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Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010

Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010 | Around the World in One Semester- Geography 200 | Scoop.it

Globalization has hit...hard and fast. 


Via Seth Dixon
Cam E's insight:

Apart from what can be said about the process of Globalization, this is just impressive under the lens of what can be done in 20 years to change the skylines and landscapes of an area. Notice the lack of vegetation in the second picture, and while it may just be an effect of the different time of day or season, they sky seems a lot more fogged in the second picture, possibly due to pollution.

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Crissy Borton's curator insight, December 11, 2012 8:08 PM

It looks like a completely different city. Sadly you can no longer see any green.

Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 8:02 PM

Shanghai could arguably be the best example of globalization in the world today. In the span of 20 years, it has gone from a sparse city with some commerce on the river to a major urban center with the skyscrapers and neon lights. The transformation between the two images is staggering and it's easy to see the resemblance between current day Shanghai and it's partner globalized cities like New York and Seoul.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 3:35 PM

Shanghai has transformed and globalized so quickly in the last twenty years that it doesn't even look like that same place. Skies that were once seen are now blocked by skyscrapers. Buildings that still remain are overpowered and do not stand out like they once did.

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Online Quizzes for Regional Geography

Online Quizzes for Regional Geography | Around the World in One Semester- Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"For Regional Geography, I ask that all my students take an online quizzes before coming to class because it is very difficult to intelligently discuss European issues if you don’t know the countries of Europe, where they are and what other countries are on their borders.  Quizzes and knowing places doesn’t define geography, but if geography were English literature, knowing about places could be described as the alphabet–before you write a sonnet or critique an essay, you better know your ABC’s and basic grammar.  Given that, I like the Lizard Point Geography quizzes, Sheppard Software quizzes and those from Click that ‘Hood; they are simple, straightforward and comprehensive."


Via Seth Dixon
Cam E's insight:

Quizzes for Geo 200!

 

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AckerbauHalle's curator insight, January 23, 9:44 PM

Kleiner Beitrag zur Geographie: Ein online Spiel um regionale Kenntnisse zu erweitern 

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, February 2, 3:52 PM

Exámenes en línea para Geografía.

SFDSLibrary's curator insight, May 13, 5:16 AM

Quizzes to test a students knowledge of places and countries.

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Drop bears target tourists, study says

Drop bears target tourists, study says | Around the World in One Semester- Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Drop bears are less likely to attack people with Australian accents, according to experts at the University of Tasmania.
Cam E's insight:

Beware the dangerous Drop Bear! This marsupial can be up to 260 pounds, and are extremely fake! There's been a popular joke around the internet and Australia about this fake animal, and while it's funny, it's also an interesting experiment in other culture's conceptions of Australia. The popular imagination is Australia is filled with animals waiting to kill you, and while that may be... more true than other places. It's not nearly as bad as one would think. I think the idea that Drop Bears only target tourists is a parody of that fear.

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Kiribati and Climate Change

Kiribati and Climate Change | Around the World in One Semester- Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Fearing that climate change could wipe out their Pacific archipelago, the leaders of Kiribati are considering an unusual backup plan: moving the population to Fiji.

 

How urgent is the issue of climate change?  That question is not only geographic in content, but the response might also be somewhat contingent on geography as well.  If your country literally has no higher ground to retreat to, the thought of even minimal sea level change would be totally devastating. 


Via Seth Dixon
Cam E's insight:

This is more than immigration, this plan is moving an entire country within another! Climate change doesn't effect the world equally in the same way that different countries are nowhere near equal. In a place as small as Kiribati, the entire place could be wiped out. The population of the nation is around 100,000 for reference.

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 26, 11:42 AM

The leaders from Kiribati are considering moving some of their population to Fiji. They fear climate change could destroy their islands and force their population to leave. They want to purchase 6,000 acres from Fiji, which should be enough land for Kiribati's 103,000 people. The people hope they will not have to move to Fiji, but buying this land is a good backup plan incase their islands are a victim to climate change.   

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Lurking in the Deep

Lurking in the Deep | Around the World in One Semester- Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Divers on Australia's Great Barrier Reef recently snapped rare pictures of a wobbegong, or carpet shark, swallowing a bamboo shark whole.

 

The diversity of life on this planet and the ecosystems which such creatures live in is something that continually leaves me in awe at the wonders of the natural world.


