks for your interest
Angeles's comment, November 19, 2012 4:17 PM
you´re welcome!
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TOYO ITO: "What Was Metabolism? Reflections on the Life of Kiyonori Kikutake"

TOYO ITO: "What Was Metabolism? Reflections on the Life of Kiyonori Kikutake" | Arquitectura sostenible | Scoop.it

The Metabolist Movement in the 1960s established the foundation from which contemporary architecture in Japan has emerged up to the present. Even today, the visionary architectural and urban projects created by the leading Metabolist Kiyonori Kikutake continue to shine brightly, according to Toyo Ito. In this lecture, he will consider Metabolism’s significance today through his rereading of Kikutake's works of that time.

 

Toyo Ito was born in Seoul; after graduating from the University of Tokyo, Department of Architecture, he worked at Kiyonori Kikutake Architects and Associates before establishing his own office, under the name Urban Robot, in 1971. With Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects since 1979, Ito has completed many notable projects, including the widely published Sendai Mediatheque (2000), Tower of Winds in Yokohama (1986), Tama Art University Library (2007), and Toyo Ito Museum of Architecture (2011). "Ripples," a metal street furniture piece, won the Compasso D'Oro, the prestigious Italian furniture prize, in 2004. Toyo Ito's many awards received for architecture include the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement, at the 2002 Venice Architecture Biennial, and the Golden Lion for Best Pavilion, for the Japanese Pavilion at Venice in 2012.

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Bioclimatic House in the Canary Islands, Spain

Bioclimatic House in the Canary Islands, Spain | Arquitectura sostenible | Scoop.it

This bioclimatic house, by Estudio José Luis Rodríguez, is a self-sufficient structure integrated into the terrain of the Canary Islands, a landscape characterized by a continuous terracing of the extreme topography.

 

In response to this site, the design features a basalt stone wall that supports a light structure of plywood, galvanized steel walls and glass.

The building's orientation is determined by solar radiation; photovoltaic panels produce electricity, in order to achieve zero carbon emissions. The living area is connected to the outside with a space that is protected from sun and wind, while a wall located in the sleeping area to the north has a high thermal mass for passive temperature control.

The design also aims to reduce its ecological footprint on the use of materials and construction systems by using local materials (basalt wall insulation covered with volcanic lapilli, for example), environmentally certified materials and no harmful elements, such as VOC compounds in synthetic paints and varnishes.

 

View more images of this unique, contextural and contemporary green project at the link to ArchDaily's feature...


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FUCOL INGENIERIA's curator insight, April 12, 2015 10:23 AM

añada su visión ...

David Regalado's curator insight, July 3, 2015 7:47 AM

Que gran trabajo!!!! Esto es lo que queremos en las Islas Canarias;)

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Carlo Ratti: Architecture that senses and responds

With his team at SENSEable City Lab, MIT's Carlo Ratti makes cool things by sensing the data we create. He pulls from passive data sets -- like the calls we make, the garbage we throw away -- to create surprising visualizations of city life. And he and his team create dazzling interactive environments from moving water and flying light, powered by simple gestures caught through sensors.

 

Carlo Ratti directs the MIT SENSEable City Lab, which explores the "real-time city" by studying the way sensors and electronics relate to the built environment. He's opening a research center in Singapore as part of an MIT-led initiative on the Future of Urban Mobility.

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