Via Seth Dixon
Cam E's insight:

The Great Barrier Reef is one of the most biologically diverse regions in the world, and the ecosystem that exists there is extremely delicate, as well as extremely fantastic, as seen in this article.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2:41 PM

When I first saw this image I thought that this white shark was swimming into a chest or something anything except for another shark. Then when opening the article it was apparent that the shark was being eaten by another shark. 

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 23, 2:57 PM

A wobbegong, also known as the carpet shark, engulfs a bamboo shark in the Great Barrier Reef. This was a surprising and rare photo for Divers in Australia. It is crazy how animals so close in relativity can instantly become predators, and possibly a meal, to each other!

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, September 1, 7:38 AM

This article reminds me of another video i've seen recently of a grouper fish swallowing a 4-foot black tip shark whole. A fisherman caught that on camera while trying to reel in the shark. Time and time again I'm reminded that not everything in nature is as it seems and that the unexpected should be expected. 

This makes me want to buy some scuba gear and take some diving classes, I ought to conquer my fear of sharks by safely observing them with a research team! 

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Australia is rated best place to live and work for third year running

Australia is rated best place to live and work for third year running | Around the World in One Semester- Geography 200 | Scoop.it
UK comes 10th in OECD index, behind US and Scandinavian countries but ahead of France and Germany (RT @guardian: Australia is rated best place to live and work for third year running http://t.co/303ziQyhmm...

Via Seth Dixon
Cam E's insight:

I wonder if these ratings take "horrible spiders hiding in your car and shoes waiting to strike" into account, but in all honesty this is not much of a problem in the cities of Australia. Tourists and foreign businesses in the area do have to worry about the occasional Drop Bear (make sure to look this one up), but in all seriousness Australia has an interesting take on things, compulsory voting ensures that citizen participation in the government is always high, and health scores far outstrip many other industrialized regions.

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Peter Phillips's curator insight, June 24, 2013 4:15 PM

What pull factors and push factors can you identify?

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Australians killed in Afghanistan

Australians killed in Afghanistan | Around the World in One Semester- Geography 200 | Scoop.it

DE: The fact that Australians fight in the War in Afghanistan only reinforces just how small the globe is and how the West has literally become more and more its own entity. Australia, since its  colonial days, has contributed soldiers to both world wars, Vietnam and many other conflicts, including Afghanistan. Their citizens too lay their lives down in the name of democracy and freedom. While it is an American war, soldiers from throughout the free world (America, Canada, Britain, France, Germany, Australia, etc.) unite under common beliefs and leadership to attempt to spread their democratic ideals.


Via Seth Dixon
Cam E's insight:

The article brings up some important facts about the conglomerate known as "The West," and while Australia is geographically displaced in relation to the other countries, it plays just as much as a part due to its history and the cultural heritage of its people.

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Asia Times Online :: Jakarta rejects China's 'nine-dash line'

Asia Times Online. The Asia News Hub providing the latest news and analysis regarding economics, events and trends in business, economy and politics throughout Asia.
Cam E's insight:

With this, Indonesia has formally entered the South China Sea dispute. The question I have is why now of all times? They've stayed out of it for over two decades. Could it be due to China's increased aggression? If they're intent on taking the area, then their opponents will also logically get louder. Maybe in this case Indonesia always had a stake in the matter, but didn't feel the need to speak up until tensions had risen to the point they are at now.

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Laos May Bear Cost of Planned Chinese Railroad

Laos May Bear Cost of Planned Chinese Railroad | Around the World in One Semester- Geography 200 | Scoop.it
China wants a railroad linking it to Thailand and on to the Bay of Bengal in Myanmar, but some international groups warn that it may put a big burden on Laos.

Via Seth Dixon
Cam E's insight:

Southeast Asia is right in China's backyard, and is very important to China as a trading partner. Not only this, but China is on its way to becoming a superpower, and expanding their influence in every direction is one way to cement this fact, usually at the expense of others.

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 19, 4:12 PM

The Chinese-financed railroad is being built to pass thru Laos into the mega-city of Bangkok. China wants this railroad built to further expand its trading with Southeast Asia. Laos, a very poor and rural country may see small profits from this project. The most powerful country in this area, China, should have no problem building this railroad in its weak and poor neighboring country, Laos.  

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 1:53 PM

This article depicts the major problem between trade route going through Laos. Laos is upset because they have no input in anything even though the railways will intersect through their country by the Chinese and their railways for imports and exports. "China wants a railroad linking it to Thailand and on to the Bay of Bengal in Myanmar, but some international groups warn that it may put a big burden on Laos". China wants to link to  Bangkok and then on to the Bay of Bengal in Maymar expanding China’s  enormous trade with Southeast Asia. Creating no way for Laos to get out of this deal though there has been some hesitation there will not be any stopping the maintenance of the soon to be power railways suffocating Laos. 

 
Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 11:18 AM

The article discusses how China’s wish to build a rail road through southeast Asia will most likely incur a high cost from the country of Laos that the rail road will go through.  China is anxious to regain its power in the area and its terms for the rail road will leave Laos severely indebted to China to such an extent that many see it as China trying to make Laos a vessel state.

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Environment, Energy and Resilience

Indonesia has the largest share of the world's mangroves — coastal forests that have adapted to saltwater environments. They play important environmental and ecological roles.

 

Mangroves play a key role of acting as an ecological buffer in coastal region that provide the area with resilience against tsunamis, hurricanes and other forms of coastal flooding.  Their role in carbon sequestration is also vital as energy emissions globally continue to rise.  So let's jump scales: how are global issues locally important?  How is the local deeply global?  How can stakeholders at either scale find common ground with the other?  


Via Seth Dixon
Cam E's insight:

Mangroves are a natural barrier to hurricanes, tsunamis, and the flooding that come with it in a very important way. It's often suggested that there is a battle between opposing sides of the environment and business, but in a situation like this, and in many others, the natural environment exists for a reason and protects the land against severe damage. In this way there's an economic incentive to protect natural environments as well as an ecological one.

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Emma Lafleur's curator insight, April 30, 2013 4:51 PM

It's nice to see that people are trying to save these forests and are experiencing some success. Deforestation has many bad consequences including flooding, an increase in carbon emissions, and a decrease in biodiversity. People everywhere need to learn that even though we can gain some money by using the land for something other than forest, it is more beneficial to leave the forest because it not only saves the environment, forests also directly helps humans because of the health and safety benefits. There are a lot of people around the world trying to save the forests, but sadly it is not an easy task.

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 9, 2013 5:34 PM

Indonesia is home to 1/4 of the worlds mangrove trees. These trees are salt tolerant and grow along the coastlines. They provide protection from tidal floods and erosion and provide homes for the islands biodiversity. The most important thing they do however is provide the villagers with wood  to make shrimp ponds and fire wood. They also protect the mangroves ecosystem. These trees are so very important to Indonesia, their economy and their life style. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 14, 4:35 AM

The NPR report discusses how valuable the mangrove forests of Indonesia are not just locally important, but globally important as well. Locally, they provide protection from flooding and tsunami as well as being incredibly significant in the overall ecology of the area. Globally, the mangroves are incredibly efficient at reducing carbon dioxide compared to most other types of forests. The Indonesian people have an interest in protecting the mangroves for their own local benefits, but there is interest internationally in the mangroves as buying and protecting them allows for a country to earn carbon credits. The dilemma lies in that clearing the mangroves for agriculture is a large economic advantage, but ruins the environmental benefits. A balance needs to be struck with the international community to protect the mangroves for the world while providing significant economic benefits to Indonesia.

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Guardian: Thailand flooding threatens Bangkok

Guardian: Thailand flooding threatens Bangkok | Around the World in One Semester- Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Prime minister Yingluck Shinawatra warns population to expect floods as rising waters reach capital city...

Geographic ironies....some struggle in drought while others have more water than their lands can handle. 


Via Seth Dixon
Cam E's insight:

Another image gallery! This one showcases the Thailand flooding. I found the first picture immediately interesting in that the highway signs are identical to our ones over here, save the difference of language. There's also just as much play as their is damage here. Many pictures show children and even older people taking the time to play around in the sudden water that floods into their city. In countries where flooding is a matter of "when" rather than "if," the citizens are often more prepared and take a less frantic approach as they know what to do. That being said, it is more rare of flooding to hit Bangkok than many other places in Thailand, so this did cause some serious disaster.

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A Keyhole into Burma

A Keyhole into Burma | Around the World in One Semester- Geography 200 | Scoop.it
On my last afternoon in Bagan, I went in search of a meal that would serve as both lunch and dinner, before boarding my flight...

 

As a notoriously closed society, glimpses into Burma become all the more important as Burma shows signs of  (possibly) opening up politically for the first time in decades.


Via Seth Dixon
Cam E's insight:

Yet another collection of pictures I'm scooping, but this time there's over 100 of them! Getting a western view into the insulated society of Burma is a rare opportunity, this shows some interesting pastimes such as Water buffalo surfing, but also things of major cultural significance, such as the importance of Buddhism.

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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 27, 2012 2:53 PM
It's good to see a place like Burma is showing signs of opening up politically, it shows other poor countries could do the same.
Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 1:41 PM

This article depicts the differences and the little things that we in the USA take for granted for instance in this case it is a cd that is known as the "Western" type of misc and mass media culture that has been transported in this Burmese society.  It truly is the little things such as the Robbie Williams CD that is being depicted as not only the Western musical society but also being grouped with Bob Marley songs that would depict from the Burmese translation the Western society. And even though the people in this society don't know what the lyrics mean they can still be moved by the melody.  

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China calls on U.S. to restrain ally Japan as tension simmers

China calls on U.S. to restrain ally Japan as tension simmers | Around the World in One Semester- Geography 200 | Scoop.it
China called on the United States on Tuesday to restrain ally Japan and chided another U.S. ally, the Philippines, at the end of talks between American and Chinese defense chiefs ...
Cam E's insight:

I wanted to scoop this article for the implications of the headline rather than the dispute that it covers, as it shows an interesting dynamic between East Asian countries and the United States. China is calling for the US to "Restrain" Japan as if Japan were solely a proxy of the US. This has historical context as the US was integral in rebuilding Japan after World War 2, and to this day Japan is not allowed to have a traditional "military", but still find a way to have one through the Japanese Self Defense Force... which is 10th on many lists for most powerful armies in the world. The wording of the article also suggests that China doesn't see Japan as too much of a threat, it suggests that Japan is only a minor nuisance and it's more effective to just go to the "higher power" of sorts than to deal with them. This is of course a little presumptuous as Japan is independent, and quite powerful on their own. Finally this article demonstrates the dynamic of the US and the rest of the world. The US doesn't necessary have to even take action, but just by supporting or condemning something, the actions of other countries will change.

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Mongolia's Nomads

Mongolia's Nomads | Around the World in One Semester- Geography 200 | Scoop.it

Through his Vanishing Cultures Project photographer Taylor Weidman documents threatened ways of life.  About his work in Mongolia, he states: "Mongolian pastoral herders make up one of the world's largest remaining nomadic cultures. For millennia they have lived on the steppes, grazing their livestock on the lush grasslands. But today, their traditional way of life is at risk on multiple fronts. Alongside a rapidly changing economic landscape, climate change and desertification are also threatening nomadic life, killing both herds and grazing land."


Via Seth Dixon
Cam E's insight:

Time for more pictures, my favorite part of scooping. Mongolia is almost entirely forgotten in US education, to the point where many of the people I know aren't even sure if there's a government at all. My favorite part of these pictures comes from the fusion of technology and tradition though. We see traditional housing and boys carrying water to their homes, and then a flat screen television in the makeshift house. Motorcycles are used to herd animals, and solar polar is used to power cell phones for the nomads. What I think is important here among other things is the idea that humanity has potentially reached a point where we cannot go backwards tech-wise. The dark ages in Europe saw knowledge being lost, and there are claims that humanity will wipe out its own tech in a great war, but now that we have the knowledge and ability to use solar panels and automobiles, I don't believe we'll ever lose them as a species.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 2, 2013 9:17 AM

In times of ecological hardships and global economic restructuring, many children of nomadic herders are seeking employment out of the rural areas and in the urban environment.  The cultural change that this represents is for Mongolia enormous and is captured wonderfully in this photo gallery.  Pictured above are the ger (yurt) camps that ring the capital city Ulaanbaatar.  Ulaanbaatar houses a permanent population of displaced nomads. During the winter, Ulaanbaatar is the second most air-polluted capital in the world due largely to coal burning.


Tags: Mongolia, images, indigenous, culture, globalization.  

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 12, 2013 3:44 PM

What factors are threatening pastoral herders way of life? Why?

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Kate Middleton Channels Jackie Kennedy on Royal Tour of New Zealand | TIME

Kate Middleton Channels Jackie Kennedy on Royal Tour of New Zealand | TIME | Around the World in One Semester- Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Kate looks flawless, holds cute baby, manages to not fall
Cam E's insight:

Focusing less on Kate Middleton herself, but more of what's going on here. It seems very normal to us, but If an alien came down to Earth and was only provided basic geopolitical understanding, they might wonder why a royal family from across the world is visiting this country out in the ocean? New Zealand was one of the last major landmasses settled by humans, with only a 300-400 year gap between the first settlers, and the appearance of the Dutch. It later became a dominion of the British Empire, which is why it's now very European.

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Ephemeral islands and other states-in-waiting

Ephemeral islands and other states-in-waiting | Around the World in One Semester- Geography 200 | Scoop.it
architectural conjecture :: urban speculation :: landscape futures...

 

In the 1960s when the island of Surtsey (literally) erupted onto the scene off the coast of Iceland, it's national sovereignty was not really called into question.  The seamount, or near island named Ferdinandea in the Mediterranean is not even an island yet and countries are already positioning themselves to claim it.  Only 6 feet below sea level, this seamount is incredibly valuable real estate because is a country can successfully came this territory, they could also lay claim to an Exclusive Economic Zone, extending up to 200 nautical miles beyond the coast.


Via Seth Dixon
Cam E's insight:

This isn't an article from Oceania necessarily, but one that pertains to it. In an area made up of small island nations, the literal overnight emergence of new ones can change the politics of the surrounding countries, and even the number of seats at the United Nations in the far future.

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Brett Sinica's curator insight, December 10, 2013 1:56 PM

These soon-to-be island would sure make one interesting auction.  Many of the small landforms in the world, and especially Pacific have always been contested by powerhouses such as China, Japan, or other smaller countries.  Having control isn't for the island itself necessarily but for what the ocean waters surrounding the landform may contain.  It could be fishing, trade routes, or even oil or natural gas settlements.  It makes it even more intersting when many of these underground landforms are possible volcanoes considering the majority of active volcanoes are underwater and near the ring of fire.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 5:23 PM

When I read something like this all I can think is maybe this is what happened to Atlantis.  What if Atlantis was an island like this that existed just long enough for people to build a society on and then it sank beneath the sea.  Another think this makes me think of is the novel “Jingo” by Terry Pratchett, in it an island rises from the sea and leads to a war over which country owns it.  This is just an interesting phenomenon that leads to world arguments.

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Six-Legged Giant Finds Secret Hideaway, Hides For 80 Years

Six-Legged Giant Finds Secret Hideaway, Hides For 80 Years | Around the World in One Semester- Geography 200 | Scoop.it
The insect is so large — as big as a human hand — it's been dubbed a "tree lobster." It was thought to be extinct, but some enterprising entomologists scoured a barren hunk of rock in the middle of the ocean and found surviving Lord Howe Island...

 

Island Biogeography is endlessly fascinating and provides some of the most striking species we have on Earth.  The physical habitat is fragmented and the genetic diversity is limited.  Within this context, species evolve to fill ecological niches within their particular locale.  This NPR article demonstrates the story of but one of these incredible species that never could have evolved on the continents.  In modern society, more extinctions are happening on islands than anywhere else as 'specialist' species are in greater competition with 'generalists.' 


Via Seth Dixon
Cam E's insight:

I wouldn't want to come across that in my bed at night! The Europeans called this thing the "Tree Lobster" in the past, and it seems to hold up. Is it possible that these critters exist only on this island? What movement in the past caused them to be isolated like this?

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2:56 PM

When reading I found out that they call it "Ball's Pyramid"because that is what is left from the last volcano that emerged from the sea about 7 million years ago."British naval officer named Ball was the first European to see it in 1788. It sits off Australia, in the South Pacific. It is extremely narrow, 1,844 feet high, and it sits alone.

What's more, for years this place had a secret. At 225 feet above sea level, hanging on the rock surface, there is a small, spindly little bush, and under that bush, a few years ago, two climbers, working in the dark, found something totally improbable hiding in the soil below. How it got there, we still don't know."

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 5:33 PM

This article freeked me out at first.  The idea of hand sized bugs is just…yuck!  But after reading the article I found it very interesting.  That these bugs managed to survive on a single bush on an island isolated from the world.  The description of them as acting un-buglike by peering off into couples that sleep cuddling with each other is just kind of cool.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 25, 7:35 AM

On Ball's Pyramid the stick insect is different than any other insect I have seen. The size of it is terrifying, as it as big as a human hand. There are many different kinds of animals or insects someone can find on remote islands, islands such as Madagascar, Australia and even on this small island, which is located off of Australia's coast in the Pacific.    

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This week, Samoa will skip Friday

This week, Samoa will skip Friday | Around the World in One Semester- Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"Just this once, Samoa is making Dec. 30 disappear."

 

I hope you enjoy your Friday, because they won't in Samoa.  It didn't even happen, since they've canceled Friday Dec. 30th and just skipped straight to Dec 31st.  This would make no sense without an understanding of the International Date Line and the regional economic networks of Oceania.  Since Samoa's economy in tightly connected to New Zealand and Australia (on the 'other' side of the IDL) it's financially beneficial to have their work weeks line up to faciliate same day communications and business interactions.   For more see: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2011-12-29/samoa-time-zone-jump/3751254 and http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/30/world/asia/samoa-to-skip-friday-and-switch-time-zones.html?ref=sethmydans


Via Seth Dixon
Cam E's insight:

Thank God It's... Saturday? December 30th was cancelled in Samoa due to the country being right on the border of the international date line. It's important for them to stay in step with New Zealand and Australia where many of their business connections lie. It's important to remember that calenders are a man made invention too, as odd as this whole situation sounds.

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 26, 11:20 AM

I agree with the decision Samoa made to switch to the West side of the International Date Line. By doing this, the country completely skipped a day. Also, years ago Samoa switched from driving on the right side of the road (American style) to the left side (British style). They made these changes because their economy is connected to countries on the other side of the IDL, such as Australia and New Zealand.  

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Australia Adds New Colors to Weather Forecasting Chart as Temperatures Skyrocket

Australia Adds New Colors to Weather Forecasting Chart as Temperatures Skyrocket | Around the World in One Semester- Geography 200 | Scoop.it
As heat records continue to be shattered with every passing day, Australia's Bureau of Meteorology has updated its weather forecasting chart to reflect rising temperatures.

Via Seth Dixon
Cam E's insight:

They should just skip the middle-man and make "Hell" a color. Dry land, low rainfall, and the flows of El Nino all contribute to the intense heat found in Australia.

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Stacey Jackson's curator insight, May 8, 2013 5:55 PM

It's unfortunate to see that climate change has become so bad that scientists are now re-working maps to reflect the increasing temperatures. As a geography student, I'd be interested to see this heat map side-by-side with a map on wildfires in Australia. My guess is there would be parallels. 

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Philippine court backs birth control

Philippine court backs birth control | Around the World in One Semester- Geography 200 | Scoop.it
The Supreme Court in the Philippines approves a birth control law, despite a fierce fight by the influential Catholic Church.
Cam E's insight:

Many people wouldn't think it, but the Philippines is the third largest Catholic country in the world after Brazil and Mexico. As expected this is a product of colonization, this time being from the Spanish during the 16th century. Over 80 percent of the country identifies as Catholic, that's about 75.5 million people. An important thing to keep in mind in catholic countries is the presence of the influence from an extra-national body, this being the Catholic Church. In this way the views of the Pope wield great influence.

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How Vietnam became a coffee giant

How Vietnam became a coffee giant | Around the World in One Semester- Geography 200 | Scoop.it

"Think of coffee and you will probably think of Brazil, Colombia, or maybe Ethiopia. But the world's second largest exporter today is Vietnam. How did its market share jump from 0.1% to 20% in just 30 years, and how has this rapid change affected the country?"

 


Via Seth Dixon
Cam E's insight:

The story of how this happened is linked to colonization, as most articles like this are. Vietnam was a climate primed to make coffee, but what effect does the introduction of this foreign crop have on the local wildlife and fauna? When the carefully developed placement of plants and animals is disturbed by human interference, there will always be consequences in some way.

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 12:13 PM

This is a tough predicament, coffee growing is providing a stable income for many Vietnamese but land clearing is ruining the environment. Land mines are still in the soil in many places and could cause severe injury or loss of life. How long before the country cannot produce enough coffee and farmers start to suffer again?

Amanda Morgan's comment, September 13, 3:21 PM
Without globalization, the vietnamese would not be able to participate in the high demand for coffee, which inevitably turned around their country;s economy. Vietnam is capitalizing from using their country's geography and resources of the land.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 7:49 AM

Without globalization, the vietnamese would not be able to participate in the high demand for coffee, which inevitably turned around their country;s economy. Vietnam is capitalizing from using their country's geography and resources of the land.

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Photos of Southeast Asia

Photos of Southeast Asia | Around the World in One Semester- Geography 200 | Scoop.it

This is an incredibly photo gallery of Vietnam (pictured) and Cambodia.  The photographer, Michael Poliza, has many other place and nature-based galleries at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/poliza/sets/ ;


Via Seth Dixon
Cam E's insight:

Another day, another photo gallery. This time we have a stunning array of pictures from Southeast Asia, mainly from Vietnam and Cambodia. Many of these pictures showcase the importance of the sea to life in those regions, as well as the history, which is deeply involved with Buddhism, that is often glossed over in western history books.

 

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 16, 2:35 PM

Absolutely breath taking! From the pictures from the skyline, it is hard to tell that it is inhabited due to its high elevations, but closer pictures of the land and buildings compare to other places in the world, but hold their own importance. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 18, 2:56 PM

By viewing these pictures of areas throughout Cambodia and Vietnam, one can grasp aspects of their culture. From the Buddha statues, historic sites and beautiful natural landscapes. This photographer does a great job of capturing important areas within Southeast Asia. These great pictures encourage people to visit these overlooked areas of the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:59 PM

If I had a helicopter I would certainly be taking it out to see stuff like this. Vietnam is very natural looking. Its lands are filled with awesome demography and topography. What a beautiful sight to see.

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Philippines Overtakes India as Hub of Call Centers

Philippines Overtakes India as Hub of Call Centers | Around the World in One Semester- Geography 200 | Scoop.it
Many companies have moved their customer service lines to Manila to take advantage of workers who speak lightly accented English and are familiar with American culture.

 

The geography of globalization is epitomized by relentless change and marked by continual turnover.  Cultural and economic factors play significant roles in creating potential advantages for receiving outsourced jobs (whether that is beneficially long-term is another discussion). 


Via Seth Dixon
Cam E's insight:

The fact that so many Filipinos speak English is an important one to understand. This brings jobs to the Philippines, but at the expense of local culture. High income and social standing in the Philippines is often correlated with English, as many of the high-ranking citizens attend universities in the United States and return with degrees, and in turn teach their children English. This marginalizes their own language in a way, and is something to keep aware of, as it's one thing that the United States does not face in many areas, that most other countries around the world do.  

 

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Brian Nicoll's curator insight, December 11, 2012 10:40 PM

I liked this article simply because I could relate it to my own personal experiences speaking with someone at a call center.  I guess it is kind of interesting that the Phillippines has overtaken India in terms of number of call centers.  What was reallly interesting though was how familiar those at the call centers were of Americans. 

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 10, 2013 5:27 PM

Companies have moved their customer service lines to Manila because there the workers speak a lightly accented English and are more familiar with American culture then they are over in India. This shows the maturation of the outsourcing buisness and shows the preference for American English.  

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Drought led to demise of ancient city of Angkor

Drought led to demise of ancient city of Angkor | Around the World in One Semester- Geography 200 | Scoop.it
The ancient city of Angkor — the most famous monument of which is the breathtaking ruined temple of Angkor Wat — might have collapsed due to valiant but ultimately failed efforts to battle drought, scientists find.

 

Why do societies collapse?  Often they are overextended, consume too many resources for their hinterland network to supply or they aren't able to adapt to changes to the system.  Angkor Wat, the largest urban complex of the pre-industrial world, collapsed primarily due to drought conditions and a changing ecology.  Without sufficient water resources, the network collapsed.  What other environment 'collapses' can you think of?   


Via Seth Dixon
Cam E's insight:

It's easy to forget that for most of history, even the greatest of empires were subject to the whims of the climate. The ability to survive in places where humans really shouldn't thrive is only a recent development thanks to technology, but a drought is something the mightiest army can't fight, and all the wealth in the world will not stop, without the right technology.

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Elizabeth Allen's comment, December 6, 2012 12:38 PM
Societies can collapse if they fall victim to poor economics, poor political systems, and poor geographical reasons. In this case a major factor in Angkor's collapse was due to the change in climate. The drought was severe enough to crumble Angkor.
Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 9, 2013 5:50 PM

Scientists have found that the ancient city of Angkor failed do to drought. Angkor has a system of moats, channels, and reservoirs, so with such a system in place how could they have such a drought? Simply there water system was unable to to handle the change in climate.  

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 2:38 PM

This new study shows that even back in time people struggled with environmental challenges. We normally think of people in the past as being much more adaptive to their environments and that only in the modern age nature and humans have come into conflict. The surrender of Angkor Wat to drought shows that even though we have amazing technology today, water is still a staple of life. 

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Imperial document on education to be disclosed -NHK WORLD English-

NHK WORLD is the international broadcasting service of NHK.
Cam E's insight:

This is an interesting historical find that's important to the culture of Japan. This document was the blueprint for the education policies and morals implemented in schools which can help account for Japan's militaristic tendencies during the Second World War. It's important for even history which is not so wonderful to be put on display, as it's just as much a part of the past. An interesting side note also is the idea that history is portrayed differently in different countries. Japan was an ally of Nazi Germany during the second World War, and  as such, one will find that the Nazis aren't as vehemently opposed as they are in the US and Europe. One thing I've found from consuming media from both countries is that the US more often than not portrays "evil" Nazis, while Japan flips this around and portrays German soldiers neutrally or "more human" more often than not.

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Shanghai Warms Up To A New Cuisine: Chinese Food, American-Style

Shanghai Warms Up To A New Cuisine: Chinese Food, American-Style | Around the World in One Semester- Geography 200 | Scoop.it
At a new restaurant, expats find a taste of home and locals try foreign treats like fortune cookies.

 

Imagine living in China and missing Chinese food. It happens. American expatriates who grew up with popular takeout dishes like General Tso's chicken can't find it in China because it essentially doesn't exist here. Much of the Chinese food we grew up with isn't really Chinese. It's an American version of Chinese food. Chinese immigrants created it over time, adapting recipes with U.S. ingredients to appeal to American palates.  Now, Americans living in Shanghai can get a fix of their beloved Chinatown cuisine at a new restaurant.


Via Seth Dixon
Cam E's insight:

Now this is interesting. Migrants from a home country shift their culture to appeal a bit more to the country they integrate into, and then the home country adopts these changes to cater to tourists from the integrated country. I can't tell if this counts as reclaiming a facet of culture that was changed, solely a smart business move, or both.

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Jennifer Brown's curator insight, September 10, 12:33 PM

I wonder if this is more for the "selfish" american or if they are trying to fatten up the Chinese population.

Amanda Morgan's comment, September 13, 1:59 PM
This story is awesome! the differences between Chinese and Chinese American food show how globalization and immigration fuses cultures together. The owners of Fortune Cookie are able to share the American Chinese food only because of globalization. If they could not receive American products and brands such as skippy peanut butter and heinz ketchup, the restaurant simply would not function for its purpose.
Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 7:53 AM

This story is awesome! the differences between Chinese and Chinese American food show how globalization and immigration fuses cultures together. The owners of Fortune Cookie are able to share the American Chinese food only because of globalization. If they could not receive American products and brands such as skippy peanut butter and heinz ketchup, the restaurant simply would not function for its purpose.

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Hiroshima after the Atomic Bomb

Hiroshima after the Atomic Bomb | Around the World in One Semester- Geography 200 | Scoop.it
360° panoramic photography by Harbert F. Austin Jr.. Visit us to see more amazing panoramas from Japan and thousands of other places in the world.

 

The interactive panorama is eerily compelling...this is a haunting image. 


Via Seth Dixon
Cam E's insight:

The thing that always stumps me about pictures after bombings and other disasters is the reason why some things are left standing. Here we see buildings destroyed and utterly annihilated as far as the eye can see, yet the telephone poles are still standing in some areas. The picture can't capture the true scope of the destruction, but it also shows how destruction is a bit random in its own way.

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Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 6:33 PM
The result of war against each other
Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 29, 2013 11:15 AM

The panorama is eery.  The trees are dead, there is rubble, it is literally a deadzone.  No scary movie or horror story can compare to this type of devastation.  The black and white contrast seems to add even more depth to the pictures because of the consistent trend of nothingness.  It shows how massive the damage actually was.  What I found interesting is the trolley line with people riding bikes or walking on the same road.  Thinking of how they walked around after the bombs had dropped must be the strangest feeling because everything around them was simply gone.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 3:32 PM

This panoramic photograph shows the devastation of Hiroshima after the Atomic Bomb. Everything in sight is destroyed. Houses and poles that were lucky enough to still be standing are even lost causes.